I have encountered several questions in that were formed as if the asker doesn't even know what should he do with the code he posts in the question, one of them even had a code copy pasted from flash.utils.Sound online docs. I don't understand whether to just close them outright would be the best action. The main problem is that those that ask these questions are using new accounts, so I can't immediately say if trolling, stupid, or educationally degraded, or maybe even unable to ask properly because English for them is foreign, and I have to abide by Stack Overflow/Stack Exchange's new code of conduct that says "be nice to newcomers". But if asked this face to face, I'd either laugh at them if they are not first-grade students or tell them to RTFM if they are. Here in Stack Overflow, I'm just leaving them a comment saying something IMO Useful for a generic them, or a downvote if I can't form any kind of reply, but I feel it's not the best possible reaction to such questions. So, how do you think, how should a Stack Overflow member with enough experience to detect cargo cult coding attempts in their proficiency area react to a question that looks like an attempt to use some code found elsewhere blindly?

PS: No sarcasm intended.

marked as duplicate by gnat, HaveNoDisplayName, il_raffa, Blackwood, Michael Gaskill Dec 5 at 13:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    Maybe a friendly warning? "Make sure that you understand what your code is doing here. Otherwise, you'll keep running into trouble." – S.L. Barth Dec 5 at 12:21
  • 1
    @gnat Probably this meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/257868/… would be a better dupe base. Thanks for linking anyway. – Vesper Dec 5 at 12:28
  • IMO neither of these is a duplicate. We need a friendly way of telling people to understand what their code does. Or at least a friendly version of "RTFM". Hopefully this question will inspire one. – S.L. Barth Dec 5 at 12:31
  • agree, that other link also fits. I picked my dupe primarily because of this answer over there – gnat Dec 5 at 12:35
  • As RTFM is the abbreviation of "read the friendly manual", that's got it covered. – usr2564301 Dec 5 at 13:35
  • 1
    "But if asked this face to face, I'd either laugh at them if they are not first-grade students or tell them to RTFM if they are" -- I, for one, hope that you don't find yourself mentoring beginners face-to-face with any frequency. Suggesting to someone that they need to take a step back and brush up on the foundational concepts isn't necessarily unwelcoming - it just has to be done in good faith, without judgement or condescension. – Sam Hanley Dec 5 at 14:33
  • 1
    I think you just articulated for me why, I've noticed, I rarely ever answer AS3 questions despite having the knowledge to. Something just never feels right about most of the questions being asked. – BoltClock Dec 5 at 15:32
  • I think you are referring to "cargo cult" coding. This term derives from new religious movements of the South Pacific in the years following WW2 that centered around worshiping the US military. – Robert Columbia Dec 5 at 18:52
  • 1
    @RobertColumbia Yep exactly. They replicate stuff mindlessly, as do those programmers that don't know what that code does and how. – Vesper Dec 6 at 4:02
  • Ah yes, "the learning process". We all want to believe it is as easy as just putting people inside really tight school benches and telling them knowledge/common sense which they'll then absorb and apply, but the bitter reality is that they need to feel pain before those words start to matter ;) If you want people to learn, let them slam. Its what they want, they set themselves up for it whether they realise it or not. I've done so too, I'm only partially deformed after the fact. – Gimby Dec 6 at 10:14
  • 1
    Honestly Vesper, I just stopped bothering. I see you a lot around the AS3 tag, and I commend you for the help you provide. But the amount of garbage questions on the actionscript tag is staggering, nowadays every third question is about some moron decompiling a flash game and wondering what loc means. I think a good 50% of my comments/answers on AS3 questions are just links to documentation, because they don't read it. Downvote and move on. – user2655904 Dec 6 at 15:12
up vote 23 down vote accepted

Ask yourself:

Does this question show any research effort; is it clear or useful?

If no, downvote.

Ask yourself:

Does this question fall under any of the categories of the close reasons?

If so, vote to close.

It is your prerogative to leave a comment, however, that sometimes aggravates the user further and allows them to actually vent on you as opposed to the actions above which don't make you a direct punch bag.

The main problem is that those that ask these questions are using new accounts, so I can't immediately say if trolling, stupid or educationally degraded, or maybe even unable to ask properly because English for them is foreign, and I have to abide by SO/SE's new code of conduct that says "be nice to newcomers".

It shouldn't matter if the user is new or seasoned, the rules still apply. The "welcoming" hasn't (yet) stated that flagging, VTCing, or down-voting is "unwelcoming", so knock yourself out.

  • "Does this question fall under any of the categories of the close reasons?" I would ask that question backwards, since we have custom close reasons. – Braiam Dec 5 at 18:51
  • For me, down-voting without explaining the downvote IS "unwelcoming". – Malky.Kid Dec 7 at 17:17
  • 1
    @Malky.Kid the vast majority of this community would disagree with you (as would I) and as it stands currently, so would the site's policies. – Script47 Dec 7 at 17:20

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .