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I posted this Validate number with Decimal Separator and optional Thousands separator with regex question yesterday. Before posting it I tried a bunch of different combinations, and read many posts.

I am not happy to admit, I am not that great with regex, and I don't know anyone that is better than me (I mean in real life). So in the end I posted the question.

Yet I got several downvotes and mark it as duplicate of several questions, none of which have the expression I need and a comment that says: enter image description here

Ok so in theory if I keep at it, eventually, I should be able to come with a expression that works (I hope I should at least), and the comment from the closing person basically says I should. I updated my question referencing every question linked as duplicate for mine and gave examples for which the different expressions didn't work.

The closer seems to suggest I should combine them all and make it work. Which btw Is what I was trying to do before posting my question.

So it is wrong from me to ask in this site this kind of question? I thought I covered everything, I stated my issue correctly, I demonstrated I did research, I know that eventually, giving an endless period of time, I should be able to solve it by myself, but I have no way of knowing how long will it take me. But from the comment it seems, if I am theoretically capable of solving the issue, I shouldn't post here.

I know regex is a special case, there are so many, and so many people has posted questions about them. But I went through many, many of those posts, and couldn't find a expression that works correctly for what I feel is a rather extremely common problem, that is why I posted my question.

I would really appreciate your guidance on this. So far I updated my question with comments about the duplicates, and voted to reopen, but I don't know if I should have and if it will actually get reopen.

Update

Also, this may seem like a poor excuse, but in general I have great difficulty reading regex because a problem I have with my eyes. So making and spotting small changes on them is hard for me. So I am sorry if the regex I requested is really simple. Maybe someone can suggest me better tools to work with them? For example adding colors actually doesn't help, it makes them harder to read.

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    https://regex101.com/, https://regexr.com/ and literally dozens of other identical sites exist for a reason. Coming here for a copy paste solution you will not understand is not useful to you or anyone else and should not be expected from this site. If that is what you want, reddit and other forums exists for that kind of expectation. – user10677470 Dec 18 '18 at 15:11
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    @Dzyann The fundamental issue here is that this is a very basic question, that has been solved, and the solutions published, discussed, dissected, and rediscussed thousands of times over endless easily-accessible resources on the Web. You get the downvotes because you shouldn't need to ask about this on SO at all, a simple Google search should get you everything you need, and more. In general, if you can imagine "many other programmers must have had this same problem before me", that suggests there is a pre-existing solution easily found via searching, and you needn't ask on SO. – Dan Bron Dec 18 '18 at 15:31
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    I am sympathetic to that situation. We have all been in it. My suspicion is that you couldn't find what you needed because you had honed in on a solution before you started searching, and then searched for keywords related to that solution. To improve your results, next time, back up, formulate a clear and short description of the overall problem, and then search for that ("validating numbers in Java", or whatever). You may need to search recursively as you come across new terms or concepts in your first search, and dig into those. – Dan Bron Dec 18 '18 at 15:41
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    @Dzyann Yeah, what I’m trying to point out that focusing on regex is the problem. The problem you have isn’t “what’s a regex for validating numbers”, it’s “validating numbers in java”. Regex is your proposed solution, you need to back up a step until you can articulate the actual holistic problem, and start your search there. See what I mean? If I’m hungry, and I decide I want a peanut butter and honey sandwich, & I want the honey to be organic clover honey harvested by West Ecuadorian bumblegrumblers strictly on Tuesdays ... it’s going to be hard. The problem is I’m hungry. Start there – Dan Bron Dec 18 '18 at 15:53
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    BTW, SO loves it, loves it, when you give the full background and motivation for why you want a specific thing, why your full constraints are. We wish all Qs would include that background. I promise you if you include that information in your future Qs, they’ll get a much better reception. (Aside: in order to actually include this information, which SO will reward you for, you necessarily must have done the all the thinking & problem framing I describe above, which will also have the side effect of sharpening the searches you did before SO, so sometimes you don’t have to ask at all!) – Dan Bron Dec 18 '18 at 16:15
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    Here is the most famous example of this constantly recurring “substitute solution for problem” pattern on SO: stackoverflow.com/q/1732348/2562182. The answer is so popular because the mistake for OPs is so very very common. – Dan Bron Dec 18 '18 at 16:39
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    I think downvoting because you think I shouldn't use regex, when you can't posibly know everything that there is to my situation is slightly biased - This is literally why the downvote button exists. Regex is likely the wrong solution to this problem, so, yes, people should downvote if they believe the question is not useful. It's more an overcomplication of the problem space. Subscribe to the KISS principle. – fbueckert Dec 18 '18 at 16:47
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    @Dzyann “The correct regex” can’t exist because you specifically say you need to handle regionalization. Regexes by their very definition are context-free, and so at very least there would need to be pre-processing of the input, post-processing of the output, or programmatic & contextual construction of the regex at runtime. But all that is immaterial. This is a divergence from what we were discussing. I was not discussing “what’s best for the world”, I was trying to help you solve problems better & as a side effect use SO more effectively. Plus the dupe says your Q didn’t help the world. – Dan Bron Dec 18 '18 at 16:48
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    And yet, your question is still downvoted. We're trying to build a lasting knowledgebase of information. How useful is a question that crams the wrong attempted solution in the grand scheme of things? Regex can be a solution, but here, I think, it's not the solution you should be using. It's much more useful for future readers to read, "Don't use regex for this problem. Use this much more simple method that does not have the problems regex does." – fbueckert Dec 18 '18 at 16:58
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    as you have been told over and over the the correct solution is to just try and parse the number with javascript function, that is the idiotmatic way to do number validation in JavaScript. This is a solved problem the fact that you insist on wanting to do it in regex is irrelevant, the root question is validate numbers in javascript, that is the question that is useful to everyone else, you insistence that regex is the question that is useful to everyone else is false. – user10677470 Dec 18 '18 at 17:55
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    removing the JavaScript tag does not make it the correct answer to the root cause question. Regardless of language the correct answer is use whatever native function your language has for parsing numbers. – user10677470 Dec 18 '18 at 18:14
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    that is exactly why it is an X/Y Problem as you have been told over and over as well. You are asking a question about a solution (which is not the solution), instead of the problem. – user10677470 Dec 18 '18 at 18:39
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    A question is only a duplicate if all possible answers to the current question are also possible answers to the target question, and vice versa. A question cannot be a duplicate of multiple questions combined, as googlers who aren't signed in will be automatically redirected to only one of those questions, and they won't get their answer. It could be too broad though if it is actually trying to solve multiple unrelated problems at the same time, instead of one problem (or multiple directly linked/dependent problems), or unclear if it is not well-defined (ambiguous or open to interpretation) – user4639281 Dec 18 '18 at 19:19
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    If you asked the actual question How to parse/convert Strings to Numbers regardless of the locale format of the String?, you would not get this regex as the answer. Like I said, you have been told that this is the actual problem, but you insist that your solution is the problem, and it isn't. It is How to parse/convert Strings to Numbers regardless of the locale format of the String, if that question got a regex as an answer, that "answer" would be down voted into oblivion because it would be incorrect, especially for beginners finding it in the future. – user10677470 Dec 18 '18 at 19:47
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I think you got the short end of the stick on this one.

The big thing here is that a lot of these votes aren't telling you that your question is bad or somehow otherwise poor quality. These votes appear to indicate that they don't like what you're asking about, or they don't like your solution.

Now it's fine for people to not like your question or your approach, but I would also expect to see some answers on your question in reference to what a more preferable approach would be as opposed to raking you over the coals (in comments no less) behind why your approach is wrong.

No one comes to Stack Overflow to hear why they are doing it wrong, and instead of being given an opportunity to hear a different answer, you were just...treated poorly for that.

Sorry about that.

It's fine to ask this kind of question here, but you do have to be prepared to accept a different kind of answer to the one you were looking for. There are a few different ways to solve problems like this, and it's important to keep that in mind when going through this exercise.

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    "The big thing here is that a lot of these votes aren't telling you that your question is bad or somehow otherwise poor quality." But they are. They're saying that the question was poorly asked, and is not useful as a result, and also that it's extremely poorly researched. No one is saying they just don't like it. – Servy Dec 18 '18 at 22:42
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    @Servy: You're going to have to explain this one to me. I see a question which has the kind of data the OP is trying to compare against, what they've tried, where they've failed, and what prior research they've attempted. By the book, this question is fine. What's not fine is that it's using Regex as a way to solve this problem - and while I probably wouldn't either, that's not really a reason to downvote the question. What are you seeing? I genuinely want to know since I don't want to be missing something important here. – Makoto Dec 18 '18 at 22:50
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    Given that there's already like 75 comments on this meta question already explaining the problems with this question, I don't really see a need to repeat any of what's been said any more than it's already been said. – Servy Dec 18 '18 at 22:54
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    Funnily enough I based most of my belief that this was a question that wasn't liked on the comment exchange. A snippet of the exchange exists in the question itself as a picture but remains unlinked/hidden for when the comments are deleted. I cannot see anything there other than "XY problem"-this and "don't use Regex"-that in the comments, which would beg for an answer which doesn't use any of that. The fact that there's a 40+ comment chain arguing over the question as it's stated tells me that the commentators really don't want to answer it. – Makoto Dec 18 '18 at 22:56
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    Yes, commentors pointing out problems with the question is indeed them indicating that they don't want to answer it. We don't want to answer questions that aren't useful. That's...kinda the premise of the site. – Servy Dec 18 '18 at 22:58
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    ...and it's fine to not want to answer the question. But that doesn't make the question objectively bad. I saw nothing in the question to make me believe that it deserved any kind of negative voting. – Makoto Dec 18 '18 at 22:59
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    So let me get this straight. You don't want to answer a question which asks how to validate that a number comes in in the correct decimal and comma-delimited format, and you also don't think that such a question is not useful? – Makoto Dec 18 '18 at 22:59
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    And yet you said yourself that you don't think it's a useful question, because you don't think it's a good idea to be trying to use a regex to parse a number. Given that questions that a reader thinks aren't useful should be downvoted, you think the question should be downvoted. – Servy Dec 18 '18 at 23:00
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    @Servy: Where'd I say that specifically? I merely stated that I wouldn't respond with a regex solution. That doesn't mean that the question isn't useful. – Makoto Dec 18 '18 at 23:01
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    @Servy: That tells me that the dupe was insufficient or inappropriate. The only one I can see in the post history would be this one but that's not a complete answer either, since it only indicates how to check if a single number is numeric, not formatted in a specific way. Maybe trincot could elaborate on what they closed it as and we could go from there. – Makoto Dec 18 '18 at 23:06
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    @Servy: The whole point of closing as a dupe is to be sure that the OP gets an answer. If they don't feel like they got an answer from the dupe, they are empowered to edit their question and illustrate why it's not an answer. I'm not sure why you're getting worked up over the fact that someone is using the system as prescribed. – Makoto Dec 18 '18 at 23:07
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    @Makoto And if you continue to campaign that questions like, "how do I parse a numeric string in javascript" are well research high quality questions that shouldn't be downvoted, closed as a duplicate, nor should anyone ever comment on them to indicate that they're in any way problematic, then you're going to drive away all of the quality minded users and you no longer get useful answers to questions. Being "welcoming" doesn't mean, "Removing all semblance of quality standards and claiming all questions are good questions, and anyone providing any negative feedback is a bad person." – Servy Dec 18 '18 at 23:22
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    @Makoto People pointed out problems with the quality of the question, and you responded by saying that that's what's making SO unwelcoming, and that people downvoting or closing a question is "not treating the author very good". When you define downvoting a question that you think isn't useful as not treating the author well, that's you saying you're advocating for a reduction in quality. – Servy Dec 18 '18 at 23:30
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    @Dzyann Well Makoto was saying that all your question was asking is how to parse a numeric string in javascript, I was responding to that. I have indicated in several comments that I don't feel that's what your question is asking. One of the main problems with your question is that it doesn't actually do a good job of explaining the actual problem, hence why everyone is telling you that your question is an XY question. Explaining the actual problem you're trying to solve would help address that. – Servy Dec 18 '18 at 23:32
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    I gotta agree with @Servy here, Makoto. This has all the markings of an XY problem, and defending it as good is...kind of astonishing, I feel. It's a very contrived problem, with no real backing as to why it has to be a regex, other than the continued insistence that it must be. That doesn't sound like a quality question to me in any sense; it sounds like a super specific, localized issue that nobody else will encounter, because its jumps straight to a supposed solution, instead of explaining the problem. How is this question going to be useful to readers in the future? – fbueckert Dec 19 '18 at 0:28
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Your question was really not a bad question. There are 6 upvotes and 10 downvotes, meaning that at least some users thought it was a good question. The downvotes may have come from things other than quality.

As for reopening, you did the best thing to do in that situation: editing and voting to reopen. If you don't think your post is a duplicate, always edit to explain why and vote to reopen if you have 250+ reputation. It will get reopened if enough users agree that it's not a duplicate.

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    six upvotes is generally (not always) an indication that is a very good question. In this case, though, I'm thinking much of those votes were from the Meta effect. – TylerH Dec 19 '18 at 14:17

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