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I just saw a question that has been put on hold for being unclear. However, it is a very clear question for people who use the question's only tag. I fear that it has been put on hold by people who don't work with the library, which could seem very complex for non-users of optimization and operational management.

Am I right to question the closure? What can someone using a tag of a complex library do to avoid being misunderstood by people who don't work with the library?

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  • 7
    Generally, arguing that the closers don't understand the topic space isn't going to fly. You'd be much better off trying to edit your question and making it clearer. For other questions, you can suggest edits to try to make it clearer, but you need to ensure you're not adding things not mentioned, or changing intent.
    – fbueckert
    Nov 15 '18 at 18:44
  • Then, would explaining and giving definitions of terms help for this particular case? Nov 15 '18 at 18:49
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    Not really. There's been no context provided, so explaining terms won't make the question any clearer.
    – fbueckert
    Nov 15 '18 at 18:49
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    Thanks, I know you can't talk for the closer, but it is hard for me to understand how was this question unclear. Having their view on it would have helped. Nov 15 '18 at 18:52
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    I've pinged the close voters, I assume some of them will comment here or leave an answer. It was reported in SOCVR by FireAlarm: chat.stackoverflow.com/transcript/90230?m=44546279#44546279
    – rene
    Nov 15 '18 at 18:55
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    To me, it sounds like an XY Problem. The asker has a problem, and assumes the solution is to lower the tolerance of the package, so they asks about that. We have no idea what they're trying to do, nor what the root problem is, just what they're trying to get the solution to be. It'd be much clearer (and useful for everybody) if we knew what the problem they're attempting to solve is.
    – fbueckert
    Nov 15 '18 at 18:55
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    As posted, this question is both too broad and unclear and this has nothing to do with whether one uses the library. You can avoid being misunderstood by reading How to Ask.
    – user8682794
    Nov 15 '18 at 19:04
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    @PearlySpencer I disagree there; this is not broad. He wants to change a single parameter in a built-in function. That's highly specific. Admittedly the OP could've done more research and shown what they tried, but this is not broad, nor unclear, and that's without me knowing a thing about the library. There's hardly anything to misunderstand here, it's "How do I change foo's bar-parameter".
    – Adriaan
    Nov 15 '18 at 19:14
  • Ok, while I can't provide the asker's context for them, I can see that I have to be extra careful while posting about complex librairies for myself, to avoid that kind of confusion. Nov 15 '18 at 19:15
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    @Madhur it's not a debugging question, no reproduction is neccessary. It's a how-to question, and those questions do not explicitly require code. Regardless, that isn't the reason used for this question's closure, but rather "unclear what you're asking". It looks fairly clear to me, but I have no experience in the technology at hand.
    – user4639281
    Nov 15 '18 at 19:15
  • @Adriaan I respectfully disagree. But the good news is that we agree that we disagree!
    – user8682794
    Nov 15 '18 at 19:16
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    Future googlers will query for "pyomo change tolerance". And find the one-and-only SO answer from Bethany. If it doesn't get deleted. If it does it is not completely disastrous, there is a Pyomo forum question that talks about it as well. Forums being the place to get obscure answers, how's that for a complete reversal. But at least the visitors know the subject. Nov 15 '18 at 19:27
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I voted to close as unclear, because it's not clear what the question really wants.

The ipopt solver has the following 10 tolerance settings:

  • tol
  • dual_inf_tol
  • constr_viol_tol
  • compl_inf_tol
  • acceptable_tol
  • acceptable_constr_viol_tol
  • acceptable_dual_inf_tol
  • acceptable_compl_inf_tol
  • acceptable_obj_change_tol
  • diverging_iterates_tol

As the question is currently written, it's impossible to determine what the user is really asking about. They probably are asking about tol, but thinking that would just be an educated guess. We should not need to guess.

The alternative is to assume that they are asking about all of the settings. In that case they are basically asking for a tutorial on what those various settings mean, how to use them, and when to use them, which is too broad.

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    Ghe, so this is basically turned around: if you know nothing about the library all you can do is downvote because of a lack of research, whereas if you do know the library, you'd have voted to close. Nice reasoning.
    – Adriaan
    Nov 15 '18 at 19:27
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    Thanks to highlight the fact that it was because you had to guess what tolerance it was about. I think, if it has been me, I would first have asked more details to the asker, since he might not have realized that the "tolerance" term was not giving enough details on what kind of tolerance they wanted to adjust. Nov 15 '18 at 19:39
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    @V.Brunelle Which is exactly why it's closed as unclear.
    – fbueckert
    Nov 15 '18 at 20:01
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    And perhaps, inputs to askers on what is unclear should have been done. What is this reputation used for if you can't comment questions to ask for improvements? Nov 15 '18 at 20:26
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    You can. There's no need to, though; we prefer energy to be spent on questions that are already answerable. That's what the close reason is for; to explain what's wrong with it. But until that happens, it certainly should be closed.
    – fbueckert
    Nov 15 '18 at 20:29
  • Then, it appears to me that if I want serious expert discussions on the subject, I have to stop coming to SO. If you want SO to be turned into an Excel formula forum, turning down serious question with a no effort vote to close on questions that you don't understand is the way to go. Nov 15 '18 at 20:36
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    And here I thought we were making headway. Sad to see that you still think the voters didn't understand. Well, can't change that. Best I can do is re-iterate that SO isn't a forum, isn't trying to be one, and that we have specific quality standards that all posts must meet.
    – fbueckert
    Nov 15 '18 at 20:41
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    @V.Brunelle In an ideal world, the OP would have come back to clarify their question, either in as a result of the closure or in response to a comment asking for such clarification. The OP has visited the site since the closure, so could have already provided clarification, or a comment asking what's not clear, etc. A comment asking for specific things to be clarified might have been beneficial. You would have been just as welcome as anyone else to leave a comment asking the OP for specific clarification.
    – Makyen Mod
    Nov 15 '18 at 20:51
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    However, in my experience, it is very, very rare for a user to clarify their question, at all, after they've received an answer which gives them a solution to the most probable issue (this answer also, by extension, tells the OP the syntax for setting the other tolerances, if that/those were what they really wanted). When OPs do clarify their questions, that's great. We're happy to reopen such questions. After all, the goal is good, on-topic questions that are useful to future visitors.
    – Makyen Mod
    Nov 15 '18 at 20:51
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    OTOH, I do disagree with the question being deleted at this time. IMO, the full 9 days (or so) of "on hold"/"closed" should have been permitted to pass prior to deletion (either automatic deletion, or by vote), in order to permit the OP additional time to clarify their question.
    – Makyen Mod
    Nov 15 '18 at 20:52
  • Ok. I understand. I am not here to defend the asker, It's just scary to see that I can get one of my question closed for the same reasons, without explaining. I also think that close reasons are sometimes not enough, particularly in this case when the asker visibly had no way of knowing how his question could be interpreted in so many ways. I would have been happy to edit my own question knowing what to clarify, and this could have help other users to provide edit for the asker. I mean, the answer was still good and it got deleted. Nov 15 '18 at 21:05
  • Sad to see that you had experience with users not willing to edit their questions to provide clarifications. Nov 15 '18 at 21:09
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    @V.Brunelle Unfortunately, but understandably, the vast majority of users care only about their question being answered sufficiently to solve their problem, and give little, or no, thought to the question and answers being helpful to future visitors. Thus, once they have sufficient information from an answer, they rarely put effort into improving their question. Some, very few, do. Those that do should be strongly encouraged. The portion of OPs that are willing to edit in that situation is also much, much lower for those users with only 1 reputation point (e.g. it's their first question).
    – Makyen Mod
    Nov 15 '18 at 21:29
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    The entire reason that the change of verbiage from <Closed> to <On Hold> in questions was to encourage OP to edit their question. <On Hold> implies that there's still time to make constructive changes & make it clear and answerable to allow us to provide a genuine answer. Closing a question was never intended to be an end-all, it was intended to 1.) Notify OP of issues and 2.) Disallow 'guess' answers until clarification is made. IOW - don't take a closed question personally, just fix it. Nov 15 '18 at 21:53

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