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I propose to send all edits of answers through the edit review queue. (Original authors are free to edit without review in whatever way they see fit and approve changes single-handedly as they do now).

Why it is good for the site:

  • changes to answers can significantly modify meaning of them and it is especially problematic for highly voted questions. Reviewers likely will stop that.
  • editing of answers should generally be scoped to spelling/writing style that can be reviewed by anyone and does not require any special knowledge.
  • it makes easier to maintain consistent bar of edits of answers that way as many higher reputation users made small number (if any) edits that go through review queue and hence don't have rules burned into they brains (i.e. may add links to other information sources or alternative answers).

Potential downsides:

  • potentially larger number of edits in the queue (also I don't think that there are so many edits of answers by 2K users)
  • making essentially impossible to update outdated upvoted/accepted answers (but will align more with "votes decide usefulness")

I understand that this will likely make changes more limited than currently suggested by editing help (which allows adding links to extra info and code changes), but overall I think consensus on meta is that such changes to answers is almost always "against author intent". I'll make updating help into separate FR if there is interest expressed in comments.

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    What is wrong with the current model, where all edit history is visible and edits cause posts to be bumped up the page? Where it matters, the community catches changes that are out of order all the time, without putting additional review burden in our community for reviewing what for the majority are applicable and fine edits. We do not need to place a huge speed bump in the path of those edits. – Martijn Pieters Jan 5 at 14:46
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    Do you have any concrete evidence that there actually is a problem with inappropriate edits going unnoticed and unchallenged for large amounts of time, in sufficient quantity to justify reviewing every single 3rd-party edit? – Martijn Pieters Jan 5 at 14:49
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I think there's more than a few problems here

changes to answers can significantly modify meaning of them and it is especially problematic for highly voted questions. Reviewers likely will stop that.

You're giving reviewers WAY too much credit. My experience has been that reviewers (especially the inexperienced) tend to be heavy on the approval side. I've seen some truly terrible edits approved (as in I had to mod flag them and the reviewers probably got a review ban) by people who were asleep at the wheel.

editing of answers should generally be scoped to spelling/writing style that can be reviewed by anyone and does not require any special knowledge.

Er, no. Sometimes people need a shove with an edit. Today I edited in a quote to complement a valid link on another SE site. The edit brings the answer in-line with network-wide standards. Edits shouldn't change the meaning while improving clarity. Good luck trying to lock it down beyond that

it makes easier to maintain consistent bar of edits of answers that way as many higher reputation users made small number (if any) edits that go through review queue and hence don't have rules burned into they brains (i.e. may add links to other information sources or alternative answers).

I think you're saying this raises the cost of edits. That's true, but you're assuming that higher reputation users are out there making wholesale bad edits anyways. This might be an argument for raising the reputation to make edits but it's a terrible argument for removing it altogether. We want higher reputation users to help curate the site. That means making lots of changes to help answers fit. Sit in the New Answers To Old Questions tool (10k) sometime and just watch the answers pour in and try to resist not fixing some of them. Raising the cost of fixing those alone is not worth it, let alone the thousands of other answers a day SO gets.

  • Regarding the first bit, are there any stats on a global approval rate? Last I checked mine, it was ~55-60% rejection. – jhpratt Jan 5 at 4:29
  • @jhpratt my rate was 18%, although I have a much smaller sample size of 22 vs your 175. – TheWanderer Jan 6 at 3:39

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