70

While in suggested edit review, I stumbled upon 2-3 questions that were edited only with the additional tag (for ApiOmat).

It seems the tag was created today by a user that appears to be the CTO of ApiOmat.

In the cases I've encountered, the problem was related to another issue entirely, and in no way caused by ApiOmat. The OP of the questions only mentioned the name in the question body.

What should be done in this case? I've voted to reject the edits, but I don't know if further actions are required to prevent the user from serial tagging again.

  • 2
    Well, regarding the edits: if the new tag is essential to the question to narrow the context, then it can be useful, but if it just mentioned in the question but not important for the actual question, then reject the edit. – Tom Oct 30 '18 at 12:08
  • 2
    @Tom yeah, that's what I've done so far. On the 3 questions I've reviewed, none of those required the additional tag to make sense, so I rejected. I was wondering if some other steps could/should be taken to prevent the user to continue the serial tagging – Aserre Oct 30 '18 at 12:10
  • 5
    Nothing in that question says anything about applying the tag to existing posts. The askers are not necessarily around and aware that there is a new tag. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:10
  • 7
    If there is a clear need for the tag (e.g. the tag is clearly defined there is a reasonable number of posts about the tag subject), then applying a new tag to existing posts where that tag is applicable is perfectly fine. I've not looked into this specific tag, but there is no reason to reject tag edits just because it was done by someone other than the question asker. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:13
  • 1
    @MartijnPieters well, it looks I linked the wrong meta discussion. I'll edit in a few moments. Regarding the second part of your comment, I agree that it could be the case, but here, the user tagged very old / already answered questions which problem was not caused by apiomat (I could link to the suggested edits if that would help for clarity) – Aserre Oct 30 '18 at 12:13
  • 3
    @Aserre: we see tags being used on questions where the problem wasn't caused by that specific subject all the time, and it's not a very good criteria. Not every question asker knows what the exact cause of a problem is, after all. Was there suspicion that the tool was the cause? It's perfectly possible that the tag indeed should not be added to a post, but it's not as black and white as all that. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:15
  • 2
    @Aserre: and if there is a post here on Meta that claims that a newly minted appropriate tag can't be added to existing posts by other authors, I'd be happy to counter that argument in that location. That absolutely goes against policy and common sense. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:16
  • 1
    @MartijnPieters "Not every question asker knows what the exact cause of a problem is, after all. Was there suspicion that the tool was the cause?" ... this is true then the asker adds the tag without knowing if it is suitable or not, but here we're talking about existing question which (may) have answers, thus the issue and the fix are known. It is easier to determine if the tag is suitable there or not. – Tom Oct 30 '18 at 12:17
  • 5
    @Tom: would a user of the tool find that question useful and would want to find it? If people with the same question can reasonably think the tool is involved and a possible cause, then the tag can be appropriate. Again, use your best judgement but just because the answer is known doesn't necessarily invalidate the tag. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:19
  • 1
    @Aserre: that post discusses the usefulness of the tag. The issue here is with the tag itself, not the adding of the tag to older posts. I've removed your reference altogether, as you are misreading the policy. It's very simple: if the tag is not applicable or the tag shouldn't be created to begin with, then no, don't add the tag. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:21
  • 1
    @MartijnPieters I've had a look at the edit suggestions. In this particular case, rejection was appropriate. In general, of course, we should judge each edit on its own merits. – S.L. Barth Oct 30 '18 at 12:21
  • 4
    @S.L.Barth: thanks. I'm absolutely discussing the general case here, and the claims made about general policy that really don't apply. If the tag edit is inappropriate for the post or the tag is not appropriate, then please, do decline the edits! Those are valid reasons to decline a tag being added. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:22
  • A shoutout from the original bulk tagger :D meta.stackexchange.com/questions/25154/… – luvieere Nov 1 '18 at 14:54
46

The tag fails our tag creation guidelines; there is no clear need for the tag. Rejection is the right action here, as irrelevant tag.

I've rejected the remaining open suggested edit reviews and will reach out to the user.

Note that there is no reason to reject valid tag edits, even if the tag is new and the post is old. If a new tag applies to a post, then that's a reasonable edit to make to that post, no other criteria need apply. Users with < 2k reputation can only add tags with suggested edits, which are rate limited per user specifically to limit tag-editing campaigns, so don't worry about a mass retagging getting out of hand in such cases.

  • 3
    Does having enough edits rejected for that reason eventually result in the diamonds being notified of the user's behavior? Or should someone custom-flag if they notice? – EJoshuaS Oct 30 '18 at 12:41
  • 4
    @EJoshuaS: see Do spam/vandalism suggested edit rejections raise mod flags automatically?; flagging a post for moderator attention would be appreciated in such cases. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 12:45
  • 3
    @MartijnPieters Eh; I think your "charitable" interpretation is in fact uncharitable. The most charitable interpretation is that the user thought that a post simply mentioning the topic of a tag was sufficient reason for the tag to be applied, regardless of whether it's really the topic of the post. I see that reasoning get applied by all sorts of users all the time with other tags, for totally non-nefarious reasons; we don't have to assume sketchy intentions or even that the user was trying to promote their product at all to explain their behaviour, here. – Mark Amery Oct 30 '18 at 13:13
  • 4
    @MarkAmery: ick, actually, I'm not sure what I did to miss the mentions. There was a mention in an answer in one place, in a code snippet elsewhere, so I missed the mentions. I can see now how the user found those posts, all of them did have a (tenuous) relationship to the platform, so yes, I made a judgement error there. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 13:20
  • @MartijnPieters I don't know how to find the posts that were tagged now, but was just going by the characterisation of events in the Meta question. FWIW, at a glance it also looks to me like some questions like stackoverflow.com/q/12216867/1709587 and stackoverflow.com/q/12209980/1709587 legitimately should be tagged with apiomat, since they're genuinely about the product (not that I know anything about it). – Mark Amery Oct 30 '18 at 13:23
  • 1
    @MarkAmery: if there is enough need for a specific tag, then I'd prefer it if the community created the tag, organically. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 13:27
  • 2
    @MartijnPieters This is perhaps a topic worthy of its own Meta question, but I don't agree with that; I see no problem at all with the owners of a programming-related tool being the ones to create a tag for it, so long as there are existing questions about it and they don't go around attaching the tag to questions where it doesn't belong. – Mark Amery Oct 30 '18 at 13:32
  • 1
    @MarkAmery: This is not just a single programmer though, this is a commercial venture. The advice in How can I use Stack Overflow to support our developer community? applies here. – Martijn Pieters Oct 30 '18 at 13:33
  • 5
    @MartijnPieters Noted, but it doesn't change my take. I don't think anything in the Meta post you link to implies that commercial ventures shouldn't unilaterally create a tag about their product. There's an exhortation not to seed Stack Overflow with content, but I don't think I'd characterise tag creation as falling under that umbrella; they're not seeding us with content, but rather just categorising content that's already been created here ("organically", as you and Robert both put it). – Mark Amery Oct 30 '18 at 13:39
9

There are a few options.

Ideally, you can discuss it with the user. This is always a bit risky. Most users are open to criticism, but you always have a few that get belligerent. If you decide to talk with the user, assume best intentions. Honey catches more flies than vinegar does.

You can also flag it for moderator attention, if you think the user is trying to spamvertize their product. I've had a quick look at Apiomat and it looks like a normal organization, not one that would try to spam.

Note that a user can only have 5 pending edits at a time. This rate-limit has explicitly been created to prevent mass-editing. So, the situation is already somewhat under control. <Swallows horror stories of mass edits we had before that time>.

And finally, if enough of the user's edits get rejected, they will get an edit ban.

As a side note, the only reason to reject a tag edit is if the tag is inappropriate. It doesn't matter how old the question is, or who created the tag, because that is not relevant to the users who find the question. The only question for a tag edit is, "is the tag appropriate for the question?"

  • Users should not discuss/police serious moderation issues with other users, and there is no forum for doing such on the main site. I guess they could poke the other user in a comment and point them to the on-going meta discussion... But the correct way to handle this is to flag for moderator attention, period. – Lundin Nov 1 '18 at 7:27

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .