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This question already has an answer here:

As it is right now, I feel... confused. Actually, I can't tell if I'm being dumb or not or wasting the time of whoever reads this.

Alright, straight to the point, I've been on SO for about a few weeks, posted some questions, got a mixed reception, a lot of my reputation is from deleting minus-voted posts, and I was just thinking, why are my dumb questions getting more positive feedback than my more problematic ones?

How about some e x a m p l e s?

Let's look back at my first post: Pygame, the window becomes irresponsive when I try to click it

I said that I'd gone around EVERYWHERE I could find, but nothing was working. I've still got that problem in that project. And that's the ONE THING I actually want to fix, it took me about a month to make the basic code for it. (I based it off a command line version I was also making)

How about another?

Another post which I deleted a few days ago (idk I have no sense of time) did particularly bad, it was asking why some items wouldn't print from a list (it was python, my main language) and I put a link to my GitHub as the full code was in multiple files, and the help pages said that if code is in multiple files, link it to GitHub or something, then I got a comment saying that the site was for specific questions, not multiple files, so I edited the post to add where the problem may have been, I got another comment which appeared to try to help, but I couldn't understand it. It got closed as off topic and I eventually just deleted it, and decided to find the answer myself. Still haven't though.

Now for a dumb question: just 1-2 days ago I asked this: I tried to draw a rectangle in Pygame but the colour is flickering...why? and the answer was literally common sense I realised, I accepted a Best Answer as thanks and to say "hey this works" and then gave myself a mental facepalm. Thing is, that post has the most upvotes on my account. Even though it was probably the dumbest error I've made that isn't a typo.

Is there something I've missed? I am a relatively new user, still getting to grips with this whole SO thing. And I just read some "SO is unwelcoming" posts.

I guess I'm trying to say, what's the logic behind the community response to dumb common sense questions vs problematic ones?

Well,

Logic.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Blackwood, jhpratt, usr2564301, Michael Gaskill Nov 26 '18 at 22:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • Ah, I should check that out then...(checks it out)...Hmm, I'm asking more about community response than reputation points. But, maybe. – Eleeza Nov 26 '18 at 21:13
  • The more people that view the question, the more than vote on it. If you ask a question that people think they can answer, they're more likely to visit it, and vote on it. – Kevin B Nov 26 '18 at 21:18
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  • @Makoto Lol I have no idea what a nuclear reactor is but, ok, I'm checking out that link...law of triviality, huh? Well that explains why people make big deals of small stuff. – Eleeza Nov 26 '18 at 21:19
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    @KevinB And I guess that if a question is unanswerable, then, by the same logic, they'd downvote it. Logic exists, and it is sometimes illogical. – Eleeza Nov 26 '18 at 21:21
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    So— by popular vote, this has evolved into a site where you can ask your easy questions. That is actually a useful tidbit of information. Cynical, but useful. – usr2564301 Nov 26 '18 at 21:53
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    Perhaps the problem is one of searchability and the explanation of the problem. In your first example you give a listing of code and a lot of extra text (we don't need your life story, just what the problem is and how to reproduce just the issue you're having. Using professional English is also nice (the word is I'm, a contraction of "I am", not "im". Because of the lack of text describing the problem and steps you've taken to fix it, people won't find it when they search for a similar issue. People also don't generally like having to extract the issue over comments. – Heretic Monkey Nov 26 '18 at 22:05
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    Whoever told you that questions which require multiple files in order to provide an MCVE are off-topic is telling you lies. In the electron tag a debugging question requires at least the main.js and package.json files. These files usually aren't overly long, but they are still more than one file. Also I would like to know where you found something that says you should link to your github repo when there is more than one file. That is also very wrong. Questions should be self-contained, so all code necessary to understand the problem should be in the question itself. – user4639281 Nov 27 '18 at 0:34
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    @ele Usually, too hard questions are not downvoted. Personally, I only downvote if there is an actual problem (no mcve, unclear, image of code, etc) – user202729 Nov 27 '18 at 4:39
  • A single post with 2 upvotes has no statistical significance with reference to your observation. – jpp Nov 27 '18 at 14:27
  • @jpp Well then I guess it may just be me? I honestly don't know, maybe I should browse around a bit? – Eleeza Nov 27 '18 at 15:03
  • @Eleeza, Maybe somebody lost their keys. – jpp Nov 27 '18 at 15:05
  • @jpp That seemed like the randomest thing until I read it. I never realised... – Eleeza Nov 27 '18 at 15:16

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