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I'm quite new to the Stack Exchange environment, but I would like to grow to be a helpful and positive contributor.

This solution is one I'd like implemented on higher dimensions, as the original question asked.

Is it wrong or bad form to start a new question based on a requested expansion of this solution? What is the best way to proceed in such situations, where a solution doesn't completely answer the asked question, but gives only a partial solution? Particularly when the expanded solution is the desired result.

  • Note that stackoverflow is not a code writing service. So don't ask "please give me code for this variant of the same question", but rather ask about conceptual things. Ib that particular case, I don't see a conceptual difference. – Anony-Mousse Jan 1 at 10:04
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Is it wrong or bad form to start a new question based on a requested expansion of this solution?

Sure you can do that, and that's not inherently wrong.
Be sure to be explicit how the existing answer(s) don't cover your particular problem. Also be sure to copy all the relevant code into your question to make it self contained in 1st place.

What is the best way to proceed in such situations, where a solution doesn't completely answer the asked question, but gives only a partial solution? Particularly when the expanded solution is the desired result.

As mentioned above, make it crystal clear how the provided solutions/answers don't meet your particular problem.

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This is tangential to the discussion, but I wanted to explain when and why follow up questions are appropriate to open.

A lot of times users ask a question, receive answers, accept one, and then later realise they had oversimplified their problem to the extent that none of the posted solutions would adequately generalise to their actual data/problem. This often ends up with the OP trying to get users to iteratively debug their code/problems. When this happens to me, and if the follow-up questions are not trivial, I advice the OP to open a follow up question referencing their existing one with their revised problem statement, their current code, and an explanation of why their current code does not work.

Follow up questions are fine. Although, I would advise you to make the follow up non-trivial enough so as to not encourage close votes or downvotes.

  • *advice --> advise Why am I seeing this mistake everywhere? – jpmc26 Jan 1 at 3:44
  • @jpmc26 I've seen people do worse. – cs95 Jan 1 at 4:14

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