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This question already has an answer here:

I have a question about my Stack Overflow post What would you call source control management software that makes full versions of changes.

I am out of my element here I think; I am not sure exactly.

This community has rules for questions; I get it. But a 5 day question ban because I had the word recommendation in my post? I am really just looking for a term. Here is the best I can do: Say I check out a file, modify it and then check back in. Most of these programs would make a new version of the file and a delta file logging the changes. What I think they want is a source control management software that will create a new file version when an item is checked out, modified, and checked back in so that instead of just having a delta, you have two versions of the file. If this is confusing it could very well be my own lack of understanding about this.


Original post in question:

What Source Control Management softwares will fully backup old versions?

I am looking for a source control management software that will not just make a history of a file that is being changed, but will make full backups of my complete software for each release and version change, even if only one part of it has been modified. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Stephen Rauch, jhpratt, pirho, Nissa Oct 27 '18 at 2:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Also, I think I was getting somewhere with a member who I was discussing with. It's unfortunate the post was deleted and severed my communication with him. – Jonathan M Oct 26 '18 at 20:51
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    You don't get banned because of one bad post, but multiple. – Daedalus Oct 26 '18 at 20:54
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    @Daedalus You can get rate limited for a few days from one bad post though. Not sure if there is only one bad post for this user, but such a thing is in fact possible. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 20:56
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    Let's not talk about rate limits or any of that noise. Let's focus on what it is you're asking. Are you looking for a tool to do this or are you attempting to define a tool that does this? – Makoto Oct 26 '18 at 20:57
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    There was another meta question that asked about your question is probably the reason why it got so much attention. The new version seems to be better, I just cast the last undelete vote. – BDL Oct 26 '18 at 21:07
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    @JonathanM Stackoverflow is a victim of its own popularity. With dozen of questions popping up every minutes (most of them of bad quality by new users), and veterans users who are fed up by that, you have people who are caught in the middle of the fire (e.g. new users who are trying to learn, and some older users who aren't that aggressive). It's difficult at first, but once you get through the stress (and the possible heart attack), it'll be simpler (at least from my point of view). – Clockwork Oct 26 '18 at 21:09
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    @Makoto Wait, so every single time you see a very clearly off topic question you just assume that the author meant to ask a completely different question, and that they just "accidentally" asked the question that they did? The site provides lots of information to new users on what types of questions are acceptable here. That software recommendations aren't appropriate are one of the more clearly indicated points. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 21:15
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    @Servy: I don't make that assumption; that'd be silly. I take action by closing the question and letting the system deal with it after that. If the OP does come back to edit it into shape, then that's fine - the system works as it should've. Deleting it almost as quickly as it was closed tells me that the system is broken and ripe for abuse. – Makoto Oct 26 '18 at 21:17
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    @Makoto Questions should be deleted when they aren't salvageable. That question wasn't, hence deletion is appropriate. Questions that have problems that are fixable can be given time to actually be fixed. Rewriting a question into a completely different question isn't fixing it. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 21:19
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    @Makoto They didn't come to meta for help fixing their question, they came to meta to say that they think it was unfair that their entirely off topic question was received poorly, and then said that they actually meant to ask something radically different than what they actually asked. They didn't ask for help fixing their question. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 21:23
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    Radically different? Slight differences in wording aren't radical. And it is definitely salvagable. Makoto salvaged it pretty well and got to the meat of what I was asking. It seems too many of you are looking for the worst in people and not trying to help newcomers like Makoto did. – Jonathan M Oct 26 '18 at 21:49
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    @JonathanM As I've said, rewriting a question into a completely different question isn't salvaging it. It's just writing a new question. It bares literally no resemblance to the question that you asked and that was deleted. All that's been done is that you subverted the rate limiting on asking questions by editing your new question into an old one, instead of waiting to ask a new one. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 21:52
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    It's asking the same question but instead of asking one thing it's asking something different. Got it. – user3942918 Oct 26 '18 at 22:01
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    Jonathan, I mean he basically paraphrased you. You said yourself "it is asking the same question, but it's asking for A, instead of B".... he's just pointing out (in a curt and a bit snarky way, I will agree to that) that this can be confusing. In general, try to take any comment for what feedback it's trying to give. It'll give you a better Stack experience than being on the backfoot :/ – Patrice Oct 26 '18 at 22:11
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    @Makoto Well, he actually took interest in my question and was trying to help answer it. We were discussing it when the post was deleted. You have been the most helpful, however. Little did I know this would turn into this large of a conversation. You caught on to what nobody else seemed too: I was trying to fix my question and elaborate on what I was looking for. Other people claim that I just completely asked a different question. Which isint the case. I just edited it so that it wasn't confusing for people so it wouldent be interpreted as me asking for a particular reccomendation. – Jonathan M Oct 26 '18 at 23:09
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Wow, yikes. I can see why it was reacted to so negatively to begin with, but I also have a strong concern with how quickly action was taken against it.

Let's start with the first revision.

I am looking for a source control management software that will not just make a history of a file that is being changed, but will make full backups of my complete software for each release and version change, even if only one part of it has been modified. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks.

Immediately, this is off-topic since you're asking us to recommend software to you. A faux-pas by any stretch.

What then happens in the stretch of minutes:

  • The post is closed
  • The post is deleted five minutes later

Obligatory PSA: If closure is meant to give the OP a chance to improve the question, then deletion is overkill. No OP on this planet can revise a question to be better within 5 minutes, and to expect that of users only causes more friction between them and us.

While I don't believe that this was at the level of a deletable question, I'll have to debate that some other day when CMs can dedicate some resources to this.

You then make an edit to try to correct it - which is good!

I am not looking for a recommendation. I am out of my element here I think, I am not sure exactly. Here is the best I can do: Say I check out a file, modify it and then check back in. Most of these programs would make a new version of the file and a delta file logging the changes. What I want is a source control management software that will create a new file version when an item is checked out, modified, and checked back in so that instead of just having a delta, you have two versions of the file. Is there a term for this? If this is confusing it could very well be my own lack of understanding about this.

It's an improvement but it still contains some traces of "recommend this to me", which isn't exactly what you want to post.

No big deal; I've taken a stab at an edit myself to focus specifically on the terminology as opposed to the technology.

Say I check out a file, modify it and then check back in. Most version control systems would make a new version of the file and a delta file logging the changes.

Is there a term for a version control system which creates a new file version when an item is checked out, modified, and checked back in so that instead of just having a delta, you have two versions of the file?

Hopefully this means your question gets a second chance.

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    Yes. If I knew what to research I would be able to find a software on my own time, the question I am trying to convey is how you would describe in technical terms what that would be called. – Jonathan M Oct 26 '18 at 21:08
  • @JonathanM A file version manager? Or file revision manager. – Clockwork Oct 26 '18 at 21:12
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    There was nothing remotely salvageable about the original question, other than to rewrite it into a different question on the same topic. I've no concern with it being deleted so quickly after it was closed. I do have concerns that it stood as it did for 2 hours and triage failed miserably in its review. – user3942918 Oct 26 '18 at 21:12
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    @PaulCrovella: I don't disagree that Triage dropped the ball on this - I do feel like those reviewers should be given a bit of a time-out for that. However, it's not every day you see people come around and try to improve their question on this. I get it; it's easy to dismiss the first version since yeah, that was really bad and I'd have voted to close it too - but I don't see any real reason to have deleted it so quickly, before the OP had a real chance to make an effort to improve it. C'mon, they're at least trying... – Makoto Oct 26 '18 at 21:16
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    Focus on the Big Picture please, this user already got ample warnings that he was heading for a question ban. Hasn't learned anything from it until it was too late. Trying to keep the question alive just puts him in a bigger hole. – Hans Passant Oct 26 '18 at 21:16
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    @Makoto There was no improving that question, there was only writing an entirely different one in its place. – user3942918 Oct 26 '18 at 21:18
  • Yes @PaulCrovella; I've heard your perspective on why you felt that rapid deletion of the post was justified. You've heard my perspective on why it wasn't. I'm content with leaving it at that. – Makoto Oct 26 '18 at 21:20
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    @HansPassant This is their first question. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 21:20
  • @PaulCrovella True. But it seems like the user was question banned on his first question, so he didn't get a chance to reword himself on another question... – Clockwork Oct 26 '18 at 21:21
  • @Clockwork They were not question banned. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 21:21
  • @Servy Really? Weird, I thought I had read that somewhere... My bad. Edit: Yeah, that's what he wrote in the original post. – Clockwork Oct 26 '18 at 21:22
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    Unless I missed the memo, users don't get a ban on their first question. The system has a way to detect a user that creates a new account to bypass earlier question bans. – Hans Passant Oct 26 '18 at 21:25
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    @HansPassant They weren't question banned. Even a single bad question results in more stringent rate limiting than normal, so the rate limit for asking a question went from 90 minutes to a few days, because of their one bad question. They weren't question banned. This increased rate limiting is precisely the warnings you were talking about earlier that people get before an actual question ban, which requires more than just one bad question. – Servy Oct 26 '18 at 21:49
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    @HansPassant this is the first question and there's no appearance that this account was created to bypass a ban. I've noticed other users being banned quickly. I'm not sure if the ban algorithm has been tweaked. – Yvette Colomb Oct 26 '18 at 23:34
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Closed question

In response to a flag the question has been closed again.

enter image description here

From your question:

Is there a term for a version control system which creates a new file version when an item is checked out, modified, and checked back in so that instead of just having a delta, you have two versions of the file?

This reads like a way to circumvent that the question is essentially asking for a version control system recommendation. If it isn't asking for that, then the question is unclear.

Deleted question

As for deletion of the question. I don't delete newly closed posts where there is discussion, as it can help the OP resolve a situation or improve their questions (if not the current question, future questions). If the question has little activity I sometimes delete them, but always leave a comment for the OP, so they have a way to contact someone about it. Otherwise it's like turning off the lights and leaving a newcomer to grope around to find a their way out.

My canned comment when deleting a new post.

Please raise a mod flag to have your question undeleted if you edit it to be on topic. See How do I ask a good question?.

Question ban

To clarify the question ban. Yes you only asked one question and received an automated ban.

Where to ask

Sounds like Software Recommendations may be the site to go for this. Check the help center about what types of questions are on topic.

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    I don't think I'll hide my disappointment on this one. I don't dispute the fact that the first revision was doing this, but since the OP misspoke and elected instead to find out if there was a term for this, I don't see how it couldn't be considered objective and on-topic here. I suppose instead of bothering I'll just leave it at that, then. – Makoto Oct 26 '18 at 23:47
  • @Makoto I'm surprised that you are not seeing this aspect of it. – Yvette Colomb Oct 26 '18 at 23:49
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    Probably because a definition isn't a word choice, but I've said my piece on this. – Makoto Oct 26 '18 at 23:50
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    @Makoto without arguing semantics, it's either a terminology, process or programming tool. – Yvette Colomb Oct 26 '18 at 23:53
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The title of your question in META does not quite tell what you are after. That is why the down votes I guess.

This seems to be your main question so I'll answer to that

This community has rules for questions, I get it. But a 5 day question ban because I had the word recommendation in my post?

That is too rough I agree. For a single bad question.

  • Looking at the amount of the comments in the OP in SO, question in META and the lack of comments in my answer? Please tell what am I missing here, about the "rules"? – pirho Oct 27 '18 at 0:01
  • I didn't downvote, but it reads like a commentary. I think that's why it's been downvoted. – Yvette Colomb Oct 27 '18 at 0:11
  • @YvetteColomb Yes I agree, it is close to a comment but still worth of comments. I now realize that instead of an answer I should have edited the OP title? – pirho Oct 27 '18 at 0:21
  • Perhaps. An edit for clarity is usually a good thing. – Yvette Colomb Oct 27 '18 at 0:36

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