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The community members either ask or answer different questions a day. This is how they share their knowledge and help each other improve their programming skills.

Reading the answers given to nice questions let the developers learn better techniques, but it would be more beneficial if the answers could be summarized in the shape of a comprehensive programming book/reference.

In this way, the developers could find the best and most recent answer(s) to their questions easier (instead of searching and reading many different threads).

(By the way, there are many old threads with accepted answers which are no longer helpful; in some cases, they could be even misleading).

UPDATE:

I believe Stack Overflow has become a primary part of every developer's toolkit. The community has numerous members, ranging from beginners to experts including famous authors of priceless programming books. Considering the great potential of this community, I wonder why this site should not provide the best source for learning computer programming for diverse developers with different levels of proficiency.

I used the term 'Books' for such a source; something similar to a digital encyclopedia. By definition, an encyclopedia is a book or set of books giving information on many subjects or on many aspects of one subject. Wikipedia (which is not a book, of course) would be a good model for such an encyclopedia.

Having said that, there is an important difference between Wikipedia and this idea. Wikipedia explains/introduces many topics but does not train the reader. For example, you get to know what C# is but you cannot learn it just by reading Wikipedia. The reader does need to see different examples. On the other hand, this idea is not to implement an example-based learning source such as codeproject. Rather, it suggests a well-organized set of topics supported by insightful examples and many programming tips. The threads on the site would be proper sources for enriching the 'books'. Also, each topic in a book can be linked to relevant threads on the site.

closed as unclear what you're asking by Robert Columbia, il_raffa, Nissa, Code Lღver, Arun Vinoth Nov 6 '18 at 18:41

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    I doubt that a book would be “easier” than searching on the internet or could contain the “most recent answer(s)”. – Sebastian Simon Nov 6 '18 at 7:35
  • ... How would you organize such a book? StackOverflow contains Q&A related a myrid topics in programming – Suraj Rao Nov 6 '18 at 7:37
  • @Xufox—this idea doesn't have any contradiction with searching the web. You may find your answer directly in the book. When someone gives an answer to a question, they could add it to the book or update an existing answer. – Mimi Nov 6 '18 at 7:43
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    'answers given to nice questions let the developers learn better techniques'.... well, unfortunately, there are differneces of opinion over which techniques are 'better'. The outcome of such an attempted 'comprehensive programming book/reference' would likely be somewhere between 'pistols at dawn' and full-scale war. Just 'tabs/spaces' could send it nuclear. – Martin James Nov 6 '18 at 7:43
  • @SurajRao—How wikipedia is organized? – Mimi Nov 6 '18 at 7:44
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    @Mimi Wikipedia isn’t a book. – Sebastian Simon Nov 6 '18 at 7:46
  • @Xufox—I didn't say Wikipedia is a book. I just said such a book/reference could be organized in a similar way. – Mimi Nov 6 '18 at 7:51
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    @MartinJames—It is Okay to put different opinions about the same topic in one place. The reader would decide which way to go. – Mimi Nov 6 '18 at 7:54
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    Sounds like documentation – rene Nov 6 '18 at 8:03
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    'but it would be more beneficial if the answers could be summarized in the shape of a comprehensive programming book/reference.' - I'm curious how a book would be more beneficial and as far as references go, most - if not all - people would use official documentation that you can find online or use SO as a reference. The would most absolutely slow people down as opposed to just typing something into Google and getting your answer almost instantly. – Script47 Nov 6 '18 at 9:15
  • @Script47—Let's say you want to learn about a certain topic. You may read a book chapter. That's a good idea but it isn't practical to cover all tips and tricks in a normal book mainly because of two reasons: 1- Such a book would be too thick. 2- The author may not know which corners have still remained dark to the reader. My idea is to integrate the threads into a comprehensive book/reference by reshaping Q&As into programming tips under certain categories. Necessary links to the related threads can also be provided... – Mimi Nov 6 '18 at 12:07
  • ...At least, the reader would see the most popular tips about that certain topic in one place and would know that the book contains the most recent tips (strategies/techniques/...). Also, it can be more reliable as the reader would know that the book is certified by many developers. This is what may not be the case for many threads marked as answered. – Mimi Nov 6 '18 at 12:10
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    I believe a book, either digital or printed, is going to be out of date the second it is published. Things are far too dynamic for any type of printed material when it comes to the subjects that SO covers. – Dave Nov 6 '18 at 12:14
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    But that is what the search within the site and Google are there for. I'm just not seeing how what you propose would help. – Dave Nov 6 '18 at 12:23
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    @Mimi could you please clarify how your proposal is different from "documentation" attempt? – Alexei Levenkov Nov 6 '18 at 17:30
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I think you'll find it unlikely that SO Inc. will want to do this. A big part of why this site was created was because they believed so strongly in the value of search engines being an important part of how the site would function, finding the right information for problems, and focusing on the "long tail" of questions, and leaving the books to handle the introductory topics that are more suited to that format.

Of course, given the license on all of the user contributed content, you're free to re-work any of that content into your own book that you publish, as long as you cite all of the content you use appropriately and apply the license to your own work (and good luck finding a publisher willing to publish a book under that license; I expect they're not going to be so fond of publishing a book under such a permissive license as it will make it hard for them to get paid, meaning you'll need to foot a pretty big bill yourself to get them to agree).

  • Thank you for your comments. I updated my proposal to clarify what I mean by writing books. – Mimi Nov 7 '18 at 4:55

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