The FAQ on "How do I ask and answer homework questions?" had an accepted top community wiki answer from the beginning (Oct 23 '08) that said:

  • Admit that the question is homework. Trying to hide it will just get the question closed faster. Do not use a “homework” tag, but mention it in the question text if relevant (you can structure your question this way: “How can I do …? I'm trying to do this as part of … which is a homework problem. This is my attempt so far: …”).

This paragraph was removed in r8 and promptly restored by the person who wrote the answer originally. This was removed again months later when a different editor removed that paragraph along with another edit and again restored by the original author. The same editor pair removed and restored the content an additional time, and then another editor removed it. Other edits followed, with discussion focused on other points, like if the FAQ content should avoid summarizing points from elsewhere on meta because they could be found elsewhere. This paragraph got removed without substantive discussion on this point.

When it was restored (because there had not been substantive discussion or consensus on this point), it was quickly removed with the edit comment

There is no such rule. We do not create new rules in community wikis. We add them if they exist. If you think there should be such a rule please start a discussion first.

So apparently we remove longstanding rules without discussion, even if they have stood in the FAQ on the topic for years and resisted prior removal, but we don't restore content that was disturbed during unrelated editing without being accused of creating new rules.

In later discussion on a different meta topic, a user who disagreed with that point repeatedly claimed:

You can see that there has been a long consensus that whether or not a question is related to a homework problem is irrelevant to the question...whether homework questions need to be marked as such has been discussed to death and the consensus came to be that homework questions should be treated as any other type of question, and not marked as such.

This meta question is intended to serve as a focal point for that discussion that has allegedly long happened but could not be linked to, beyond discussion of using a tag which was already linked to in the original paragraph giving a different rule about admitting the question is homework.

Should homework questions admit that they are homework?

Note: By asking this question, I am not intending to imply a position either way, but I am intending to start the discussion instead of having to argue about whether or not such a discussion exists and has long ago reached the opposite conclusion to the one that stood for many years in the highly-upvoted FAQ for the topic, and was removed without substantive discussion on that point.

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    I'm not sure how continually referring to the original author strengthens your case; it's a community wiki, so the original author has no greater say than anyone else when it comes to edits. – fbueckert Nov 8 at 16:02
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    Based on the tone and slant of your meta posts here, I disagree with that assertion. I think you are making a case. They don't sound at all neutral. – fbueckert Nov 8 at 16:10
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    Of course, it's okay to not be neutral and to have an opinion on a topic, even when starting a discussion on it. It's just that claiming you have no position and that you're being neutral falls rather flat when your posts and wording show a very clear bias to one view. Just be open about what your opinion is. People can then agree or disagree with it. It's how discussions on meta generally go. – Servy Nov 8 at 16:12
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    @WBT Also, you were linked to posts stating the consensus is that that doesn't belong in the question. You just didn't like them. You can't say people can't, or didn't, provide you with sources, when they both can, and did. – Servy Nov 8 at 16:17
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    @WBT Given that the comments are deleted, I couldn't say why no one linked to past discussions there (or even whether anyone did). Did you ask if there were discussions on the topic, given how opposed you are to it being removed? – Servy Nov 8 at 16:42
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    @WBT I did link you to a discussion stating that there is no need for homework questions to disclosed that they're homework questions, and it had a duplicate it was linked to, and several other questions in comments and in the answer, all on the topic. – Servy Nov 8 at 16:48
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    @WBT The numerous discussions linked all say that whether a question is a homework problem or not is irrelevant, and doesn't belong in the question. They weren't saying that there should be no homework tag but that every single homework question must say, in the question, that it's homework. They said that the homework tag doesn't exist because questions should not be indicating whether they're homework or not because it's just noise. – Servy Nov 8 at 16:57
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    @WBT I linked you to it in your previous meta post, you've been given links in the answer. You can't type "homework" in the search bar without finding a dozen posts on the subject. That one person kept reverting the FAQ when it was changed because that one person didn't like the well agreed on consensus doesn't make them right. – Servy Nov 8 at 17:05
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    @WBT I linked you to posts that specifically said that it's not appropriate for a question to state whether or not it's homework, and that it's noise. Thus, that's demonstrating that the statement that "all homework questions must state that they are homework" is not in line with the community consensus. The questions aren't just about the homework tag. Again, they're not all saying, "Don't use the homework tag, but never forget to mention that a problem is homework". If they did, you would have a point. – Servy Nov 8 at 17:17
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    @WBT That other posts also mention that the homework tag doesn't exist because it's specifically policy that homework questions shouldn't mention that they're homework doesn't make them off topic in a question about whether posts should indicate that they're homework. In fact, it makes them a dead on answer. But hey, you wanted to create yet another duplicate. Congrats. You succeeded. Surprisingly, nothing changed, and you succeeded in getting a bunch of people to repeat, exactly, what was in the numerous duplicates you saw. – Servy Nov 8 at 17:18
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    Good faith can only go so far. All this obstinance and pedantry on requiring a link makes it look like you're trying to push an agenda. For me, the links provided, both here and in your previous question were enough. Making a distinction between tag discussions and actual site policy is playing with semantics, and doesn't move the discussion forward at all. – fbueckert Nov 8 at 17:26
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    And again, all this insistence on what the author wants or does makes zero sense. Who cares!? It's literally irrelevant to the current situation. – fbueckert Nov 8 at 17:28
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    I repeat: semantics and pedantry notwithstanding. Also, he offered a search term which provides way more info. Either way, though, I don't think you're discussing in good faith, so I'll content myself with observing that behaviour, disagree with your case and downvote, and let someone else continue the argument. – fbueckert Nov 8 at 17:30
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    @WBT Apparently no one noticed. Like I've said before, the FAQs aren't kept nearly as up to date as you seem to think they should be. That, and the fact that one person who disagrees with the consensus kept rolling back changes to it when others would fix it to be in line with the community consensus. You keep saying discussion was needed to remove it but there were dozens of discussions on the topic. There wasn't one person changing established policy without it being discussed, rather it was one person reverting the changes every time someone brought it in line with established policy. – Servy Nov 8 at 20:33
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    @WBT Just repeating over and over again that no one has ever discussed whether or not homework questions should be marked as homework, and when you've seen multiple examples yourself, doesn't make it true. It's been proven demonstrably false, many times, that this has been discussed, and even that you knew about those discussions before duplicating it by posting this question. – Servy Nov 8 at 23:10

No, they shouldn't.

What the answer is going to be used for is mostly noise, unless it's directly related to the question.

We don't care if the asker works at NASA or McDonalds. It's not important if this is their first job or if they are still studying.

What matters is that questions follow the site topicality rules, are properly scoped and clearly defined.

  • On a good question, stating that it arises from a homework problem is noise at best, but most likely a distraction.

  • On a bad question, it's an attempt to deflect criticism and judgement with information tangential to the question's quality and topicality.

We shouldn't encourage users to put irrelevant information in their posts, and we should edit it out if we encounter noisy posts.

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    I believe the contention here is the edit war and the subsequent lock on the FAQ – Suraj Rao Nov 8 at 16:00
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    @WBT ok.. but the question itself focused on the arguments that occured in the edit war which led me to believe otherwise – Suraj Rao Nov 8 at 16:05
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    @WBT I think 5 users fighting in a massive rollback war doesn't indicate a lack of consensus In the community, but rather amongst these five users (I know my number isn't necessarily accurate, but you get my point I guess) – Patrice Nov 8 at 22:55
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    @WBT Did I say anything about that? All I said is that five users fighting on a FAQ isn't any indication of a community consensus or LACK of that consensus. It just shows that these five users aren't aligned. As soon as you posted a question for the whole community to see, that consensus was clear, and pointed to numerous other discussions that showed that consensus. Seriously, what more do you want? You are aware that the FAQ doesn't get reviewed by the full community everytime a single thing changes in it? – Patrice Nov 9 at 14:09
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    @WBT There was one user constantly rolling back the content, and you. And since you claim (clearly in bad faith, but you have made the claim nonetheless) that you were just rolling it back because you think every single change to an FAQ should be rolled back unless there is a meta discussion about it, that leaves just one person constantly rolling back the changes. Given that there are dozens of meta discussions on the topic, all with very wide agreement on the topic, one person constantly rolling it back (plus you) doesn't override that. – Servy Nov 9 at 14:12
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    @WBT "I was accused of creating a new rule without on-point discussion" Which you did, for the record. It's not okay to edit an FAQ to suggest guidelines that aren't in line with other discussions. The FAQ isn't the place to suggest new things, as you did. Of course, the removal of the statement that homework questions must disclose that they're homework is not changing policy. It has been long and well established policy that homework questions should not disclose that they're homework. There was no need to discuss it again before changing the FAQ. – Servy Nov 9 at 14:58
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    @WBT I linked to numerous discussions all saying that homework questions shouldn't disclose in any way that they're homework. And that because of this, the homework tag was removed. Those numerous discussions were ally very clear, with overwhelming support, that homework questions shouldn't disclose that they're homework at all, because it's noise, and that you should remove any reference to it from the question. They're exactly on point, and demonstrate that the FAQ entry was specifically opposed to well established consensus. – Servy Nov 9 at 15:01
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    @WBT where did I say I claimed community consensus? You're twisting (or reimagining) what I said...Again, you seem to say the fact it was in an FAQ means it was a rule, or that it indicated community consensus. it didn't, as all the discussions Servy shared with you (and I truly don't feel like rehashing those, again) – Patrice Nov 9 at 15:01
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    @WBT You can't just say, "Every single discussion only talked about the tag and none of them discussed disclosure in the question," when those discussions did in fact discuss disclosure in the question, and said that it's noise. Your claim is simply not true. Mentioning that there shouldn't be a tag as well doesn't change that. – Servy Nov 9 at 15:02
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    I don't think it's worthwhile to continue this discussion, guys; it's clear there's not going to be any agreement. Might be best to just let it lie and lets the votes do their thing. – fbueckert Nov 9 at 15:07
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    @WBT You weren't suggesting new things to the FAQ by rolling back the removal of the statement that homework should be disclosed as such. You were suggesting new things with your other edits to the FAQ to add in new guidelines. Your rollback of a useful change to the FAQ to keep it in line with well established community consensus was wrong, but not the portion of your edits that was suggesting new things to the FAQ. – Servy Nov 9 at 15:08
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    @WBT There's one link that itself links to numerous other duplicate discussions on the topic, and you can search for dozens more that have happened over the years. You can trivially find them. I believe in your ability to search for the word "homework". You're skilled enough to do it if the five discussions linked to you aren't enough. The fact that the FAQ was wrong for several years doesn't mean no one is allowed to change it. AS you've been told, the FAQs are often not as up to date as they should be. That's not an argument for refusing to update them. – Servy Nov 9 at 15:11
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    People, get a chatroom. – yivi Nov 9 at 15:11
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    @WBT No, you were not specifically told that. And now that the comments are public again, everyone can see that you were lying by claiming that you were told no meta post should ever duplicate content found elsewhere. You were told that the content you added wrong, and you were also told that it was off topic in this post. I'll quite Tiny's relevant comment below, but it very clearly states that what you added was off topic. It said we shouldn't duplicate everything on meta in one post; it doesn't say no post should ever duplicate anything found elsewhere. – Servy Nov 9 at 15:15
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    GUYS, yivi's likely getting massive pings from this and indicated they'd prefer not to.... do you mind moving this to the chat, or at least the Q, so Yivi's inbox isn't flooded.... – Patrice Nov 9 at 15:22

We've been over this already.

Every question on the site needs to be on-topic. The only details that need to be included in the question are the details needed to define constraints on how the problem can be solved. Labeling a question as "homework" only makes it easier for those who already have a dislike for homework questions to simply downvote and move on with their lives in spite of the fact that the question may be otherwise acceptable on the site.


I did jump in and remove the language about the question needing to be homework. Why?

Because it's noise!

It doesn't help you solve the problem. It doesn't help you define the problem. If the issue is that you don't necessarily like the question then we need to have a separate discussion about what questions we do and don't like here at Stack Overflow.

For the love of God, someone please remove the language about this already. That part of the edit wasn't even contested...

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    It was contested...the removal of the content was reverted three times by the person who originally wrote that content. – WBT Nov 8 at 16:51
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    @WBT Again, who wrote it, in a community wiki, is irrelevant. – fbueckert Nov 8 at 16:55
  • @WBT: Unless my search-fu is weaker than normal today, the only time it was contested was by you, in a rollback that should have never been done... – Makoto Nov 8 at 16:56
  • @Makoto The history of revisions to this point in the FAQ post is documented above. Fbueckert: Clearly, someone cares about the identity of who's editing. – WBT Nov 8 at 16:58
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    @Makoto One of the rollbacks that added that statement back in was WBT, 4 were Joel Coehoorn, one was Yvette. – Servy Nov 8 at 17:00
  • @Servy: I was looking at revisions 17+. – Makoto Nov 8 at 17:02
  • @Servy and I only restored it because I perceived a lack of on-point discussion supporting removal of a point that had stood for years. My action on that point was motivated by process, with the same principle as ayhan's r24. Once this discussion settles down, I would support whichever action is consistent with the consensus reached here. – WBT Nov 8 at 17:21
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    On MathStackExchange I consider recommandable that homework questions be presented as such it is a straightforward helps to prevent entry-level questions to be solved with advanced techniques (i.e. a valid but unhelpful answer) and also helps making the answers useful for the original poster. On StackOverflow this seems to be a lesser problem, but I wouldn't like to see people trying to disguise questions that in the end are homework as if they weren't nor should valid questions be discouraged or hostilized. – Mefitico Nov 8 at 17:31
  • Your claim (if I understood it properly) is that a homework tag would raise rejection, but there are moderation tools (such as flagging comments) to keep this problem in check. And regarding dislikes I think they're pretty much fair game. – Mefitico Nov 8 at 17:31
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    @Mefitico: At a fundamental level, what's the difference between a homework problem and a practical problem? Remember that not only is the world of math not the same as software engineering, so too is Math Overflow not the same as Stack Overflow. – Makoto Nov 8 at 17:54
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    Makoto: With a practical problem, frame challenges (e.g. 'use a while loop instead of a for'; 'use the language's built-in sort() instead of implementing your own') are more helpful answers than they are on homework problems with their artificial constraints. @Mefitico doesn't seem to be claiming SO and MO are equivalent, and the comment explicitly distinguishes between the sites, but also provides the background information and reasoning for whatever it may be worth in this discussion here. – WBT Nov 8 at 18:00
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    In general, when programming professionally I need to achieve something which I can specify clearly once I reach "question level", and if if find a solution that works, I can often apply it without understanding it (though I'll usually take my time to understand the issue later). If I'm doing homework, then the understanding is the main goal and maybe a snippet of working code does not teach me what I need to know, the answer would benefit from more explanation and some guesswork on what are the shortcomings on my comprehension of the topic (my question itself may should be put into question). – Mefitico Nov 8 at 18:06
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    Also, I was a preparatory course teaching assistant in the past (for math, physics, chemistry). Though "the answer" to the same question would always be the same, I would widely change my answer method and steps based on the student (do I know he comprehends the topic but missed a detail? Do I believe he actually needs a lecture on the topic before the question is approached? Does he know well the pre-requisites for a given topic?). Though indeed I was never a programming teacher. – Mefitico Nov 8 at 18:10

If the question is using material from someone other than the poster, it needs to properly reference it. This is just the regular plagiarism policy.

If the question has unusual constraints (e.g. "must use a for loop"), the reason why should be mentioned. If you don't mention this from the start, you'll probably be asked about it, since it's a key piece of information in deciding if a "frame challenge" answer (e.g. "use this while loop instead") would be acceptable.

I can't think of any other situation where you'd need to disclose the fact you're asking about homework (at least on Stack Overflow). In the end, it's just evaluated on whether it's a good question or a bad one and I think we'd all rather someone focus on the steps to making the question good.

Disclosing that a question is homework helps potential answerers or commenters understand artificial constraints that the question presents, e.g. not being able to use a language's built-in sort() function. Therefore, in questions with these sorts of artificial constraints, it can be helpful to explain the reasoning behind them.

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    "understand artificial constraints that the question presents, e.g. not being able to use a language's built-in sort() " I would advise to just mention those constraints explicitly, possibly even including that it's, as already mentioned, an artificially unavoidable constraint. But hey, this still is not exactly, what was in that particular guideline: admit that it's homework suggests that one should always make it clear to everyone else that it is homework, even when that information is irrelevant. – E_net4 is kind and welcoming Nov 8 at 16:24
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    Unless something is physically impossible in software, every constraint that exists is artificial. You'd be surprised how often real-world problems get mistaken for homework problems. – Makoto Nov 8 at 16:24
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    @WBT So why not let people come to their own decisions, instead of saying "People will probably say this, so let me remind them that there are other options."? Does that not seem like something someone with a particular bias would do? – Ethan Field Nov 8 at 16:46
  • @EthanField The well-studied phenomena of groupthink leads people to overlook other options once they have found one that seems to have merit. Balanced discussions often require someone stepping into the role of pointing out other options even if they are not personally convinced that those alternatives are the best option. – WBT Nov 8 at 16:50
  • @EthanField Also, I didn't guess at which point "people will probably say" first. I waited and when I saw only one side presented and starting to gain upvotes, I put in the other so they could both be considered. As stated above, had this point been posted and started to gather votes first, I would have posted an answer like one of the others ("Every question on the site needs to be on-topic. The only details that need to be included in the question are the details needed to define constraints on how the problem can be solved. Unless it's relevant to defining the question, it's noise.") – WBT Nov 8 at 16:57
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    @Ethan Field: Re-stating here an opinion others have made elsewhere does not equate to holding a personal stake in it. You can disagree with an opinion but respect it enough to consider it relevant to the conversation. It probably befits this answer to be a community wiki to drive home the point that WBT themself doesn't subscribe to the stated opinion. – BoltClock Nov 8 at 17:44

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