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https://stackoverflow.com/questions/54385658/why-in-javascript-true-false (Deleted; screenshot for <10k users)

There are a few problems with it that I think would be solved by editing it - for example changing the title of it.

However - it's otherwise quite an interesting question. If it's a duplicate it should be closed as duplicate.

Is this an example of the 'unfriendly Stack Overflow culture' that this Stack Overflow blog post addresses?

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    Can we stop blaming "unfriendly culture" already? You write it has a few problems that would be solved by editing it, yet you didn't edit it. Isn't it better to improve a question instead of taking it to meta? – Modus Tollens Jan 27 at 7:26
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    Yep, it is! It pretty interesting – user9258013 Jan 27 at 8:19
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    Stack Overflow was definitely designed as a fairly strict system of peer review, which is great (IMNSHO, obviously) for already practicing professionals, but pretty much everything you would not want as a student or beginner. This is why I cringe so hard I practically turn myself inside out when people on Twitter mention that they have pointed their students at Stack Overflow. Jeff Atwood – rsjaffe Jan 27 at 15:36
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    Can you be specific about what makes you ask about unfriendliness? – Josh Caswell Jan 27 at 19:32
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    There is no such thing as an unfriendly Stack Overflow culture, it is just one of the many facades of outrage culture which is worldwide. Stack Overflow is simply an easy target, as it's rules and goals were designed for a user base that is less occupied with using personal feelings as a reason to demand change and can in fact set all that aside and just do the right thing without prejudice. – Gimby Jan 28 at 10:24
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Is this an example of the 'unfriendly Stack Overflow culture' that this Stack Overflow blog post addresses?

No, this is an example of a post with a few problems that has been curated through votes to indicate that the post is or is not currently useful, clear, and well researched.

Votes aren't to punish or reward an author; votes are for future readers to be able to judge the utility of the post and the likelihood that the post is worth spending their time reviewing when searching for an answer to their question. That post should not be upvoted until after the problems are fixed so that it is useful, clear, and shows good research effort. (Currently I would say it's clear, but neither useful or showing a good research effort.) This has nothing to do with being unwelcoming, and everything to do with assuring that Stack Overflow fulfills its goal of being a repository of high quality questions and answers about programming.

Fix the problems; don't blame the voters.

  • >That post should not be upvoted until after the problems are fixed so that it is useful, clear, and shows good research effort. Could you explain how this (2k upvotes) this or this question demostrate 'good research effort'? – dwjohnston Jan 28 at 0:46
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    @dwjohnston Examples of bad voting is not an excuse for continuing the practice. And the first example is a wiki entry, so probably not comparable. – rsjaffe Jan 28 at 1:39
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    @dwjohnston I can't. Which is why I would have downvoted these posts had I encountered them organically on the site (I try not to downvote stuff J see linked on meta: the meta effect kinda sucks). Your point is? – Patrice Jan 28 at 2:44
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    @dwjohnston I don't need to, because I didn't say "will not," I said "should not." I can't dictate how people will vote, I can only give the established guidelines about voting. And sure enough, in spite of the issues with the recent question which is now deleted, at least one person had upvoted it because when I looked it was at (-4,+1). People vote however they want. Though keep in mind, both those questions are from before 2010 when the site was new, and now they are top Google results: even if the original author didn't put forth much effort, they're now part of people's research efforts. – Davy M Jan 28 at 3:58

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