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This question already has an answer here:

Sometimes in a popular API a method is deprecated in favour of another. On many occasions, the syntax itself is unchanged. Here are some examples in :

  • sort deprecated in favour of sort_values
  • sortlevel deprecated in favour of sort_index
  • ix deprecated in favour of loc / iloc

In the particular case where syntax is identical, i.e. there's no fundamental difference in usage, what's the accepted practice?

  1. Post a new answer.
  2. Comment on an existing answer with old syntax / upvote existing comment.
  3. Edit an old answer with a short explanation of the change, mentioning version numbers.

I've seen all of them applied, on their own and in various combinations. In my opinion, (3) is preferable: where syntax is unchanged but there's just a renaming, you aren't changing the author's intent.

However, I often see new answers posted and a weak attempt to have the answer with the old method name downvoted. This, to me, seems disruptive and confusing to visitors, especially since the older syntax answer is less likely to be edited once a new answer is posted, and that older answer is usually already heavily upvoted.


Edit: I think this is a special and different situation versus Good question, old version-dependent answer because it concerns only a trivial change (renaming) as opposed to an update in syntax or functionality. Notably, the most upvoted answers are fundamentally different.

marked as duplicate by Heretic Monkey, Robert Longson, Michael Gaskill, HaveNoDisplayName, Arun Vinoth Nov 13 '18 at 19:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 4
    I think it should be good to do the old/new answer .. where you keep the old one and you add an update with a date telling the syntax has changed. Like that you don't change the old answer and you simply add a new update. So it's more likely the (3) but without changing the old content. – Temani Afif Nov 10 '18 at 10:36
  • 18
    If someone is using an older version of the api, as the OP might be, leaving the original is crucial – D. Ben Knoble Nov 10 '18 at 17:07
  • 1
    @D.BenKnoble, Yep, I don't think anyone's arguing that's not the case. But is it better to post a new answer (without editing the old one), or just update the existing answer with a one-line explanation. If the consensus is always add a new answer, so be it. I don't think the correct approach is clear-cut here. – jpp Nov 10 '18 at 17:26
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    @jpp understood; i misunderstood (3) to be more “replacement” than “addition” – D. Ben Knoble Nov 10 '18 at 17:52
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    The correct approach is "update as the post ages", as the help center clearly explains as an example of when to edit. Remember, this site is strongly a wiki. Don't let crappy made up rules get in the way of improving posts. – Braiam Nov 10 '18 at 18:08
  • how one would track thousands his existing answer and everything that changed about them. this is simply impossible. – 4c74356b41 Nov 12 '18 at 20:54
  • @4c74356b41 the fact that you say "thousands" is proof that you don't even know how many answers are being edited, which I suspect is near, if not at, 0. You are always notified of edits to your answers. – Braiam Nov 12 '18 at 21:56
  • @Braiam You are not "always notified of edits to your answers" – Tiny Giant Nov 12 '18 at 22:52
  • @TinyGiant you are for things that matter meta.stackexchange.com/a/278032/213575 – Braiam Nov 12 '18 at 22:54
  • @Braiam uhmm... that definitely does not say that you are notified for edits that are "too trivial", it actually outright says that you are not... – Tiny Giant Nov 12 '18 at 22:56
  • @TinyGiant apparently you didn't read the entire thing, so I answered my own question with the thresholds. For code, is very unlikely that someone that doesn't know what it is doing to change no more than 2 characters to do something the author didn't meant to do. – Braiam Nov 12 '18 at 22:59
  • @Braiam that still does not validate your assertion that "You are always notified of edits to your answers." And I fail to see how my observation of this can be taken as proof that I "didn't read the entire thing" – Tiny Giant Nov 12 '18 at 23:00
  • @Braiam ??? I'm talking about this: how am I supposed to track thousands of my answer and if they are still valid due to changes in the technologies being discussed in those??? – 4c74356b41 Nov 13 '18 at 5:48
  • @4c74356b41 you don't. You allow people to fix them organically. Or you expect to retain authorship even after you are gone? – Braiam Nov 13 '18 at 10:45
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    Well, this is now just confusing. This question has been marked as a duplicate of one whose most upvoted (+ accepted) answer says the opposite of the one here. – jpp Nov 13 '18 at 22:05
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Ultimately, we're curating a library of content here. We want what looks best from the outside while providing the most accurate and relevant information to readers, and preserving the author's intent.

Relevance is a double-edged sword: on one side you want to keep up with new versions and make sure that people using the newest version will get the most relevant information; but on the other side there are many situations where someone might be stuck using an old version, and you want to make sure they can still get information that is relevant to them.

A couple things to keep in mind:

  • If the content is Community Wiki, just edit the answer to be as relevant and accurate as possible.
  • If the content is not Community Wiki, make sure that you're not putting words (or code) into the author's mouth (so to speak).

In both cases, you should avoid adding overly-verbose explanations to an existing answer, and make sure that any code added is as equivalent to the existing code as possible.

Add a version number for the change, explain the difference, and post the new equivalent of the original suggested solution:

Since version: X.Y.Z

Flibbity flabbity boo bah, bazz fuzz bar. The fizzle fazzles the what-not, so use someCodeStuff instead:

someCodeStuff(bar)

Original content:

...

If a more verbose explanation is warranted or there is a better way of going about it that would deviate too far from the original suggested solution, you should always post another answer to that effect. If the voting system works as intended, such an answer will eventually rise to meet the original if there are many answers.


On Downvoting Good Old Answers

This is just plain wrong, no matter how you cut it. Even if you're "trying to rank content", it's wrong to penalize authors for writing good answers just because they are not applicable to new versions of a library or software.

See also:

  • 5
    While I don't disagree with anything in this answer's prose, I disagree quite strongly with the format you propose in your example. It calls out the edit, which is ugly and needlessly breaks the flow of the answer, and worse, it makes it sound like any explanatory prose in the Original Content: section is irrelevant to people on version X.Y.Z and above. In the case jpp describes - where nothing in the API has changed besides the method name - that's a damaging thing to do; instead, the name change should be flagged in the prose only at the point where the name is first used. – Mark Amery Nov 12 '18 at 12:25
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    @Mark this is going to be one of those highly uncommon situations where I actually disagree with you, and suggest posting an answer to that effect and let community voting do its thing. – Tiny Giant Nov 12 '18 at 16:05
  • Related to the down voting part: What's the policy on down voting previously correct but now outdated answers? – rmaddy Nov 12 '18 at 20:05
  • This answer promotes meta edits. Why the heck this answer promotes it? One would expect an experienced user to know that meta edits are to be avoided like the devil to the cross. – Braiam Nov 12 '18 at 21:58
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    Flibbity flabbity boo bah – Kevin B Nov 12 '18 at 22:23
  • @Braiam it isn't a meta edit. A meta edit would be an edit that adds meta information about the answer itself to an answer. This is an edit that would note a version change, and what changed in that version such that the original solution must be augmented. Not mentioning the version that the change occurred, or not mentioning that a change occurred at all and just replacing the original method with the new method, would be ludicrous and a disservice to the community. One would expect an experienced user to know what does and does not constitute a meta edit. – Tiny Giant Nov 12 '18 at 22:43
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    @TinyGiant As you suggested, I've posted a competing answer: meta.stackoverflow.com/a/376572/1709587 – Mark Amery Nov 12 '18 at 22:55
  • @TinyGiant While I won't defend his unwarranted chastising tone, I'm substantively with Braiam on this one; the detail that makes this a "meta edit" is that you're labeling the content below the divider as "Original Content". That's not the same as having a "Since version X.Y.Z" section and a "Before version X.Y.Z" section; instead, one section is labelled as being from an earlier version of the answer. That meets your own definition of a "meta edit" from your comment above. (All that said, I think meta edits are occasionally reasonable - I just disagree with them in this case.) – Mark Amery Nov 12 '18 at 23:12
  • @Mark I've updated my answer taking into consideration your argument. I agree that the "Original Content" label may have been a bit meta, but am not sure that it is entirely uncalled for when making edits like this. – Tiny Giant Nov 13 '18 at 0:16
  • The important part is that the change is called out in a noticeable manner, because the change itself may be the cause of the problem that future readers are having. – Tiny Giant Nov 13 '18 at 0:32
  • Yeah, so, this is definitely no longer a "meta edit" after your change, but I still dislike it. Your new section labels make the original answer look like it's only relevant to versions older than X.Y.Z. Surely that can't be right for a simple function name change? I agree with "make sure that you're not putting words... into the author's mouth", but this - marking up the author's entire original answer as irrelevant to somebody on the latest version, and sticking your own answer and prose into the top of the answer instead - is about as clear a violation of that ideal as I can imagine. – Mark Amery Nov 13 '18 at 1:18
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    @Mark I'm actually thinking the same thing and that it was better with the original content label. – Tiny Giant Nov 13 '18 at 1:22
0

In the precise scenario you describe - where a method has just been renamed - I would edit the answer to note that fact at the point where the method is referenced, as succinctly as possible, and listing the name that works for the newest version first.

Example 1

Before

Foo bar baz, qwerty uiop. You can do this by calling the make_frobnicated() method, passing it your widget as a parameter. Note that wiggly diddly doo.

After

Foo bar baz, qwerty uiop. You can do this by calling either the frobnicate() method (for FooScript++ 3.0 and above) or the make_frobnicated() method (for versions before 3.0), passing it your widget as a parameter. Note that wiggly diddly doo.

Example 2

Before

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Therefore, with the caveats above, you can do this with the wriggle() method, like this:

worm = new Worm(parameters);
worm.wriggle()

Note that this will perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt.

After

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Therefore, with the caveats above, you can do this with the wiggle() method (for CrawlyScript v7.7 and up):

worm = new Worm(parameters);
worm.wiggle()

... or the wriggle() method (for earlier versions):

worm = new Worm(parameters);
worm.wriggle()

Note that this will perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt.

In the examples above, I've assumed that the method which has been renamed is the main focus of the answer, such that it's reasonable to duplicate entire code blocks or clauses from the answer's prose to reflect the renaming of the method. That's not always the case; the method might instead be a trivial detail within the arc of a larger answer, maybe appearing within some 20-line code block. In that case, I'd recommend instead updating the answer to use the newer syntax and simply mentioning the old syntax in a parenthetical aside, like this:

Before

It should be possible to implement your dancing requirements using a routine something like this...

void makeWormDance(Worm worm) {
    Style wormStyle = this.clothingManager.SEXY_WORM_STYLE;
    Hat sexyHat = this.clothingManager.getHatInStyle(wormStyle);
    Neckgear sexyBowTie = this.clothingManager.getBowTieInStyle(wormStyle);
    Glasses sexyShades = this.clothingManager.getShadesInStyle(wormStyle);
    worm.equipHat(sexyHat);
    worm.equipNeckgear(sexyBowTie);
    worm.equipGlasses(sexyShades);
    Nightclub club = this.nightlifeManager.nearestNightclub(worm);
    worm.enterBuilding(club);
    while (club.isOpen) {
        worm.wriggle();
    }
    worm.leaveBuilding(club);
    worm.enterBuilding(worm.getHome());
    worm.sleep();
}

You may want to add additional validation ensuring that your worm has sufficient energy to dance and raise an exception if your worm is tired, but this should give you the general idea.

After

It should be possible to implement your dancing requirements using a routine something like this...

void makeWormDance(Worm worm) {
    Style wormStyle = this.clothingManager.SEXY_WORM_STYLE;
    Hat sexyHat = this.clothingManager.getHatInStyle(wormStyle);
    Neckgear sexyBowTie = this.clothingManager.getBowTieInStyle(wormStyle);
    Glasses sexyShades = this.clothingManager.getShadesInStyle(wormStyle);
    worm.equipHat(sexyHat);
    worm.equipNeckgear(sexyBowTie);
    worm.equipGlasses(sexyShades);
    Nightclub club = this.nightlifeManager.nearestNightclub(worm);
    worm.enterBuilding(club);
    while (club.isOpen) {
        worm.wiggle();
    }
    worm.leaveBuilding(club);
    worm.enterBuilding(worm.getHome());
    worm.sleep();
}

(Note that, for versions of CrawlyScript prior to v7.7, you should replace .wiggle() with .wriggle() in the code above; the method was renamed to .wiggle() in v7.7.)

You may want to add additional validation ensuring that your worm has sufficient energy to dance and raise an exception if your worm is tired, but this should give you the general idea.

I would advise against calling out the edit, as suggested in Tiny Giant's answer, and in particular would advise against sticking a code block showing the "new way" at the top of the answer before everything the author wrote, since that undermines the original author's choices about what prose should appear before and around the code. Edited-in content should generally be coherently integrated into the answer, not bolted on at the start with its own, independent prose and separated off from the original answer with a divider. If you're going to do the latter, you're essentially turning the old answer into two-answers-in-one, and in that case, you might as well actually post a separate answer.

  • 1
    Definitely a viable proposition, though I personally prefer to see the change information front and center when I'm viewing such answers while looking for solutions to my own problems. I feel that downplaying the difference may mean it gets missed when people are reading through a filter, for whatever that is worth. – Tiny Giant Nov 12 '18 at 22:59
-2

If all you are doing is editing in a textual message about version numbers and not altering code, then that should be encouraged.

If you are altering code or providing updated code...

It depends on the type of post. If it is a Community Wiki (exceedingly rare) then just edit it how you see fit.

If it is your own post, then point 3 makes sense: edit a short explanation of the change, mentioning version numbers as well as including the new version.

If it is not your own post, and not a Community Wiki, then a combo of 1 and 2 makes the most sense. Leave a comment explaining the deprecation, and also post an answer with the new non deprecated version.

-5

The correct approach is "update as the post ages", as the help center clearly explains as an example of when to edit. Remember, this site is strongly a wiki. Don't let crappy made up rules get in the way of improving posts.

Forget the author. He could be dead. We need the answer to be correct and relevant even if the author is long gone. If you keep semantically the same post, it doesn't matter that you change dog to cat. It's functionally the same answer and solves the problem the reader has all the same.

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