-18

Flexbox equal height white space issue. Any workarounds without using grid? Need pure CSS solution

I have tried all the possible ways and mentioned in my question clearly saying that I need to support IE browser and looking for an alternative solution.

This question should not have been marked as a duplicate. Need community judgment.

  • 10
    As the user who Mjolnired the question I still consider this a duplicate. The OP, it seems, just doesn't like the answers there for various reasons (which, I opine, are covered by the dupe). Even if there were a hack/woraround I'd suggest that answer should be on the Canonical and not this new question. – Paulie_D Dec 19 '18 at 13:17
  • 1
    Why/How should I like that answer, which doesn't me helps me at all? My requirement is different. Here in SO, there are plenty of such questions which are not duplicated by any of the moderators. – Mr.7 Dec 19 '18 at 13:23
  • Why not put a bounty on the duplicate target? – BSMP Dec 19 '18 at 13:37
  • 1
    It does really look like a duplicate. If somebody comes up with a pure css solution working for old browsers, he'd better answer the old question. – Denys Séguret Dec 19 '18 at 13:37
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    Just because you seems to have not read the first paragraph of the accepted answer maybe ? I shorten it for you "You can not achieve what you want without grid out of ugly hacks". So: go read it again and ask for clarification on what you don't understand instead of advocating your original question is not a dupe. – Tensibai Dec 19 '18 at 13:38
  • 3
    @Mr.7 have you considered the possibility that what you want to achieve is simply not possible? You only option is to loosen your requirements and use one of the suggested methods from the duplicate. – user247702 Dec 19 '18 at 13:46
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    Instead of claiming it's not a duplicate I advice to use the duplicate as a starting point to find the solution ... read the comments, follow all the links, check the related questions, etc etc – Temani Afif Dec 19 '18 at 14:03
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    @Paulie_D I don't think I agree. A different requirement (such as supporting an old browser) is totally a valid reason for having two different questions. It's very much encouraged, actually, to base a question upon an existing one if someone finds it unsatisfactory. There's no problem with having answers on multiple questions, if the answers differ, and I am pretty sure such a question would vary wildly in the case of supporting IE 10. They are also totally not required to give a justification for not wanting to use javascript. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Dec 19 '18 at 14:15
  • @FélixGagnon-Grenier but the target question already covered all the differente cases, even the question it self contains some ways to do ... and let's don't forget the related links within the question and the external sources. (I will add more duplicates) – Temani Afif Dec 19 '18 at 14:17
  • @TemaniAfif If the questions are not proposing a solution that is both IE 10, and javascript less, then the question warrants staying opened. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Dec 19 '18 at 14:18
  • @FélixGagnon-Grenier and such solution doesn't exist .. that's what we are trying to tell – Temani Afif Dec 19 '18 at 14:18
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    @TemaniAfif Then the question should stay open! If the duplicate target questions are not proposing a solution that is both IE 10, and javascript less, then the question warrants staying opened. You, me, and everyone here, are in no position to force OP to accept an answer that does not meet their criterions, no matter how you like those criterions or not. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Dec 19 '18 at 14:19
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    I can't help but feel additional constraints keep getting added to keep trying to invalidate the duplicate. Your original question said nothing about supporting IE10, and was correctly closed as a dupe. Then that constraint was added, and when that did not achieve the desired outcome, due to there being multiple methods to achieve it in the answer, you added that it should be pure CSS, and then javascript can't be used. If you keep moving the goalposts, it doesn't really feel like you're asking in good faith. – fbueckert Dec 19 '18 at 14:30
20

It's really the same question. Nobody came up with an answer that was pure CSS and applicable to old browsers.

Sometimes it might be acceptable to try ask again, after a long time, in case there were some technology changes, but you do ask for a solution working on old browsers. And as the comments make it clear there's still no such solution...

There's no reason to keep your question around even if you initially had a doubt.

14

Here is a quote from the duplicate:

In fact, until a CSS technology arrives with the ability to automatically close the gaps, CSS in general has no solution. Something like this would probably require reflowing the document, so I'm not sure how useful or efficient it would be.

You'll need a script.

The duplicate question shows many ways to achieve this and most of them are hack and workarounds and there is still no generic way to do this with pure CSS. Considering the fact that you want to target old browsers and you cannot use JS, you simply make this more complicated.

So the answer is somehow : "you cannot do this with your requirements and the best you could do is already described within the duplicate".

If you are not convinced about this you can activate a bounty on the duplicate target saying that you want a solution with pure CSS that works on old browser without JS. I would personnaly follow the bounty as myself I am intrested to know if such way exist (even if I am convinced that there is actually no way).


I have added more duplicate btw

-11

Stack Overflow aims to be a repository of knowledge. If a question has not been asked, features differences from a duplicate targe and / or has different requirements than another question, it is a valid question to be asked on Stack Overflow. We don't lack disk space.

In this case, the two requirements

  • Work on IE 10
  • Javascript less

Make the existing answers on the duplicate target not usable. We have no right to either force OP to accept something or dismiss their requirements. They have no justification to give, and as long as their question have not been asked before with its requirements, it deserves staying open.

  • With the exception that what op wants is not possible (which is explained in the duplicate) and can only be achieved by a work-around (which is also given in the duplicate). So how would a answer to the new question be different from the one in the duplicate? – BDL Dec 19 '18 at 14:31
  • Technologies change. New people find new ways. Things rarely stay impossible for a long time. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Dec 19 '18 at 14:33
  • So you're suggesting that we allow duplicate questions when the answer is "you can't do that", in case someone later figures out a method that does work? – user247702 Dec 19 '18 at 14:35
  • I am suggesting that merely because a question is impossible, does not mean we should force answers down askers throats. You are suggesting that, if a question is impossible, we should dupe it to the next best thing? There's no inherent problem with a question staying open, btw. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Dec 19 '18 at 14:36
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    Let's assume for a moment we keep the question open. How would a answer look like? I mean except for "This is not possible". Also note, that op asks about a technology that is not actively developed anymore (and also wasn't when the duplicate was asked), so it is very unlikely that a new solution comes up in future. – BDL Dec 19 '18 at 14:38
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    But it's not just "the next best thing". The question being discussed is "I want to do X with requirements Y and Z" and the duplicate target is "I want to do X with requirement Y". As far as we know, the answer to the duplicate target is an exhaustive list of methods, so even when there is no method listed that satisfies requirement Z, it still is a duplicate. – user247702 Dec 19 '18 at 14:43

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