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In the recent past, I have asked a few questions relating to language/standard library design -

  1. Why is C++'s void type only half-heartedly a unit type?

  2. Why does Rust have a "Never" primitive type?

  3. Why does the C++ standard not provide printing for common containers?

The first two questions have been upvoted (+10 and +4 at the moment), whereas the last one has been "put on hold as primarily opinion-based".

From my perspective as the asker, they're all very similar questions -- I would like to know the official reasoning, if there exists some, behind existing design decisions. Some good history-based (i.e. not based on the opinions of merely the answerer) answers to such a question might look like -

  1. I was on the committee when X was being decided and the committee decided to not do X because of Y and Z.

  2. I am not on the committee but if you look at this link, it says that proposal X was rejected because of Y and Z, which applies to your question as well.

  3. This point X has come up in informal discussions on the committee's mailing list/GitHub issue tracker (see link). However, because of Y and Z (see follow-ups in that link), there was never any enthusiasm to put X into the standard.

So I'm not sure why the third question was put on hold as primarily opinion-based, whereas the first and second were upvoted. How do I rephrase such questions better? Or should I avoid asking these kind of questions on Stack Overflow altogether?

marked as duplicate by Raedwald, Stephen Leppik, Stephen Rauch, Arun Vinoth, Blackwood Nov 30 '18 at 20:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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From my POV, the three questions aren't similar.

The first one asks why void was defined as it is, the second one asks why there was a decision to have "Never". In both cases the questions ask why something was done in a specific way. In all such cases, there is at least one person who wrote the proposal and can tell you why they defined it that way. In other words, adding or defining something is always a deliberate decision.

The third question asks why something is not present in the language. Not adding something is not always a deliberate decision. Maybe noone thought about it? It might not have been discussed at all. In this case all answers will be speculations that can't be backed by any evidence. (There can be cases where not adding something was decided by a committee, but I don't think that this is the case here).

From Erik von Asmuth answer:

If you want official answers from someone involved in the design of a specific language, SO is not the right place. We expect questions a random expert in that language can answer.

  • Thanks, I think I understand the difference now. "this case all answers will be speculations that can't be backed by any evidence" -- I think in such a situation, people shouldn't answer the question then, instead of speculating. When I asked the question, my guess was that printing was a common operation that you'd like to do, so in ~20 years of templates, it would've come up at some point for the committee and I just couldn't find it. Hence I asked... – theindigamer Nov 30 '18 at 12:31
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    @theindigamer: I totally agree: People shouldn't answer with speculations. That's why the question gets closed. Unfortunately, it didn't happen fast enough. – BDL Nov 30 '18 at 12:36
  • To clarify - (1) if people can only provide speculative answers to a question today, but might be able to provide concrete answers in the future (e.g. I could literally ask the committee in a conference panel), that means the question should be closed? and (2) what is "it" in your last statement "unfortunately, it didn't happen fast enough"? Do you mean the question didn't get closed fast enough? – theindigamer Nov 30 '18 at 12:40
  • @theindigamer: (1): I'm not so sure that even the committee can answer your question. If that topic never came up, then even they might just be speculating why it isn't added. Keep in mind that if you want official answers from someone involved in the design of a specific language, SO is not the right place. We expect questions a random expert in that language can answer. (c by Erik von Asmuth) (2): Yes, the question wasn't closed fast enough. – BDL Nov 30 '18 at 12:43
  • Gotcha'. Could you add the line "Keep in mind that if you want official answers from someone involved in the design of a specific language, SO is not the right place. We expect questions a random expert in that language can answer." to your answer, preferably with emphasis? I think it is pretty important. Thanks for your help. – theindigamer Nov 30 '18 at 12:46
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    "There might've been public discussions about it, but if there are, that implies you haven't done your research." That statement suggests that any research attempt is guaranteed to lead to said public discussions, a sentiment I summarily disagree with. There are a number of resources that it takes an expert knowing about their existence and knowing the right search criteria to find. Not all of these discussions are as readily discoverable as Stack Overflow itself is. I don't think it's reasonable to expect every user to be able to find something right away just because it exists. – BoltClock Nov 30 '18 at 17:23
  • (I'm commenting here since Erik deleted their answer.) – BoltClock Nov 30 '18 at 17:24
  • @BoltClock agree. I removed the sentence. If Erik thinks it's good to have it he can edit it back in. – BDL Nov 30 '18 at 19:53

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