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I am asking this question because recently one of my edits has been rejected by some users.

What I have done is put all the error paragraph inside a block quote, so that it can be readable.

I am not sure why that edit was rejected?

Edit

This question is closed as duplicate of Should I approve edits to off-topic questions? but the question that I have edited is not off-topic as it is quite clear from the comments under it and the response of the community (as this question is still open). So, I think it should be re-opened.

  • @yivi But that question is not off-topic. – Triyugi Narayan Mani Nov 20 '18 at 10:18
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    It's pretty likely your edit was rejected because the reviewers thought that the question was closable both before and after your edit. Also, try to fix as many problems in a post as you can when suggesting an edit. – yivi Nov 20 '18 at 10:18
  • @yivi It might be but the reason they provided is This edit does not make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability. – Triyugi Narayan Mani Nov 20 '18 at 10:19
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    That's a standard suggested edit rejection. From the point of view of scope and topicality, the reviewers probably thought your edit was superflous. – yivi Nov 20 '18 at 10:21
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    But it is superflous otherwise. Please, follow the link to the suggested dupe and read the whole Q&A. If a question is closable, and your edits wont push the question beyond the closable threshold, do not bother editing. Or, in other words: do not polish turds, since even polished they remain turds. – yivi Nov 20 '18 at 10:28
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    @TriyugiNarayanMani Improving readability on an off-topic post that should be deleted is not an improvement, it's just a waste of resources for everyone. You need to get better at selecting which post you want to edit. :) – ayaio Nov 20 '18 at 10:33
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    @yivi Rather than implicitly accusing Triyugi of not having read the linked question, perhaps you should reread it yourself. It contradicts the position you're giving here. The top answer says, of "closeworthy but potentially salvageable questions": "If the edit substantially improves the post then accept, this leaves the OP will less to do to bring the question on topic". In other words, it argues for accepting edits that substantially improve closeworthy posts even if they don't, on their own, push the question "beyond the closable threshold", to use your words. – Mark Amery Nov 20 '18 at 11:18
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    @yivi It's also worth noting that several other posts on this topic seem to come to slightly more liberal conclusions - namely, meta.stackexchange.com/q/155961/200582, meta.stackoverflow.com/q/274286/1709587, and meta.stackoverflow.com/q/256078/1709587. Some of the answers there outright defend turd-polishing. – Mark Amery Nov 20 '18 at 11:22
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    Besides the point if this question is a turd or not. The suggested edit is for me just too minor. There are plenty of other things that should have been adressed by the editor as well. This edit only fixes 1 out of 10 points on this question. – Luuklag Nov 20 '18 at 11:26
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    @yivi But I don't think reviewers disagree that "closeworthy but potentially salvageable" because (no offence) but one of the reviewer posted this comment as : "The error message is difficult to read. Please format the error message as Code Sample ({}) to preserve line breaks." – Triyugi Narayan Mani Nov 20 '18 at 11:26
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    @yivi I think that reading is a stretch. The other class of questions listed, besides "potentially salvageable", is "spam, completely off topic questions etc", with an example of "how do I learn sowing?". This question is clearly nothing like "how do I learn sowing?"; I'd argue it's clearly not unsalvageable. In fact, while I don't know much about Eclipse or Maven, it's not even obvious to me that it's closeworthy as it stands. Maybe it needs more details about how the asker tried to install their plugin, or maybe it doesn't if that's implicit to someone who knows the ecosystem. – Mark Amery Nov 20 '18 at 11:30
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    @Luuklag In case you don't know, note that the community consensus has been fairly heavily against rejecting edits for being too minor since 2014. Yes, I know some people still do it, but you're going against the grain in doing so. – Mark Amery Nov 20 '18 at 11:33
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    @Mark, I do not believe that reading is a strech by any means. And in the end, neither you, me nor the OP can't guess why the reviewers rejected the edit. I was just trying to help the OP interpret the rejection reason so they had better luck with their suggested edits in the future. I believe my interpretation is likely to be accurate, and that that question is likely to end up closed (it already has a CV, not mine). – yivi Nov 20 '18 at 11:35
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    @yivi The duplicate is wrong. The edit got rejected because OP used quote formatting to format error code instead of code formatting. See the comment one of the reviewers left on the question itself after rejecting the edit: The error message is difficult to read. Please format the error message as Code Sample ({}) to preserve line breaks. – BSMP Nov 20 '18 at 17:01
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    You should use code formatting for error code: The quote formatting doesn't make error code like the one in that question easier to read and generally speaking it doesn't make sense to quote a piece of software the same way you would quote a book or an article. Like howlger said in a comment, code formatting would preserve line breaks and would also put the text in a monospaced font, which is often the original font for errors. This would make it easier to read by displaying it as it originally appeared to the user. – BSMP Nov 20 '18 at 17:09
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Answering the title question,

Is putting errors in block quote wrong while editing?

block-quoting error messages is usually a terrible idea, especially for stack traces like what you block-quoted.

Quote formatting destroys the original line breaks of a stack trace, forcing people to look at the revision before your edit to see them. Worse, it may train posters to block-quote stack traces when posting new questions, in which case there won't be an earlier revision to recover the line breaks from and users will have to ask the questioner to repost the stack trace properly.

Changing the error message formatting wouldn't be enough to make that question a good question, but when you do edit stack traces, the proper thing to do is to code-format them.

  • Quote formatting destroys the original line breaks of a stack trace: It is not all that bad. It just needs </br> at the end of each line of the stack trace. And long lines in the stack trace are then no longer unreadable (in practice). – Peter Mortensen Dec 12 '18 at 14:59
  • @PeterMortensen: Technically true, but in practice, people just hit the quote format button and wreck everything. Also, that kind of edit introduces its own problems with figuring out what the original text was, and it doesn't solve any of the other problems code formatting would solve, like Foo.<init> rendering as Foo.. (My answer focused on the active harm quote-formatting causes, rather than on the problems it doesn't solve, but in retrospect, I probably should have talked about the problems it doesn't solve too.) – user2357112 Dec 12 '18 at 15:57
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While these edits may sometimes be approved, edits that improve little to nothing may be rejected. As the message says:

This edit does not make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability.

Many people think that error messages in block quotes is wrong, so according to some reviewers it would "actively harm readability".

  • This edit does not make the post easier to read. A large jumble of text with no line-breaks doesn't look any better in a block quote than it does plain. The correct thing to do would be to put it into a code block with a language hint of <!-- language: lang-none -->. – user4639281 Dec 12 '18 at 4:46
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According to the summary provided by the users who rejected your edit:

This edit does not make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability.

When you make an edit, especially when you have less than 2k rep, your edits should fix several things in the post. For example you can fix grammar and add some tags.

Your edit fixed one thing that does not make the post easier to read or more accessible. Please try to make more substantial edits in the future.

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    This is wrong. The OPs edit did make the post easier to read and more accessible. And not being complete enough is not an appropriate reason to reject an edit. This does nothing to address the point of the question nor the most likely reason the suggestion was rejected, in my opinion. – yivi Nov 20 '18 at 10:54
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    I agree with DManokhin here. There is still a lowercase I, there is some fluff left in the post. There are words that are capitalized that shouldn't be. Some interpuntion could be added. Plenty of things still left to improve. I'd use the same close reason, as "too minor" isn't a reason. I might as well chose reject and edit and get this out of the queue in the first place. Also the title of the post is the same as the first sentence. – Luuklag Nov 20 '18 at 11:24
  • @Luuklag I think it doesn't mean to correct all mistakes of post in an edit. – Triyugi Narayan Mani Nov 20 '18 at 11:28
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    @TriyugiNarayanMani You should correct ALL problems with a post, especially when suggesting an edit as opposed to doing an edit that doesn't require review. If all problems in this post were solved by suggested edits, one problem at a time, it would take at least 5 suggested edits, taking up time from at least 15 reviewers. – Luuklag Nov 20 '18 at 11:31
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    @Luuklag As a general rule, I'd rather have 5 tiny edit suggestion that take 5-10 seconds apiece to review than one big suggestion that combines all the changes. Combining multiple changes into a single suggestion has a minimal impact on the total review time required, but frequently leads to horrible situations where an edit suggestion contains a mixture of changes I agree with and ones I disagree with, which I then need to spend minutes carefully unpicking in the editor. Yes, reviewer time does matter, but that seems like a strong argument against the protocol you're asking for. – Mark Amery Nov 20 '18 at 15:13
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    @MarkAmery, for me its fairly simple. If there are things that I don't agree with I reject. If the things I disagree with are minor I'd be happy to reject and edit, or approve and edit, depending on the division of stuff I agree with vs stuff I disagree with. I only accept edits that I completely agree with. – Luuklag Nov 20 '18 at 15:18
  • @MarkAmery Another problem with suggesting a tiny edit is that we get suggestions that look like this where it appears the editor made a bunch of weird, bad changes. What actually happened was a 2K+ user fixed all the issues with the post while they only changed code indentation so what gets shown in the queue is their edit undoing all of the earlier corrections. – BSMP Dec 12 '18 at 14:27
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    @BSMP Eh, I don't know enough about how the system handles conflicts to understand how cases like that come about. It's not obvious to me that more thorough edits would tend to lead to less conflict-related problems. If anything, I'd expect more such problems, since the longer that editors spend crafting edits, the greater the odds that two editors will be working on the same post in parallel. – Mark Amery Dec 12 '18 at 14:36
  • @MarkAmery I wasn't suggesting that a longer edit would prevent the conflict but that it when it happened their edit wouldn't appear to be destructive (which is what the other reviewer thought was happening). – BSMP Dec 12 '18 at 15:07
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    @BSMP Except that a) it might still be or appear destructive, since it's unlikely that two editors making extensive edits will choose to fix exactly the same set of issues in exactly the same way as each other, and b) there's a tradeoff between frequency of conflicts and harm done by them: shorter edits will conflict less often but more catastrophically, and it's not at all obvious to me how those two factors weigh up against each other. – Mark Amery Dec 12 '18 at 16:14

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