25

I have a question along related lines, but not identical, to Can we have proper formatting for console output? and Should I prefix example Python code with ">>>" to indicate running in the interpreter? . My question is specifically about interspersing code and its console output, in a way that could generalize to longer code segments.

Background

Often I want to show both console input and output in a Stack Overflow question or answer. I'm looking for a markdown strategy or convention that is easy to type, clear and unambiguous.

Here's a Python example. Let's say that Alice does it this way:

>>> a = first_stage()
>>> print(a)
1.234
>>> b = next_stage(a)

Hopefully it's obvious that the >>> is the Python prompt, that anything following it is what you're supposed to type at the Python prompt, and that the lines without >>> are what you should consequently see as console output. It's often useful to show intermediate outputs like this, to help in understanding the flow of a question or answer. This convention works OK but of course it makes it annoying to copy, paste and try the code (the >>> have to be deleted by hand), and sometimes it's helpful to intersperse console output in fairly long pieces of code rather than just a few short test lines, which is also why the approach in https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/310915/ isn't always ideal

Here are some more ideas. Bob does it like this:

a = first_stage()
print(a)
# 1.234

and Charlie does it like this:

a = first_stage()
print(a)  # 1.234

Now you can copy-paste the code, but clearly there are still potential drawbacks: in Bob's version, you just have to hope that the reader understands that the # wasn't literally printed; in Charlie's, you hope they understand that the comment is console output and not a comment about the command that produced it, and you also can't handle multi-line output. And so on. Nothing I've tried is quite satisfactory under a wide range of circumstances.

My Questions

Are there good existing conventions? Or existing interface functionality or markdown tricks that help do this without too much effort? I could imagine a two-column table with code left and output right, but I believe SO markdown doesn't allow tables and can only imagine unwieldy syntax for them relative to what I'm looking for.

If not (and to save this question from being considered an entirely opinion-based comparison of possible styles): should SO implement a canonical solution for this broadly-applicable feature?

  • 15
    Can someone explain how this is off-topic because it is not about SO? – Alexei Levenkov Nov 20 '18 at 22:05
  • I think everything you showed is just fine. I personally don't have much REPL assistance and need to use a separate code-block to show output, that works too when your code is more substantial. – Hans Passant Nov 20 '18 at 22:14
  • 6
    @AlexeiLevenkov I think people just saw a long post with a title that sounded like a programming question and code blocks, and they incorrectly assumed this belonged on SO. I've updated the title to emphasize this is about Stack Overflow editing conventions. – ryanyuyu Nov 20 '18 at 22:54
  • 8
    It bemuses me that there are 2 votes to close this post as opinion-based. Isn't pretty much half on Meta an opinion, even if it's an interpretation of guidelines? – jpp Nov 20 '18 at 23:15
  • 11
    @jpp from the little I’ve seen, Meta seems pretty gladiatorial that way. A downvote, a close vote, a dismissive comment, a DoS attack and maybe a couple of half-decent death threats are just part of the standard welcome package. – jez Nov 21 '18 at 4:03
  • @jpp You'd argue that that close reason should be removed on meta? I think it is still appropriate. Some discussions about guidelines are fine, but some are just simply a matter of personal preference that no guideline could or even should try to govern. Hence, primarily opinion based. Like, in my opinion, this question. – yivi Nov 21 '18 at 9:32
  • @yivi, I'd argue more the description underneath it needs rewording. Some completely opinion-based questions are good ones. I'm not going to propose an alternative, because that's a minefield and there's likely no solution which will satisfy everyone. – jpp Nov 21 '18 at 9:35
  • What I see people doing pretty often is to just label their output as output. It's a little wordier but you don't have to worry about someone being confused about what it is. – BSMP Nov 21 '18 at 22:06
  • 1
    It is not uncommon to want to highlight some portion(s) of the code that are interesting, and the basic Markdown doesn't allow for that. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 22 '18 at 19:41
6

I use both of the methods you showed, especially the prompt convention for Python. But I might prefer to go for full explicitness:

a = 0.1000
print(a)
# Prints: 0.1

For longer output, the multi-line equivalent:

print(list(range(100)))
# Prints:
# [0, 1, 2, 3, ...]
  • 1
    It's deceptively simple/obvious but I probably like the # Prints:\n# ... approach best of all the suggestions here. Firstly, including that verb lets the comment explicitly play the semantic role of a code comment, at the same time as showing the output. Secondly, that prefix line clearly establishes the convention that whatever follows will be prefixed with # (i.e. that these two characters are not part of the output). The only thing that output-as-comment-lines approaches make difficult is copy-pasting the output itself (if that's ever desirable). – jez Nov 22 '18 at 20:24
  • @jez, thanks. If the output is more than one line and needs to be copy-pastable, then embedding it in a separate display block is the way to go. (If it's one line it's easy enough to start the selection after the comment symbol :-)) – alexis Nov 23 '18 at 14:13
9

Sometimes, I use <pre> for output:

    a = first_stage()
    print(a)
<pre>
1.234
</pre>
    b = next_stage(a)

resulting in:

a = first_stage()
print(a)
1.234
b = next_stage(a)

But this is more useful for larger blocks, where I actually want do disable syntax highlighting, and where the presence or absence of syntax highlighting makes it obvious what is code and what is output.


For smaller outputs, it might be a better idea to format them as quotes:

    a = first_stage()
    print(a)

> 1.234

    b = next_stage(a)

resulting in:

a = first_stage()
print(a)

1.234

b = next_stage(a)

This will break the formatting of the console output, if it relies on using a monospace font. (And code-inside-quote is possible, but looks silly.)

  • 9
    You can also use normal code blocks and just toss an unindented HTML comment (<!-- -->) between the sections you want to separate. – Fund Monica's Lawsuit Nov 21 '18 at 17:15
  • 3
    There is absolutely no need to use pre-tags. If you want no code-highlight, use <!-- language: lang-none -->. – Mark Rotteveel Nov 21 '18 at 18:17
  • 3
    That's more typing … – CL. Nov 21 '18 at 19:43
  • 1
    @CL. not if you master the art of copy&paste. – Holger Nov 22 '18 at 10:04
  • The main reason why I don't like this convention is that if I want to run the code myself I can't simply copy/paste it into my editor and run it, as the output will be interpreted as code and potentially cause errors. This is why I always comment out output. – AkselA Nov 22 '18 at 12:58
  • Markdown has its own comments - <% %> - even short than HTML ones. – Tim Nov 23 '18 at 20:11
7

Document the block like it is source code

The way I normally handle this is all example output/explanations are included as comments (as if I was documenting the actual source code) so that the entire block can be copy-paste-execute.

a = first_stage()
print(a) 
#1.234
b = next_stage(a)

This way, anyone who can read the code can tell what is code and what isn't, and the person copy-pasting doesn't have to purge the explanations if they don't want to. This is also a strategy that works across all languages, and usually how people are used to seeing documentation. And since comments are informal, you can be as simple or detailed as you like. Since the comment part is obvious, and the context of a print is obvious, no one should have any problem telling 1.1234 is the output if it's in a comment followed by or is on the same line as a print.

  • The only problem I have with this is the comment gets greyed out for some languages (e.g. Python), to the extent that spotting nuances in the output is... tedious, if not painful. – jpp Nov 22 '18 at 2:02
  • @jpp That would be a SE CSS issue, that I'm surprised wasn't something that got fixed immediately. Though if it is a problem for the reader, they can easily "override" that CSS by highlighting the text. (specifically the SE "com" css class). – Tezra Nov 22 '18 at 8:15
  • This is already pretty much the convention in the R tag, although usually with a space after the octo for readability, and I think it works rather well. Eg. – AkselA Nov 22 '18 at 13:02
0

Depends on the intent of the post and context

REPL session - If you are literally showing a REPL session, display it that way with a nice label. <pre> tag works well here

Python (or description of environment):

>>> a = 2 + 2
4

Code - If you want to emphasize the code or need help debugging, then write it as code with comments:

a = first_stage()
print(a) # should print 1.234

Code output - If you want to emphasize the output from running code, but still show the code, separate blocks work well:

a = first_stage()
print(a)

Prints:

1.234

0

When the intent of the answer is to say which user input to provide during an interactive session, I'll use bold text within the <pre> block to highlight that input.

<pre>
(gdb) <b>b func</b>
Breakpoint 1 at 0x400580: file s2.c, line 19.
(gdb) <b>set $funcbp = $bpnum</b>
(gdb) <b>commands</b>
Type commands for breakpoint(s) 1, one per line.
End with a line saying just "end".
><b># We don't want to a watchpoint more than once</b>
><b># if func is called more than once,</b>
><b># so we disable the func breakpoint on first use.</b>
><b>disable $funcbp</b>
><b>watch -l x if $_caller_is("func", 0)</b>
><b>commands</b>
 ><b>continue</b>
 ><b>end</b>
><b>continue</b>
><b>end</b>
(gdb) <b>r</b>
Starting program: /home/mp/s2
</pre>
(gdb) b func
Breakpoint 1 at 0x400580: file s2.c, line 19.
(gdb) set $funcbp = $bpnum
(gdb) commands
Type commands for breakpoint(s) 1, one per line.
End with a line saying just "end".
># We don't want to set a watchpoint more than once
># if func is called more than once,
># so we disable the func breakpoint on first use.
>disable $funcbp
>watch -l x if $_caller_is("func", 0)
>commands
 >continue
 >end
>continue
>end
(gdb) r
Starting program: /home/mp/s2
-1

Here's a hypothetical feature proposal that would present code and output interspersed (but clearly visually demarcated) by default, with the option to view either the code alone, or the output alone, allowing either to be copy-pasted and used without modification.

It would require a new feature in the Markdown interpreter, which could be as simple as:

    a = first_stage()
    print(a)
<!-- output -->
    1.234
<!-- code -->
    b = second_stage(a)
<!-- output -->
    This gets printed as a side-effect
    of second_stage()

This could be rendered with the dynamic ability to switch between code, output, and a mixture of both. It might look something like the output of this snippet (disclaimer: I have no doubt that you, the SO developers, and possibly the average labrador would likely do a better job of the actual html/js/css than I have done here - the point I'm trying to illustrate is really the output effect):

function display(displayCode, displayOutput)
{
  var blocks = document.getElementsByTagName("pre");
  for(var i = 0; i < blocks.length; i++)
  {
    if(blocks[i].classList.contains("code")) blocks[i].style["display"] = (displayCode   ? "block" : "none" );
    if(blocks[i].classList.contains("output"))
    {
      var style = blocks[i].style;
      style["display"] = (displayOutput ? "block" : "none");
      style["margin-left"] = (displayCode ? "2em" : "0");
      style["background-color"] = (displayCode ? "#dfe0f1" : "#eff0f1");
    }
  }
}
.mixedCodeBlock {
  margin-bottom:1em;
  padding:5px;
  padding-bottom:20px !ie7;
  width:auto;
  width:650px !ie7;
  max-height:600px;
  overflow:auto;
  font-family:Consolas,Menlo,Monaco,Lucida Console,Liberation Mono,DejaVu Sans Mono,Bitstream Vera Sans Mono,Courier New,monospace,sans-serif;
  font-size:13px;
  background-color:#eff0f1;
}
.output {
  margin-left:2em;
  background-color:#dfe0f1;
}

.selector {
  padding-right: 2em;
  font-size:13px;
}
<div style="margin-top: 1em;">
  <span class="selector" onClick="display(1,1);">Mixed</span>
  <span class="selector" onClick="display(1,0);">Code Only</span>
  <span class="selector" onClick="display(0,1);">Output Only</span>
</div>
<div class="mixedCodeBlock">
<pre class="code">
a = first_stage()
print(a)
</pre>
<pre class="output">
1.234
</pre>
<pre class="code">
b = second_stage(a)
</pre>
<pre class="output">
This gets printed as a side-effect
of second_stage()
</pre>
</div>

  • Event attributes are the devil. Also, why in the world would you use Display = function at all? Also, why do you use a capital first letter for an identifier that does not identify a constructor? Also, why no indentation in the HTML, and such odd use of whitespace in the JavaScript? – user4639281 Nov 23 '18 at 1:17
  • @TinyGiant I'm really looking for feedback about the idea, not to be distracted by the nitty-gritty of the quick and dirty js code I used to illustrate it. In both cases the answer is "I hardly ever use javascript and some of my knowledge may be up to 15 years out of date". – jez Nov 23 '18 at 1:21
  • Oh, well in that case I think this would be a bad idea. – user4639281 Nov 23 '18 at 1:23
  • Thank you for your feedback. – jez Nov 23 '18 at 1:23

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