25

Consider the following scenario:

A well written question with an MCVE is posted that asks why a piece of code isn't working. Someone posts a comment with a link to the documentation that shows the answer is that the version of the software/language needs to be upgraded.

What is the appropriate course of action?

  • Vote to close? If so, what close reason?
  • Post the comment as an answer?
  • Something else?

Specifically, the scenario is something like:

I'm trying to do the following:

a = foo.bar(x)

But I'm getting the error:

Error: module `foo` has no attribute `bar`

The comments:

user123: As shown in the docs, foo.bar is only available in version 2.1 and above.

OP: You're right. I see that CloudCorp DataTool only supports 2.0. I think I can figure out another way to do what I need using the tools available in 2.0.

  • 2
    I have seen many answers suggesting to downgrade, but that's an other question ;) – Vega Jan 19 at 19:13
  • @Vega perhaps I should have been broader and asked "where the answer is use a different version" – pault Jan 22 at 18:47
43

Technically, the answer to the question is

You are unable to use bar because it is not available in your version <link to documentation>

Because "no you can't do that" is a perfectly valid answer.

But a good "no" answer explains why it doesn't work and provides a work around or solution. In this case the solution you can provide is some combination of:

You need to upgrade to v2.1 to use bar

and

You need to use library foobar to replicate this functionality in v2.0

and

You can use this code to accomplish the same task

function magicbar(x) {
    return x * somemagic;
    } 

The reason multiple solutions are important (assuming they exist) is because it may help someone. The OP might not be able to upgrade, but someone else in the future might have the same problem and upgrading is an option. But the workaround or library might be good for the OP. Essentially you don't want reduce the scope of your solution/workaround to only accommodate the OP's restrictions if there is a better option since you may help a future reader with the same problem

  • It's not that dangerous. Just a little "magicbar" you know... – Antoine Pelletier Jan 21 at 17:34
14

If you can explain why the only solution is to upgrade to a newer version it might make a good answer, but it should be remembered that updating versions is not always possible. If the upgraded versions changes or breaks some existing functionality the tradeoff of updating other code or living with the broken functionality may not be worth it.

In the end that is something that the user asking the question needs to decide once they have the knowledge that they need to upgrade to get what they want done.

One other key thing to remember is that upgrading versions may require different or additional licenses to be purchased due to changes between versions (especially if they are really out of date), so that is something else to consider.

12

In short, as long as it is accurate, it is a good answer.

I've been doing more Apple/iOS/Xcode development lately, and I am very grateful for both "upgrade" and "workaround-solution" answers.

I do think we should scrutinize answers that casually assert you must upgrade. There are parts of the industry where that happens, and I've objected to them both as a customer and when I happened to work for a company that did this.

Making a rough distinction between commercial software vs. developer environments, I do think that "you must upgrade to version x to solve your problem" would be correct less often on Stack Overflow vs. Server Fault.

(On face, developers have more ways to workaround problems than commercial/IT software, at least in my experience.)

I also think workarounds have more value to developers, because they are often better able to assess the risk (or ask further questions) than the average administrator or power user.

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