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Is there a nice and welcoming way to ask person posting the question to use correct terminology from the particular language they are asking about?

As an example I see most often: C# classes have "attributes" and "properties" which are two very different concepts. Many people use "attributes" as equivalent of "properties" which sometimes could be guessed from context but not always (sample - How to use child attributes in a inherited method).

Should one try to ask for using proper terms? If yes then what would be a good somewhat standard comment for it?

  • I think asking to RTFM with links above is unkind and deserves flagging as such.
  • trying to edit question may inadvertently change the meaning
  • voting "unclear" is non-productive as OP would not know why (as they presumably believe that is correct term) and often context is somewhat clear (especially for sample above - attributes are generally way outside of topics beginners asking about).
  • commenting "Please clarify if when you say 'Foo' you mean 'Bar'." may be an option also it may not be enough to hint OP on using wrong terminology.

Alternatively it may be exactly what we want - such post would be easy to find by people using wrong terms (also it hurts once who use correct terms).

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  • commenting "Please clarify if when you say 'Foo' you mean 'Bar'." may be an option also it may not be enough to hint OP on using wrong terminology.

This is probably the best option to be honest, as it not only gives the author a chance to clarify, but also leaves open the possibility that they may be right (whether or not they actually are). For many people, directly correcting their wrong terminology is inherently unwelcoming, because they

  1. expect readers to understand what they meant (and we do, if we're able to correct them in the first place)
  2. prefer to focus on the task at hand instead of quibbling over semantics
  3. perceive our attempts to correct them as us thinking they're not very competent or bright

How do I know this? Well I've been there. I've directly corrected others and been directly corrected. Sometimes you don't realize the impact of your words until someone else is delivering them to you in the same manner.

Yes, there are times when terminology/semantics is important or even critical to answering a question, such as your C# example. (Would you believe that attributes and properties mean different things in just about every programming language? I can't think of any right now where they mean the same thing but I can think of at least five where they don't.) In such cases, I don't think there's much better we can do than stating the difference explicitly in our answer to the question, especially when that difference literally answers the question.

But there are also times when that difference is tangential or editorial at best, and the question can be easily understood by doing a mental search-and-replace as we read. (If this sounds familiar to you, it's probably how you process broken English, like I do.) And, sure, that difference may become super important down the line, to potential questions the author might have in the future. In such cases, when editing is very unlikely to change the meaning of the question, it's probably OK to edit. Of those who have responded to my edits of this kind, more have appreciated my help than objected to me tampering with their stuff.

But when in doubt, I'd say requesting clarification in a comment in the manner described above is the way to go.

I agree completely with your thoughts on voting "unclear". Plus it gives the author an unnecessary hoop to jump through — which leaves an even poorer impression of our moderation if their question was clear to begin with.

Alternatively it may be exactly what we want - such post would be easy to find by people using wrong terms (also it hurts once who use correct terms).

Yeah, this is also something to consider. Our site search works best when search terms match actual content. If someone has a question about C# properties, but thinks they are called attributes and tries to search the site for "[c#] attributes", guess what sort of questions are going to turn up?

Unfortunately I don't have a good answer to this, or the idea of keeping incorrect terminology in questions (where the terminology matters in answering the question). I would say "don't use site search", but I've had only limited success with Google finding what it thinks I'm looking for rather than what my search terms are asking for. Often it either does return based on my exact terms even when I'm not using quotes, or it does that fuzzy matching when I'm not expecting it to, forcing me to use quotes (I'm sure we can all relate to saying "no, Google, I definitely meant attributes, not properties").

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This assumes that the OP knows that there is correct terminology out there for the thing they're describing. 99% of the time, they don't.

In this context, I would actually say that an answer correcting the use of terminology along with answering the question would be more appropriate than any of the actions you've illustrated above is the correct way to go. This way, should anyone know the incorrect terminology and stumble upon an answer here, they are enlightened by an answer which not only corrects the terminology, but succinctly answers the question.

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