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Recently, I have created a new tag called and I used the tag on a recent related question. Trying to be a good citizen of this community, I also wanted to add an initial tag wiki for the tag that I have created. So I've proposed the following wiki:

Persistent memory is a type of byte-addressable non-volatile memory that is physically present on the main memory bus and can be accessed using regular load and store instructions. It's also called storage-class memory (SCM) and NVRAM. This is in contrast to the volatile DRAM.

As you can see, I've defined what the tag means so that people can use it on related questions. Since I don't have enough reputation to make wiki edits directly, the edit has to be reviewed by others to be accepted. Then some time later, much to my surprise, the wiki edit I made got rejected by two reviewers for the following reason:

Simply defining what a [tag] is rarely helps those using it unless the tag's name itself is ambiguous. Excerpts should describe why and when a tag should be used. See the help center for more guidance.

I find this just frustrating for the following reasons:

  • "Persistent memory" is not common knowledge. So following the guidelines (specifically, the 5th one), a bit of explanation needs to be added, which exactly what I did. Also I have given a specific definition (following the 2ed guideline).
  • The term "Persistent memory" is actually a bit ambiguous as this Wikipedia article says (and I agree with it). I'm using the term the way many other researchers are using it, but others might use it differently. Am I supposed to also tell the reviewers in the tag wiki itself why I've edited it in this way? And then later I should edit it again to remove that part of the edit?
  • There are many, many existing tag wikis that do define what the tag means. So I'm not doing something strange or out of this world that no one has done before.
  • Then there is this part "Excerpts should describe why and when a tag should be used." but isn't it obvious? A question should use this tag when the question is about this tag. This is just obvious. Isn't it? Like there is nothing to say other than defining what persistent memory is. What are the reviewers expecting from me to write in the wiki?

All I want is just to add a tag wiki for this tag that I have created.

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    While this comment doesn't address your question here, I contend that the tag as you've defined it would be inappropriate for that question anyway. The question has nothing to do with non-volatile memory, save for the fact that the unwanted data is being retrieved from the cache, which just so happens to be implemented using NV memory. The NV attribute has nothing to do with the behaviour observed, which is a function of the cache system as a whole. – enhzflep Nov 6 '18 at 0:17
  • @enhzflep No. The OP of that question clarified in the comments under the question that the question is in fact about persistent memory and the stale data comes from persistent memory itself. Also the cache is just normal SRAM, not NV. – Hadi Brais Nov 6 '18 at 0:22
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    There are many, many existing tag wikis that do define what the tag means. There are a lot of tag excerpts that don't contain any usage guidelines but they're supposed to. However, I'm not surprised anyone wouldn't know this based on how many on the site are done wrong. – BSMP Nov 6 '18 at 22:58
  • @BSMP First, according to this Q/A, it seems to be arguable whether a tag excerpt that "describes implicitly when and why to use it" should be accepted or rejected. Second, I've already said in the first two points that the official guidelines say that it's OK to include a definition when the tag is not common knowledge and/or there is potential ambiguity. So it shouldn't be difficult for me to add an initial tag excerpt for my new tag even if it's just a definition... – Hadi Brais Nov 7 '18 at 0:25
  • ...Any damage that this might cause would be immeasurable if not zero. I don't find any reason why the reviewers who rejected my except had to be so strict about it. – Hadi Brais Nov 7 '18 at 0:25
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    My comment was about your 3rd point specifically. It wasn't an argument against your entire post. But for what it's worth, no one, not even the reject reason you got, said that you can't include a definition in the tag usage guidelines. It said simply defining a tag rarely helps. It's asking you to do more than just define it, it's not telling you that you can't include it at all. – BSMP Nov 7 '18 at 6:58
  • i dont like that tag. – Daniel A. White Nov 8 '18 at 14:21
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    Honestly, SO seems like a constitutional republic with a ton of rules sometimes. – mackycheese21 Nov 8 '18 at 15:49
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I'm not going to address all your frustration bullets but I suggest you check if you can give this excerpt your approval:

Use this tag for questions related to accessing persistent (non-volatile) memory (also known as SCM or NVRAM) with regular load and store instructions. Do not use this tag for hardware related and/or end-user issues; those might fit on Super User.

Let me know if you want to suggest the above yourself or if you want me to edit it in. I have full tag-wiki privileges, my edits don't have to be reviewed.

  • I suggest the following excerpt: "Use this tag for questions related to programming for persistent memory (also known as SCM or NVRAM), which is a type of byte-addressable non-volatile memory that is physically present on the main memory bus and can be accessed using regular load and store instructions. Do not use this tag for hardware related and/or end-user issues, those might fit on Super User." You can make the edit directly. Thanks. – Hadi Brais Nov 6 '18 at 15:04
  • I'm new here on meta. Should I accept your answer or you think I should leave the question open? – Hadi Brais Nov 6 '18 at 15:04
  • @HadiBrais acceptance is something for you to decide. I added your proposed text as wiki excerpt. You can write your own answer and accept it or accept mine. It is up to you. – rene Nov 6 '18 at 15:30
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I reviewed and rejected this edit, for the reason you quote. Here I'll explain why I chose to reject.

Consider the proposed text

Persistent memory is a type of byte-addressable non-volatile memory that is physically present on the main memory bus and can be accessed using regular load and store instructions. It's also called storage-class memory (SCM) and NVRAM. This is in contrast to the volatile DRAM.

This comes up with a definition of "persistent memory", but it doesn't address which questions on Stack Overflow should have this tag. It also doesn't address whether a potential question about persistent memory belongs on Stack Overflow at all. Consider the third guideline in the list you reference:

Concentrate on what a tag means to your community.

Do you want a question to be tagged with this because:

  • it uses this type of memory?
  • it uses this type of memory and there's a problem with a load/store instruction?
  • the Java runtime crashed with an error message about NVRAM?
  • you tried to solder an NVRAM chip on to your phone and now you can't call your vet?
  • you are writing a compiler and you want to know when you should target this part of memory?

rene's tag text does capture at least some of this.

Regarding removing ambiguity, in your link to the Wikipedia article, the only part referencing potential confusion I see is:

Often confused with non-volatile random-access memory (NVRAM), persistent memory ...

but your proposed text explicitly says

It's also called storage-class memory (SCM) and NVRAM.

  • Thanks for explaining why you decided to reject the edit. I will first respond to the second half of your answer. The distinction made in the Wikipedia article is not really followed by many researchers. Intel for example uses the term persistent memory to refer to what the Wikipedia article calls NVRAM. So these two terms have practically become synonyms, although some people might make a distinction between them. So it is important to clearly define what I meant by "persistent memory" when I created the tag... – Hadi Brais Nov 6 '18 at 23:57
  • ...Defining the two terms as synonyms ensures that everyone understands what the tag is about no matter which definition that person is using. So the ambiguity is real and my proposed tag wiki clarifies it. Regarding the first half of your answer. It's unreasonable to expect from me to think of the ways in which the very new tag might be misused. It's not like the wiki I'm proposing will be carved in stone! We can make further edits in the future to improve it when necessary... – Hadi Brais Nov 6 '18 at 23:57
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    ...Persistent memory is a new thing and there are currently very few questions that can be tagged as such. In the future when more questions are posted, we can refine the wiki accordingly. It's just an initial wiki for a brand new tag! I think it's unnecessary to be so strict about it. For now, it's good enough to say "if the question is about persistent memory then use the tag." It's good to leave some room for how might this tag be used. Future questions can then help us determine exactly how the tag should be used. You are also exaggerating with your list of five points... – Hadi Brais Nov 6 '18 at 23:57
  • ...This is a programming forum, so obviously the fourth point is not related to the tag. The other 4 are actually fine at this time (maybe not in the future, who knows). I feel this is obvious. Note that in general, I get your point, but it does not apply in this particular case! Again, I appreciate your response. – Hadi Brais Nov 6 '18 at 23:57
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    If you think that rene's version is better, then you could have just accepted my edit and then edit it yourself so that it looks like rene's version. I expect from you, as a reviewer, to help me improve my contributions to this forum (and to encourage me to continue doing so), not suppress my contributions! – Hadi Brais Nov 7 '18 at 0:03
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    @HadiBrais only users with 20000 reputation can directly make tag edits. francescalus having less than 20k reputation at the time of the review, it's no wonder that he had to be strict: he couldn't accept an incorrect excerpt because he did not had the ability to fix it without a certain delay. – Cœur Nov 7 '18 at 5:32
  • @Cœur I also don't have 20K rep. So just like me, francescalus can still make an edit and that edit will have to be reviewed just like my edit. And then those other reviewers can make their own edits. And that's OK. We are all users here. – Hadi Brais Nov 7 '18 at 5:50
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    The review tools I have are very blunt: reject or accept (and just as one voice of two or three) or skip. I feel the reject reason I chose adequately explained my thinking at the time so it was appropriate to use that rather than the free-form text. If you want clarification after then you did the correct thing of raising the issue on Meta. You also, in collaboration with another user, got an improved excerpt created. It seems review worked! – francescalus Nov 7 '18 at 7:51
  • I've accepted rene's answer, but thanks for the answer too. – Hadi Brais Nov 7 '18 at 22:33

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