I just wrote a question on Stack Overflow.

Now I was thinking if it would be a good idea to include the full stacktrace to the error or just the error message.

From my point of view, the stacktrace would not add much more helpful information and it was about 30 lines long, so I choose not to post it.

It would be great to have an expandable code block where I can just write something like this

<code expand="auto" lines="3">
    code line 1
    code line 2
    code line 3
    code line 5
    ...
    code line 100
</code>

this would be shown as

code line 1
code line 2
code line 3

expand

and if I click expand the full code would be shown.

expand could be either true, false or auto where auto would expand the code on desktop and hide it on mobile.

  • 12
  • 45
    I can't be the only one who tries clicking on the expand link... – Ferrybig Nov 9 at 9:04
  • 3
    Good idea; don't hold your breath. Snippets have been un-resourced for years, and this would fall into the same area. – T.J. Crowder Nov 9 at 9:15
  • 3
    Until/unless it happens, FWIW, I would include the stack trace, I'd just tuck it away at the very bottom of the question and then refer to it from the body of the question, e.g., "I get the error FooBar (full stack trace at the end of the question)." – T.J. Crowder Nov 9 at 9:16
  • 1
    @Ferrybig I did. I saw it and my instincts fired. I think that perhaps I am not really a thinking agent after all. Instead I just dumbly execute behaviours in response to stimuli, like a woodlouse fleeing from the light. – Mark Amery Nov 9 at 13:55
  • And there could be an option in account preference settings to show the code automatically. – Black Thunder Nov 9 at 17:46
  • I absolutely agree, this could be useful in many situation such as the creation of data frame for reproducible examples or multiple steps for a task. – paoloeusebi Nov 10 at 4:57

While this could be a useful feature, you can, currently, do something like:

I get the following error:

Error line 1
Error line 2
Error line 3

For the full stacktrace, please see the following collapsed snippet:

 
Stacktrace Line 1
Stacktrace Line 2
Stacktrace Line 3
Stacktrace Line 4
Stacktrace Line 5
Stacktrace Line 6
Stacktrace Line 7
Stacktrace Line 8
Stacktrace Line 9
Stacktrace Line 10
Stacktrace Line 11
Stacktrace Line 12
Stacktrace Line 13
Stacktrace Line 14
Stacktrace Line 15
Stacktrace Line 16
Stacktrace Line 17
Stacktrace Line 18
Stacktrace Line 19
Stacktrace Line 20
Stacktrace Line 21
Stacktrace Line 22
Stacktrace Line 23
Stacktrace Line 24
Stacktrace Line 25
Stacktrace Line 26
Stacktrace Line 27
Stacktrace Line 28
Stacktrace Line 29
Stacktrace Line 30
Stacktrace Line 31
Stacktrace Line 32
Stacktrace Line 33
Stacktrace Line 34
Stacktrace Line 35
Stacktrace Line 36
Stacktrace Line 37
Stacktrace Line 38
Stacktrace Line 39
Stacktrace Line 40
 
 
 

The above has the disadvantage of using JavaScript, HTML, or CSS code highlighting, but accomplishes your desire of hiding the larger block of your stacktrace text.

Hiding a stack snippet

Stack Snippets have a hide: option. If you set it to hide: true then the stack snippet will be hidden:

<!-- begin snippet: js hide: true console: true babel: false -->

In the snippet editor, there's a "Hide snippet by default" option:

enter image description here

  • 7
    OK, how did you do that? – Flydog57 Nov 9 at 17:55
  • @Flydog57 Click the edit button to see the "source" of the post. – Kevin Workman Nov 9 at 18:26
  • 2
    @fly: At 2000 reputation you get the Edit Questions And Answers privilege. Either you bookmark this post and come back when you are there, or you ask someone to spoil it for you. – IInspectable Nov 9 at 18:27
  • That's a really good trick! Maybe someone could edit this question so that lower rep people can see the answer (I have no IDEA how to get that quoting right!). It's a bit verbose and hard to remember if you aren't a javascript coder, people will have to refer back to this answer for all eternity. – Bill K Nov 9 at 19:07
  • @Flydog57 Thanks for pointing out that I should have explained how to do it. I should have included that originally. I've updated the answer to show how. Another time, if you want to see the source text for a post, you can go to the post's edit history (linked in the post at the bottom middle, the "edited X time ago"). On the revision history each version has a link to the "source", which will display the Markdown source for the version. – Makyen Nov 9 at 23:16
  • @BillK For this post, I misused the quoteblock to indicate the portion of the answer showing what the person's post could look like. I wasn't intending to indicate they should put the text in their own post in a quoteblock (just covering a possible interpretation). This time, the quoteblock format was relatively easy. I just wrote everything out; selected it all and clicked on the " icon above the editor. As it turns out, I shouldn't have selected the entire snippet, as it added > to each code line, so I had to delete those. – Makyen Nov 9 at 23:27
  • Thanks so much. I only started contributing to SO in mid-summer and have only accumulated a little more than about a milli-Skeet of reputation. I can edit on SO, but apparently not on Meta. Something to look forward to, I guess. Thanks again! – Flydog57 Nov 9 at 23:30

Large code blocks are already shown smaller than they are.

This could be modified slightly and leveraged to solve the problem of "unimportant code block is too large" without asking for a brand new feature.

As an example:

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
20
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
40
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
50
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
60
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
70
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
80
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
90
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
100

once it passes 40ish lines, it becomes a scrollable block.

Having the option of a smaller window would probably solve your problem almost as well (say, 10 lines).

  • 2
    The concept of a scrollable viewport is problematic in web pages, because you will inevitably run into scenarios, where scrollable content is nested within other scrollable content. This is particularly troublesome on small form factors, like mobile phones, and easily turns into a real UX issue, when the device only provides touch input. – IInspectable Nov 9 at 18:35

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .