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Prevent any answers until questions have had a bit of time to "age": to be reviewed, improved upon, or shown to be close-worthy. Stackoverflow is based upon developing a corpus of great questions and answers. Rapid-fire questions and answers are contrary to that goal, but the current structure incentivizes, to some extent, low-quality questions and answers, because of the quick rewards you can get.

Reasons:

  1. Reduces FGITW ("fastest gun in the west") advantage. It allows people to think about a question and provide a thoughtful answer as everyone will have an hour to think it over--the FGITW guy/gal will lose his/her time advantage. This allows slower guns to get their guns carefully aimed and loaded and so they can shoot at the same time as the FGITW folk
  2. Reduces chance of answering a duplicate (better chance it'll be closed as duplicate before an answer can appear).
  3. Increases the chance that a close-worthy question will not be answered before it is closed. This helps the roomba and reduces wasted effort on low-value questions.
  4. Disincentivizes help vampires. Reduces the chances someone will come here for a quick answer to something that could easily be found with a couple minutes of research.

Why for all questions rather than just for newbies:

  1. More welcoming. Doesn't discriminate against newbies.
  2. Not really a big deal for the questioner if you're really stuck on an issue. You've already spent a decent amount of time researching the subject.

Chances of adoption by SO:

  1. Nil. Will reduce traffic a bit (and thus revenue).

Response to concerns:

  1. "How will you get people to actually review content they have no chance to provide an answer to." Using the current interface, those who are mainly interested in providing answers can scroll down until they get to opened questions. Additionally, there are people who are interested in reviewing and helping improve. Those people can start from the top of the page. My impression is that there are plenty of people trying to patrol the site, and those will be the ones looking at the fresh questions. Those mainly trying to get in answers (and points) can just scroll down.
  2. How this is different from a mandatory review queue for new questions. There's no queue. I'm sick of queues, and those take you away from the main site and put you through a rigid workflow. This proposal just lets the site work as it currently does, so review happens "organically" (or not). This is certainly not a way of forcing review on new questions. My goal was to tweak the workflow rather than dramatically changing it. Yes, this isn't perfect, but it causes the least disruption to the current processes and should improve things.

marked as duplicate by rsjaffe, Stephen Rauch, Michael Gaskill, il_raffa, peterh says reinstate Monica Jan 25 at 15:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    There were enough proposals for "new posts mandatory review queues" and I don't see how this is different: please clarify that and address main concern of how you get people to actually review content they have no chance to provide an answer to. – Alexei Levenkov Jan 25 at 1:00
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    This simply moves the FGITW problem to question asked + 1 hour (or whatever you pick) and makes it worse. At T + 1 hour you'll just get lots of answers in the same second, how is that resultant duplication of effort a useful use of answerers time? – Robert Longson Jan 25 at 1:44
  • @RobertLongson I don't think this increases the pool of FGITW answers, but it allows slower guns to get their guns carefully aimed and loaded and so they can shoot at the same time as the FGITW folk. – rsjaffe Jan 25 at 1:51
  • @RobertLongson I've rephrased that point in the posting. I was incorrect to state that it reduces the number of FGITW answers--I'm just trying to remove the advantage FGITW folk have. – rsjaffe Jan 25 at 1:54
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    And why are even more answers on popular questions a good thing at all especially if they all say similar things? We should encourage people to spead out more not less. – Robert Longson Jan 25 at 1:55
  • @RobertLongson I don't see how this would increase the number of answers. I'm trying to level the playing field so that slowly-written answers can show up at the same time as rapid copy-paste crud. – rsjaffe Jan 25 at 1:57
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    People seeing that a question has already been answered with a reasonable answer move on and answer something else. You're proposing to impose a huge opportunity cost. – Robert Longson Jan 25 at 1:58
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    You want me to read a question to see if it is a duplicate or bad (close), and then come back to it later to answer it? No, thanks. If that's what you want to the the next step is to not show the questions at all for an hour so I only have to look at it once. – 1201ProgramAlarm Jan 25 at 2:08
  • @1201ProgramAlarm Read my question more carefully. That's not what I'm saying. Not everyone has the same preferences or attitude you do. This allows those who like to patrol SO and clean things up to look at the fresh questions. You would have the choice to scroll down to the 1-hour old questions. – rsjaffe Jan 25 at 2:35
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    And....not everyone has the same preferences or attitude you do. Judging by the voting, the common preference and attitude is decidedly not to implement this. You see the problem. – Clive Jan 25 at 7:52
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    This allows slower guns to get their guns carefully aimed and loaded and so they can shoot at the same time as the FGITW folk --> it's seems for me that you simply don't like other people to answer before you and you want this feature to be able to have a chance to answer first and earn more rep. As a side note, great answers come always later. – Temani Afif Jan 25 at 8:07
  • MSE duplicate. There's likely lots of dupes; this feature request comes up almost as often as people asking for reasons for downvotes. – fbueckert Jan 25 at 14:12
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As someone who both answers, and occasionally asks questions on Stack Overflow and other Stack Exchange sites, I am against this proposal.

As an answer-er, this would mean that many questions I could answer, would likely go unanswered: who knows what I am going to be doing an hour later? Likely not still on Stack Overflow.

As an ask-er, this would add at least 1-hour delay in solving my issue, which would be wasted time. Even worse, it is well known that new views on new questions drop exponentially at time passes, so the most likely outcome on some tags would be for the question to go unanswered. Which of course is bad for the people searching for answers too.

I understand that it would make the people that moderate the new question feed feel better, in that they prevented some "bad" questions getting answered, but still, in my view the peer-moderators should be content in knowing that if the question eventually gets deleted, all points earned from that post will be lost1.

1. Exceptions apply, see comment by Tiny Giant.

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    "Likely not still on Stack Overflow." - I wish this described me, I think I spend too much time here :) although I certainly wouldn't be looking at that question in particular an hour later – Nick A the Popcorn King Jan 25 at 9:59
  • Point being that you're both good folk and the best way to allow Stack Overflow to succeed is to not hinder good folk but to make their life easier so they can do more in that hour, not less. – Gimby Jan 25 at 11:06
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    "in my view the peer-moderators should be content in knowing that if the question eventually gets deleted, all points earned from that post will be lost" Reputation gained from posts that have a score of 3 or higher and have been on the site for more than 60 days is kept when such posts are deleted. – user4639281 Jan 25 at 15:57
  • @TinyGiant: That's true, thankfully, but if the question is truly bad, your answer is unlikely to get 3 upvotes, let alone survive on the site for 60 days... – user000001 Jan 25 at 15:59
  • Off-topic questions get upvoted all the time, and deletion usually takes a long time. – user4639281 Jan 25 at 16:06
5

Like most of the users I am against this and I will simply give somes examples to show how this proposal can be bad to SO than helpful.

Here is a good written question (Why everything word-wrap inside an absolute element nested inside a float or inline-block element) where I gave an answer after only 10min and the answer was thoughtful, clear and contain all what the OP need in order to understand his issue.

Was it a FGITW ("fastest gun in the west")? no it was not. I have probably a little more experience than the OP and I know what is going with his code. Why I have to wait 1h to give the answer? why the OP need to wait 1h to have his answer? This will simply be counter productive. If I have to wait 1h, I will probably give the answer in the comment section and move on which is bad.

I regularly answer and see such questions answered within few minutes and I can only see good things doing so.


If you want to fight bad questions it's easy: vote to close and downvote. Adding 1h of delay will change nothing because we always need 5 votes to close the question and in case there is no roomba later we have to cast 3 deletes votes. Bad questions (even answered) will not survive too long and I don't see how the 1h delay will make their death sooner.


You said:

It allows people to think about a question and provide a thoughtful answer as everyone will have an hour to think it over--the FGITW guy/gal will lose his/her time advantage. This allows slower guns to get their guns carefully aimed and loaded and so they can shoot at the same time as the FGITW folk

Well, you can take even 1 day to think and write a good answer. The FGITW (like you call them) doesn't have any advantage. Why you want to stop them? let them answer and you take all the time you want to give your thoughtful answer. A question is never closed and can be answered at any time (even if it contains an accepted answer). Voting will decide about the quality of an answer, not the time.

Here is a question I have answered 6 years after being asked Selecting and manipulating CSS pseudo-elements such as ::before and ::after using jQuery and the votes made my answer better than old ones. By time, it may become more upvoted.

Another question (How to vertically align text inside a flexbox?) where THE best answer come after one year and the votes is making it better than the accepted answer provided after only 10min.

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