19

I often see questions where OP used a variable-length array in C++ code, and gets scolded for it with comments like

VLAs are not supported in C++, don't use them

Your code doesn't compile, post your real code

Use vectors instead of VLA

While these comments are usually technically true, I imagine that OPs cannot extract value from them:

  • "VLA" is a technical acronym, which looks like "WTF" for non-advanced programmers
  • OP doesn't understand why people say that the code doesn't compile, while it clearly does (e.g. when OP uses gcc)
  • When debugging something that doesn't work, OP is reluctant to change unrelated code which does work for him

So, what to do in these situations?

Should I add a comment, and point people to some question and answer which explains what VLAs are and why not use them in C++? (example: Don't use VLA is C++; see reasons here)

Should I add a comment which writes why VLAs are OK in this particular case?

Should I ignore this and move on, as we usually do?

  • 5
    Rule #1: Don't talk about VLA's in C++. Rule #2: See Rule #1. On a serious note now, this seems like yet another circumstance where folks point out a non-standard or almost-officially-non-recommended thing to do, such as C's don't cast malloc. There also seems to be a canonical question for this one too. – E_net4 wishes happy holidays Nov 22 '18 at 22:25
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    Does the virtually canonical "Don't cast malloc" comment contain an explanation of what "cast" means? You are at liberty to at least assume some pre-existing knowledge from the OP. If they comment back "uh what's vla xplain plz" then you have every right to dismiss the entire question as lacking the necessary minimal background knowledge. – usr2564301 Nov 22 '18 at 23:01
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    @usr2564301 Actually, as VLAs are in no way part of C++ (and optional in C11) it's perfectly reasonable for someone asking questions tagged C++ (and arguably C) to not know the meaning of the term. When I comment on them, I always say something like "dimension of an array must be a compile-time constant". – Neil Butterworth Nov 22 '18 at 23:03
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    @usr2564301: "If they comment back "uh what's vla xplain plz" then you have every right to dismiss the entire question as lacking the necessary minimal background knowledge." I disagree. I had used C++ for years before I'd ever heard of VLAs. Someone in a pure C++ world that doesn't interact with C-isms (especially one reliant on Visual Studio as a primary or sole C++ compiler, since no version of that supports them) may well have never encountered this C construct before. – Nicol Bolas Nov 22 '18 at 23:03
  • The question states that people are using VLAs in C++, so that knowledge must have come from somewhere. A plausible reason is that these are programmers moving up from C. – usr2564301 Nov 22 '18 at 23:09
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    @usr2564301 An even more plausible reason is that they are being badly taught. Look at the number of questions about turboc++ and that bits header nonsense. And anyway, VLAs are optional in C, and will hopefully eventually be deprecated. – Neil Butterworth Nov 22 '18 at 23:10
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    Actually, the syntax is straightforward, so I imagine people come up with this without knowing any details. I mean: if int array[10] works, but I want the size to be an input from the user, then it's natural to do std::cin >> n; int array[n]; without knowing that this code is problematic. – anatolyg Nov 22 '18 at 23:13
  • 2
    @anatolyg True. All of this would go away if GCC didn't enable all of their crappy extensions by default, and applied the highest warning levels instead. I have no idea why they ever did that. – Neil Butterworth Nov 22 '18 at 23:16
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    It is just normal. Every C++ compiler has non-standard extensions to help programmers write practical programs. That normally makes it pretty crucial that a questioner also tags his question with a tag that describes the compiler or at least mentions it. But that is taboo for some unfathomable reason. C++ has lots of taboo. Life is easier when you see somebody use a VLA, cuts down on the number of possible compilers and helps you write a better answer. – Hans Passant Nov 22 '18 at 23:50
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    @nicol Not kmowing the term is fine, but not looking it up before asking is definitely not ok. – user202729 Nov 23 '18 at 1:16
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    @user202729: If you aren't even aware that variable length arrays aren't just how arrays work, that this is some special thing separate from regular arrays, how would you know to look it up? Yes, we should expect research out of people, but it's unreasonable to expect clairvoyance. – Nicol Bolas Nov 23 '18 at 1:25
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    Sure, they are just not used very often. Not all compilers have the extension, ones with a 1-800 support phone number don't. Blowing the stack is okay when you need to get it from a web site called SO :) Controversial, they had to make it optional again in C11. – Hans Passant Nov 23 '18 at 1:29
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    If you see an acronym you don't understand, Google it and find out what it means. Gosh, is this really difficult? Can we really not expect people to be able to manage this? My three year old knows how to look things up using Google. – Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 23 '18 at 17:13
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    @LightnessRacesinOrbit does your 3 yo really know how to use Google? If so, that's pretty amazing :) – Yvette Colomb Nov 25 '18 at 1:54
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    @YvetteColomb Many do nowadays. It's what they're brought up with. I'm not necessarily happy about that ^_^ – Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 26 '18 at 10:37
25

The "problem" is essentially cultural. C programmers hate being given ostensibly C questions that clearly are written by moronic C++ programmers with their C++-isms like overcasting things. And C++ programmers hate being given ostensibly C++ questions that are clearly written by moronic C programmers with their C-isms.

Add to this the fact that VLA's are not mere idioms of C; they're straight-up not part of C++ period. The code is not C++, as conforming compilers are not required to compile it.

Because of the latter point, C++ programmers will tend to draw their knives on any "C++" question involving VLAs unless the asker makes it explicitly clear that they know that VLAs are a compiler extension. And given the number of C++ users that accidentally stumble into VLA usage, these questions have happened so much that people are tired of having to explain this for the 1001th time.

I'm not sure there is much to be done here. Non-deliberate VLA usage (ie: the asker doesn't know what that means or that it's not legal C++) makes any C++ program non-reproducible on compilers that don't support that extension. So telling someone they can't compile the MCVE is not unreasonable.

Maybe it's easiest to just explain it in some kind of stock comment: "Your question is using Variable Length Arrays (Type variable_name[not_a_constant]; declarations), which are not actually part of C++. They are an on-by-default GCC extension, which means your code will not compile on some other compilers. Did you intend to use this feature? If so, please state this in the question."

  • 14
    This answer conflicts me, I don't know if to upvote or downvote. It contains truth, and I don't like it one bit. C/C++ developers are not special, they need to be nice too like the rest of us. For established languages with a very long lifespan that comes with the burden of repeating yourself, so be it. – Gimby Nov 23 '18 at 9:09
  • @Gimby You might want to format your thoughts as an answer, if you think there is a better solution. I don't see how your idea of "burden of repeating yourself" is different from what Nicol's answer suggests, so maybe you should clarify. – anatolyg Nov 23 '18 at 9:25
  • @anatolyg Well that's fair enough, indeed the given suggestion is to be the better person. Dealing with tag culture is for another meta post. – Gimby Nov 23 '18 at 9:54
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    If so, please state this in the question. => Would you recommend so even if it does not matter? I'm loathe requesting a myriad of changes/clarifications from the OP that are not necessary to answer the question. On the one hand, guiding the OP toward better code sounds helpful, but on the other, I am afraid a beginner will just feel overwhelmed by all those points that are not helping their immediate problem. – Matthieu M. Nov 23 '18 at 15:54
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    @MatthieuM.: "Would you recommend so even if it does not matter?" Yes. Because 1) it's supposed to be an MCVE; if it really didn't matter, why is it there? Also, we don't always know what "matters" when dealing with issues of this sort. 2) C++ users on SO who see VLAs in a question will comment about them. Pre-emptively stopping that is good. 3) It makes it clear to any reader of the question that you're using non-standard C++ that they should only emulate if they're willing to use non-standard C++ too. We don't want to advertise !C++ as being C++. – Nicol Bolas Nov 23 '18 at 15:58
  • Ironically, most questions involving VLA are low quality homework questions. Some std::cout << "Please enter your birthday" stuff. So practically downvote+closevote+move-on is the best solution. – llllllllll Nov 24 '18 at 15:07
  • Hmm. I'm not a C or C++ guy and might be missing something, but I share @MatthieuM.'s discomfort with what you propose here. If the VLAs don't matter to the question, it seems best to just edit the MCVE to not use them (thereby making it work on any compiler), not just to note that the OP used them intentionally. If they are relevant, because it's a question about VLAs, then the note seems superfluous. And if a commenter is unsure if they're relevant, because they don't fully understand the question, then they shouldn't be giving the OP instructions about how to change it. – Mark Amery Nov 25 '18 at 18:48
  • @MarkAmery: "If the VLAs don't matter to the question" How would you, or the OP, know if VLAs are relevant without knowing the answer to the question? "they shouldn't be giving the OP instructions about how to change it" The point of the comment is not to necessarily get the OP to change the question. The point is to inform readers of the question that a non-standard feature is being used. – Nicol Bolas Nov 25 '18 at 19:18
  • @NicolBolas "How would you, or the OP, know if VLAs are relevant without knowing the answer to the question?" - by trying to remove them and seeing if the behaviour being asked about persists. That's a large part of the merit of an MCVE; somebody who knows the answer to a debugging question may be able to answer it without even seeing an example by psychically inferring what the OP's code must've looked like, but an MCVE helps folks who don't know the answer, by letting them verify the behaviour being asked about and experiment with the code. – Mark Amery Nov 25 '18 at 19:28
  • @NicolBolas (Indeed, if it weren't possible to systematically determine what parts of the code are relevant to a debugging question and eliminate the cruft without first knowing the answer to the question, it would be impossible for most askers of debugging questions to trim their code down to an MCVE at all. The fact that we do in fact demand that askers trim down their code to an MCVE suggests to me that we have fairly universally agreed that the ability to roughly figure out what parts of an example are relevant is a skill we can reasonably expect of people who participate on SO.) – Mark Amery Nov 25 '18 at 19:32
  • @MarkAmery: I'm sorry, but that's kind of an absurd standard for a circumstance where the OP doesn't even know that VLAs are a thing. It's like saying that a user should change their int function parameters to short, long, and long long, just in case there's a problem with them being an int. Or that they should convert int t[5]; declarations into std::array<int 5> t; declarations, just in case there's an issue with implicit conversions, which is a concept the user doesn't even know exists. – Nicol Bolas Nov 25 '18 at 20:34
  • @MarkAmery: To the user, it's just normal syntax. They don't know there's anything special about it. – Nicol Bolas Nov 25 '18 at 20:34
  • @NicolBolas Right, so they may need that point explained to them in the comments (or may need a third party to make the edit). That doesn't change what the desired end state for the question should be. If VLAs are irrelevant, it shouldn't include them, since they'll just make it harder to reproduce what the question is asking about on compilers other than GCC. If the question is about them, then while it may be worth calling out that they're GCC-specific for the sake of future readers (e.g. "I don't understand behaviour foo of this code that uses GCC's variable-length-arrays"), a ... [1/2] – Mark Amery Nov 25 '18 at 20:46
  • [2/2] ... comment saying that the OP deliberately used VAAs doesn't help anybody; it's just a "please don't downvote me, I know what I'm doing, honest!" comment edited into the question that doesn't help anyone understand the question nor even serve your stated purpose of making it clear to naive readers that VLAs in C++ are a GCC extension. If it's unreasonable to expect askers to know about VLAs in advance, that may be a reason to be merciful when deciding whether to downvote them, but surely it doesn't change what we ultimately want their question to end up looking like once they do know? – Mark Amery Nov 25 '18 at 20:47
  • @MarkAmery: "a comment saying that the OP deliberately used VAAs doesn't help anybody" Again, I go back to the int/short thing. The fact that they deliberately used int in their code does not mean that using short would be more "minimal", unless that is part of the bug. If their code deliberately used VLAs, and the VLAs are not directly part of the problem, that doesn't mean it should be removed. Especially since the substitute might use something they're not using (like vector) or inserting bugs (forgetting to delete a dynamically allocated array). – Nicol Bolas Nov 25 '18 at 21:14
13

Some things are just an ancillary cost of endeavoring to be a helpful tutor / mentor in certain languages.

I used to get really irritated at haphazard 'solutions' posted to the site containing type-punned pointers during the years I was working on very strict platforms. HEATHENS! I won't reveal the name I used when I quite colorfully requested that compilers at least throw a warning when people do that sort of thing on the GCC developer mailing list. -Wall at the time didn't do it.

And I know, all too well, the perils of helping someone debug only to finally get a look at their makefile and realize -D _GNU_SOURCE was altering my cherished POSIX behavior (which they turned on for some completely unrelated string issue), as I left my desk to weep and snuggle up with my favorite cheese grater.

And is still trying to beat the use of the long-deprecated MySQL extensions out of the industry.

All you can do is politely point out that VLAs only exist in an unstable dimension that spawns during the generation of intermediate output by their compiler, and all those who dare to venture there should be treating it as an event horizon with spaghettification likely to ensue.

Or you could put it a bit more mildly, like letting them know that their code only compiles because of a third-party feature that their compiler enables by default, and point to the estimated number of chickens that passed away in the last hour as urgency to read the helpful link you include or ...

Well, perhaps something less dire than that, too. But just realize that they're learning by doing and that's something we ought to consider worthy of a degree of politeness that's slightly onerous to muster in the face of such frustration, but worth it in the long run, and just lead by example by being calm and helpful.

  • 1
    This goes for all languages and topics: "...lead by example by being calm and helpful" – TecBrat Nov 24 '18 at 23:54
4

If VLAs are relevant:

If the VLA is related to the problem they are experiencing, say so in an answer.

Otherwise:

Answer the question. Optionally, tell them VLAs are evil, either in your answer or in a comment.

Don't:

  • Close the question unless it meets some other criteria for closure (yes, it's not "standard" C++, but that does not make it off-topic, it's still a programming question!).
  • Remove the VLA in an edit (could change the behavior of their code or accidentally "fix" their problem altogether).
  • It should be closed as a duplicate. – philipxy Nov 24 '18 at 10:17
3

I'm fairly new to SO, and certainly not great at C / C++. As a result, I strongly support answers pointing out issues like this, even if they are not necessarily the cause of the problem that the OP is experiencing. SO goes to great lengths to make questions and answers be of high quality, for the sake of posterity. You do not simply answer a question to help the OP, you answer to help the OP and anybody else who might stumble upon this question in future.

Many of us use SO to learn to code, particularly to learn best practice. If issues like this are not raised, morons like me will look at the question and come to the implicit conclusion that there is nothing wrong with VLAs in C++. I can see why some would view it as somewhat pedantic, but I'd prefer an answer to be pedantic and rigorously correct, to ensure that I, and others, do not use bad code as a resource from which to learn.

1

While these comments are usually technically true, I imagine that OPs cannot extract value from them:

  • "VLA" is a technical acronym, which looks like "WTF" for non-advanced programmers
  • OP doesn't understand why people say that the code doesn't compile, while it clearly does (e.g. when OP uses gcc)
  • When debugging something that doesn't work, OP is reluctant to change unrelated code which does work for him

So, what to do in these situations?

When VLA use is in fact part of the problem, then of course it's natural and appropriate to discuss it in a comment or answer.

But I suppose you're focusing on cases where VLA use is (probably) not part of the problem, i.e. where the OP is using a compiler that supports them as an extension, and where the use does not appear to contribute to the misbehavior that is the actual subject of the question. Even so, I see absolutely no problem in that case with comments pointing out the use of an extension and recommending against it -- that sort of thing is very natural on SO.

In either case, if one is going to write such a comment then it is to be hoped that it will be worded as helpfully as possible. For example, I tend to spell out "variable-length array" at least once when I talk about that feature. In the same vein, it is a bit disingenuous to complain generally about the code not compiling if you know very well that the compilation failure arises specifically and only from VLA usage. Be careful about judging others' comments, though -- they might not recognize the problem as clearly as you do.

Should I add a comment, and point people to some question and answer which explains what VLAs are and why not use them in C++? (example: Don't use VLA is C++; see reasons here)

Even when it is not directly related to the OP's problem, it is useful to them to be alerted that they are writing non-standard code. If you are inclined to do so, and no one else already has done, then I would favor writing a comment explaining the problem. I'm not so sure it requires a reference to another question, but if you know one that provides a useful discussion then linking it in a "for more information, see ..." sense sounds like a nice touch.

Should I add a comment which writes why VLAs are OK in this particular case?

I don't see why that would be a good option. It seems likely to elicit contrary comments from folks who disagree that VLA use in C++ is ever OK. Why invite that fight when it isn't even germane to the question being posed?

Should I ignore this and move on, as we usually do?

That's a perfectly valid thing to do, of course, but I'm in no way prepared to assert that it's the only appropriate response.

-2

If the problem is that people who answer questions consider C++ with VLA enabled to be essentially a different language (as postulated in @NicolBolas' answer), then I would think that the answer is simple: make a new tag (e.g. ) and retag the questions.

Advantages:

  1. People who watch won't see these questions after the retag.
  2. People can ignore the whole class of questions.
  3. The tag wiki and excerpt can explain what VLA are and why people may not want to use them.
  4. And also when the advantages might outweigh the disadvantages.
  5. People can retag rather than post not helpful comments.
  6. People who want to answer these questions can watch the new tag.
  7. People who ask these questions will get a higher answer to comment ratio.

The only disadvantages would seem to be

  1. A smaller group of people will see them. This may reduce answers as well as comments.
  2. People asking these questions will probably not know to use the tag, requiring a retag edit.
  3. It may be harder to relate VLA questions to other C++ questions with the same underlying problem.

These disadvantages seem comparatively small against the advantages. The overall effect should be to make the site more helpful and welcoming to people who are beginners in C++. At the same time, it makes the site less cluttered for people who are experienced in C++ while making it easier for them to essentially comment, "Variable Length Arrays are a compiler-specific extension to the language, not standard, so this code may not compile on many compilers."

I am assuming here that the will be replaced with (or whatever the new tag would be). This would be consistent with how questions are tagged; no . Adding the new tag to the existing tags instead would also be helpful but less so.

This solution is essentially a stronger version of a standard comment with helpful links. It's also slightly easier to do. Just hit tag edit and start typing vla and it will give appropriate suggestions. No prior setup needed other than creating the tag.

I don't have strong feelings about what the tag should be named. If a consensus develops around this proposal, a new question could examine potential names. E.g. . Or just more aggressive use of .

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