16

The little stack overflow help menu says:

Use hash marks if you need several levels of headers:
# Header 1 #
## Header 2 ##
### Header 3 ###

The # character (pound-sign or hash-tag) is meant to be markdown language for headings. For example, the following mark-down code

# CANTALOUPE #

Is rendered as as the following in the output:

CANTALOUPE

However, sometimes the trailing #-signs get rendered in the output. Do space characters around # make a difference? What should I do to prevent # signs from displaying?

Examples:

Code:

# blah blah (`a` and `b`)# 

Output:

blah blah (a and b)#

Code:

###Begin Digression### 

Output:

Begin Digression###

  • 15
    Both examples have a trailing space. – user247702 Feb 4 at 17:20
  • 28
    FYI the # characters at the end are not required, # Header 1 works too. – user247702 Feb 4 at 17:22
  • 11
    I don't thing I've ever seen the trailing hashtag version of this. I've always just used the prefix in markdown services (SE, GitHub, markwon Android library, etc), and it works fine. – TheWanderer Feb 4 at 18:01
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    According to the CommonMark spec, spaces after the closing # should be ignored, though, but SE unfortunately doesn't implement the whole spec. – Erik A Feb 4 at 21:24
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    @ErikvonAsmuth We technically don't implement CommonMark at all. Ours is still a customized version of the original Markdown spec which didn't specify either way. CommonMark is still on its way, and should make this particular issue obsolete when we do deploy it. – animuson Feb 4 at 22:29
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    @ErikvonAsmuth But the spec says "The optional closing sequence of #s must be preceded by a space" (example 45). – Benjamin W. Feb 4 at 23:52
  • @TheWanderer A hashtag is an entity used on social media, consisting of a hash character (or pound, or octothorpe) followed by a text description that groups related resources. The character is not called "hashtag". When someone says "hashtag lol" it's because they're describing the hashtag that's referred to by the text #lol, not because they're literally reading it aloud (which would be "hash lol"). Cheers! – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 at 18:19
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit it's both merriam-webster.com/dictionary/hashtag – TheWanderer Feb 5 at 18:35
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    @TheWanderer Oh dear lord when did they add that definition?! :( :( Fine then, I suppose! – Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 5 at 18:43
  • Merriam-Webster describes common usage, not correct usage. When OED includes that meaning of "hashtag" I'll change my mind. Until then it's called a hash. – Cris Luengo Feb 5 at 18:53
  • Maybe I'm misreading but that definition concurs with the assessment that "hashtag" consists of the phrase and the symbol, not just the symbol. So *"trailing hashtag" is indeed incorrect usage. – Heretic Monkey Feb 8 at 19:42
19

SO's help page is weird on this topic. Both the original Daring Fireball's and GitHub's Markdown pages give priority to the form without the trailing #s. (See below.)

I'd highly recommend just omitting the closing #s to fix your problem.

The SO help page should be rewritten to emphasize the form without any closing #s. There's no advantage to using them. Honestly, I don't even know why they're supported in the original.

Daring Fireball

Daring Fireball header markdown demo

GitHub

GitHub header markdown demo

  • 10
    +1 for "SO's help page is weird." – Eb946207 Feb 5 at 0:27
  • 3
    Markdown is meant to be rather pretty without special Markdown rendering too, so I guess symmetric hashes are supported so you can nicely center them with hashes left and right. Looks nicer than just hashes on the left. Looking pretty is also the reason why === and --- are supported. – Rudy Velthuis Feb 5 at 18:45
2

sometimes the trailing #-signs get rendered in the output.

As noted by Stijn, in your examples, the trailing characters were a space, not a #-sign. So be sure to remove trailing spaces whenever you use the cosmetic markdown with #-signs.

Examples:

Code:

# blah blah (`a` and `b`)#

Output:

blah blah (a and b)

Code:

###Begin Digression###########################################

Output:

Begin Digression

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