18

I stumbled on an old, too broad Java question yesterday (no effort asking for an algorithm). Having quite some votes, views and answers, I decided to browse through them, and found three answers which were in a different language (Python, C/C++ and Haskell). After conferring with users in the SOCVR we decided to delete those, as the question was explicitly tagged and answers in other languages would thus be technically incorrect.

Today, however, a moderator undeleted one of those answers. Does this mean that it's OK to post an answer in a different language than the one asked for?


PS: I'd rather not link the question due to the meta effect.

marked as duplicate by gnat, Jan Doggen, jhpratt, Stephen Rauch, HaveNoDisplayName Aug 29 at 14:21

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    Strongly related: If the question is specifically about a certain language, is an answer in another language valid? and the dupe target on that one. Not marking as a duplicate because I think a mod undeleting such an answer is a new thing and should be discussed. – Erik A Oct 17 '18 at 7:36
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    If it's asking for a generic algorithm then surely answers in other languages than the tagged one can be useful for future visitors, for whom we build this site? – ivarni Oct 17 '18 at 8:15
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    So, just out of curiosity here, you agreed with other users in chat to coordinate downvoting and then deletion with a set of answers because they were viewed as "technically inaccurate"? The duplicate is correct here, just vote next time. Moderators do not cast binding delete votes based on technical accuracy, and neither should a group of users in chat. – Travis J Oct 17 '18 at 8:38
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    It is a highly specific question about an algorithm, clear as a bell, the OP indicated his language preference. Yet the chatroom decided to close it as too broad. WTF? Either you consider it an algorithm question and the answer is on topic. Or you consider it a [java] question and it isn't too broad. You can't do both. Forcing moderators to disagree with each other is going to blow up sooner or later as well. Consider to limit the collateral damage a bit by not piling on downvotes. 4 users already voted to re-open, done. – Hans Passant Oct 17 '18 at 9:22
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    I would argue that a question tagged with java is expected to have java answers. I didn't see anything in the question that suggested the java tag was wrong or unwarranted. By that fact Haskell and Python answers don't answer the question. As NAA flags will not work / are not meant for these cases I used my delete vote privilege to delete vote the answers. If those answers deemed valuable they can be reposted under a language specific question which offers lasting values for those looking for solution in that specific language. – rene Oct 17 '18 at 12:41
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    @HansPassant the too broad close vote seems applicable here as beyond a problem description there is not much more to go on, aka lacking an attempt. Is your distaste for this closure caused by the fact that when asked these kind of question were kind of okay or is your concern more how interesting the question (and answers) about this algorithm can be? In the latter case can you give us some guidelines/rule of thumbs how we can spot these algorithm questions clear as a bell so we can re-adjust? – rene Oct 17 '18 at 13:05
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    @rene - I have a strong distaste for bored SO users that close a question because they don't understand the relevance or know the proper answer. That is rarely a problem with users that moderate content based on them frequenting a tag, they know the subject. It is a growing problem with the chatroom visitors. Ultimately a discipline problem, I guess, no idea how you'd tackle that. Just make sure the jackass that caused this disaster to never be let back in. – Hans Passant Oct 17 '18 at 13:29
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    In other words, Hans has a beef with a group of users doing their best to shape the site how they consider is best for Stack Overflow, without suggesting anything constructive. – Braiam Oct 17 '18 at 14:24
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    The question was asking for an algorithm? That is language-agnostic. Usually an OP tags it with the language they are working with - whether that's Java, C#, Python, Basic, or what-have-you. From the way you describe it, the question should not have a language tag at all. – S.L. Barth - Reinstate Monica Oct 17 '18 at 14:53
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    @Braiam: In other words, we're talking about a group of users doing their best to bypass consensus and just impose their will despite the fact it runs counter to consensus. The "constructive" suggestion is that they need to take their proposed plan of action to Meta and respect the consensus decision. – Ben Voigt Oct 17 '18 at 15:02
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    @BenVoigt which consensus? What makes their voice less consensus-y than your group? If the 95% of the users doesn't care, 3% says delete and 2% say no, is that anywhere less valid? – Braiam Oct 17 '18 at 15:09
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    @Braiam: Do they have hundreds of votes supporting their version of what "Not An Answer" means? The community consensus does. And again. In fact, that users supporting a competing idea of NAA were not supporting that interpretation on meta but simply flagging left and right was already a problem which Shog mentioned in his post (first link). Some things never change. – Ben Voigt Oct 17 '18 at 15:15
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    @HansPassant I don't want to babysit a chatroom and I can't judge if the caretakers are participating out of boredom or because they see the value of having a canonical library of Q/A;s. That said: I still think a lot of things go right and a few go wrong. A win here is that the things that do go wrong are noticed and are then discussed om meta. That should enable us to formulate guidance to the best of our abilities. I don't expect it ever to be easy but we'll keep trying for the next 6 to 8 weeks. I value your feedback, I'll see if I can transform that into something that is actionable . – rene Oct 17 '18 at 15:29
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    @BenVoigt No one here is talking about NaA flags but you as far as I can see. These are answers that were deleted via delete votes from 20k+ rep users who reviewed the posts and voted to delete as was within their purview. The system handles consensus for us by requiring more than a single vote to delete things. The post you linked has absolutely nothing at all to do with delete votes. – user4639281 Oct 18 '18 at 0:17
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    @BenVoigt I think it's because the privilege article on delete votes uses the same language as NAA flags: The answer is extremely low quality: There is little to no scope for improvement. The answer doesn't attempt to answer the question; it may be a comment or a separate question altogether. – BSMP Oct 18 '18 at 7:48
48

I wouldn't regard the language of an answer as particularly important in many cases. I quite often search for information about Android or iOS, which I'm programming in C#. And often the questions and answers are in Swift, Objective-C, Java or whatever. They still give me the information I need. And sometimes people have added additional C# answers to questions that were framed in Swift or Java - and those are even more helpful to me. Occasionally questions were phrased in Xamarin/C#, but they got a Swift/Java answer, explaining the OS function to use: those are also helpful. So answers that don't match my language, and/or don't match the question language are still perfectly useful.

In general, the crux of many questions revolves around either: the concept of how to implement an algorithm; or the OS commands to use to achieve something. In both cases the language used isn't particularly important, and indeed pseudo-code may be quite adequate for the first. Questions where the meat of the question involves some technical detail of the language itself (such as details of type casting, inheritance, etc.) are probably rather in the minority.

So please don't go around the site deleting every, otherwise accurate, answer you find in the "wrong" language. Such vandalism would remove plenty of content that is useful to me.

That's not to say that answers in the correct language aren't better. And in some cases the details of the language are important, and might render an answer largely useless.

In the specific case you mention, you say it asks about an algorithm, and Java was only mentioned as a tag. It seems likely, therefore, that readers will find the question via Google quite easily if they are using other languages. There's a good chance many, possibly even a majority, of the people arriving on the page are NOT using Java.

If the question wasn't good and already has numerous good answers, the answers in your case might be rather useless - but only because they are more fluff on a bad question.

And finally, regarding policy, my understanding was that inaccuracy was not a grounds for deleting an answer at all? Rather it should be downvoted, ideally with a comment explaining why the answer is wrong.

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    From this perspective, perhaps it's best to examine whether the question can be edited slightly to indicate Java solutions are preferred but others might be acceptable. In this case, though, the non-Java answers where in completely unrelated (though not necessarily incompatible) languages (Haskell and Python, respectively). – TylerH Oct 17 '18 at 15:35
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    @TylerH: If you didn't know it was in a different language, and just treated the answer as pseudo-code, would it still be useful? If it would be useful as pseudo-code, do not penalize the answerer for using pseudo-code that he compiled and tested before posting. – Ben Voigt Oct 17 '18 at 16:36
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    As an aside. I've seen answers written in the language of a question, and then other authors add supplementary answers saying things such as "Here is XYZ's answer in Python..." or "This is the c# version...". And those extra answers have received multiple upvotes. They were clearly useful to (some of) the community, albeit probably not to the one person who asked the question. – Stuart Whitehouse Oct 17 '18 at 17:35
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    This opinion appears to be very mobile specific. In web and desktop code, this sort of cross language usefulness is extremely uncommon. You'll typically implement the same thing in very different ways in different languages. The question mentions Python, C++, and Haskell, which are all rare on mobile and have very different norms and available functionality than Java. Barring actually invoking C++ from Python (which is not particularly uncommon for libraries), I expect that the answers would be irrelevant to each other. – jpmc26 Oct 17 '18 at 18:13
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    Delete-voting answers is a 20k privilege/responsibility. Part of that is to deletevote answers where "the answer is extremely low quality: There is little to no scope for improvement". That doesn't explicitly include technical inaccuracy, but it's commonly believed it does. However, technical inaccuracy isn't the point in this question (i.e. "inaccuracy" implies more than mismatched language; perhaps poor wording implicitly expanding your meaning). The question is about the language used in the answer not matching the language indicated by the question's tags. – Makyen Oct 17 '18 at 18:43
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    @TylerH: An answer explained using pseudo-code is not a "pseudo answer". If you don't find it useful, it's probably because you haven't had exposure to computer science. That's ok, many programmers haven't... but you're also missing out on a lot of the understanding. – Ben Voigt Oct 17 '18 at 19:19
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    @StuartWhitehouse I think you have to balance the sensibility of turning a question about Java with 15 Java answers into a question about Java with 15 answers and 15 other answers in 15 other different languages. At some point you should be asking a different question, and honestly I think if people want to know how to do something in 15 different languages, we should have 15 different questions. The whole point of Stack Overflow is that you get exactly the answer you want when searching/asking a question. Having to wade through 15 non-Java answers is no different from a bunch of forum chatter – TylerH Oct 17 '18 at 19:22
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    @BenVoigt I don't disagree there is some merit to pseudo code over no code. I just expect answerers to try harder. If someone asks for pseudo code or doesn't specify a language, that's one thing. But if someone asks how to do something in Java, why bother posting pseudo code instead of just writing the answer in Java? – TylerH Oct 17 '18 at 19:23
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    @TylerH: Because code is not an answer. An explanation is an answer. Code in the answer should facilitate the explanation, not copy+paste. SO is an encyclopedia of answered questions, not a library of code snippets. – Ben Voigt Oct 17 '18 at 19:25
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    @BenVoigt That misses the point of my comment. In all instances of "answer" in my previous comments I am referring to answers with both code and accompanying explanatory text. I agree the code-only answers without any explanation, pseudo-code or otherwise, are problematic. – TylerH Oct 17 '18 at 19:25
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    @TylerH: Bloated code does not facilitate the explanation. Code which is short and to the point and not intermixed with boilerplate makes the answer easier to understand. I disagree that providing a uncomplicated explanation is somehow "not trying hard enough". Questions should be SSCCE because the person asking doesn't know what is relevant. Answers should be more minimal than that, because the expert writing does know what is relevant. – Ben Voigt Oct 17 '18 at 19:27
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    Then the technologies the question(s) are about in your case, are Android and iOS, not programming languages. If you post a question tagged Android and then get answers about MS Windows, they should be deleted. – Lundin Oct 18 '18 at 6:52
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    @Lundin - but that's rather my point. These were all questions tagged, eg, Objective-c (as well as iOS). And may have contained partial code in Objective-c. But the meat of the question was really the OS - and so when someone adds the Swift translation as an extra answer that is useful to many readers. A question tagged ios10 may get supplementary answers "and in iOS 11 you can now..." But OP implies they would delete all these. The question that triggered this meta was about an algorithm - and only mentioned Java when the poster was forced to add at least 1 tag. – Stuart Whitehouse Oct 18 '18 at 7:36
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    So when someone adds a Haskell answer to that same question about android, that's fine? No it makes no sense and should be deleted. That's what the OP says should be deleted. Answers that don't make any sense because they are written in a language completely irrelevant to the question. The most they will ever do is waste the time of those reading it. If someone wants to do it in Haskell, they should ask how to do it in Haskell. Not answers that target a different version of the same platform being asked about, or questions about a platform and get answers in multiple applicable languages. – user4639281 Oct 19 '18 at 1:05
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    There's also a confounding factor in this specific case that's it's not very clear that the question was ever intended to be Java specific. As per S.L. Barth's comment under the question, it was written in a language agnostic manner, and Java only added as a tag when the poster was forced to add a tag. So it's plausible in this specific case it was actually intended to be largely language agnostic. That's uncertain, but it seems to make the case for deleting other answers rather weak – Stuart Whitehouse Oct 19 '18 at 10:39
25

If you think a given answer is unhelpful, then you should be downvoting it. You shouldn't be deleting answers because you don't think they're good answers to the question.

Whether an answer in a different language is still useful is a matter of opinion, and opinion that you're more than welcome to reflect with your votes on the post, and that others will be able to voice their opinions on. It's a very context-dependent issue. Some answers in other languages can be very useful, some aren't. Either way, deleting is not how you reflect your opinion of the usefulness of an answer.

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    "You shouldn't be deleting answers because you don't think they're good answers to the question." There's nothing in the entire site, except this answer that suggest this. The criteria for deleting answers is a non-exhaustive list which use the language of "do not fundamentally answer the question". – Braiam Oct 17 '18 at 14:26
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    @Braiam Posts being not an answer doesn't mean, "I don't think this is a good answer to the question", it means, "this answer isn't attempting to answer the question". It means things like clarifying questions, or people asking new questions, or replies to other answers, not answers that, in your opinion, are incorrect or unhelpful. There is a mechanism for indicating that you think an answer is incorrect or unhelpful, downvotes. – Servy Oct 17 '18 at 14:29
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    Especially when a group act together to cast multiple delete votes rapidly. Such block voting seems to entirely side-step the ability of the community as a whole to express an opinion – Stuart Whitehouse Oct 17 '18 at 17:37
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    @StuartWhitehouse 10K-ers can hangout on /Tools and achieve the same effect. If timing is an issue create a feature request that prevents delete votes in quick succession. Keep in mind that will also block quick deletion of posts where we all agree on the needed outcome. – rene Oct 17 '18 at 17:49
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    @rene The problem here is not the quick deletion of bad content, the problem is deletion, whether quick or slow, of content that doesn't merit deletion. Basically anything that should actually be deleted, should be deleted as quickly as possible. – Servy Oct 17 '18 at 17:54
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    This is rules for the sake of rules. Not practical application of those rules. A Python answer has no business on a vanilla Java question. It does not answer the question; it is pure clutter. – jpmc26 Oct 17 '18 at 18:55
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    @jpmc26 And yet several people have given examples of answers using other languages that were very helpful in solving their problem, so clearly that's just not true in a general sense. And of course I may feel that lots of various attempts to answer a question, even using the language the post is tagged with, aren't useful answers, and I might feel that the answer has no business being there. The difference is that I don't feel that just because I'm of the opinion that it's not useful others shouldn't even be allowed to express their own opinions. – Servy Oct 17 '18 at 19:01
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    @Servy Exactly. Your answer is phrased as an absolute, but it's context dependent. There are also examples of when another language is totally irrelevant to the question. Would you accept an r answer to a pandas question? I wouldn't. They're too disconnected, despite being suitable for similar purposes. It wouldn't answer the question and deserves to be deleted. – jpmc26 Oct 17 '18 at 19:06
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    @jpmc26 Are there so many people posting answers that aren't useful, as a result of using the wrong language, that they're obscuring useful answers? Do you have examples of cases where people aren't able to get the solution to their problem because others are posting answers in other languages? It's not about wanting the site to be a mess, it's about wanting the community to be able to give feedback on the quality of actual answers, rather than having a few people decide that since they don't like it, no one else should even be allowed to weigh in on it. – Servy Oct 17 '18 at 19:14
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    @jpmc26 Now you're just describing a code dump answer, in which the answer is in a different language than the question. Honestly I find most such answers to not be useful even if they're in the right language. If, however, it's an answer that explains the problem, how to approach solving it, in clear simple steps, often no code is needed at all. If there is some examples provided in another language, the answer may well be a useful answer even if people can't understand the code at all (or just treat it as pseudocode, which is basically what you should do in such situations). – Servy Oct 17 '18 at 19:16
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    @Servy the same argument applies against NaA, VLQ, and even spam. Deleting any of those things prevents others from being able to reflect their opinion of whether or not it is NaA, VLQ, or spam. We don't need the entire community's opinion about whether or not a given answer is low quality (therefor warranting deletion) or not. We only need the consensus of as many people as is required by the system. I've never seen anywhere that we shouldn't use delete votes for low quality content, and if those voting believe that such an attempted answer is low quality then a delete vote is warranted. – user4639281 Oct 17 '18 at 19:24
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    @Servy Java experts shouldn't be expressing their opinion on the quality of a Python answer in the first place, unless they are also Python experts, in which case they can do so on a Python question. The large differences between languages is why we have a community norm of dividing questions by language, even if they appear to be performing the same task, in the first place. These delete votes enforce that norm, and they are thus appropriate for the same reasons that we have the norm to begin with. – jpmc26 Oct 17 '18 at 19:47
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    @Servy 2) "It's how you indicate something isn't an answer at all, not that it's an answer that you don't think is useful." Again, I'll give you that it may or may not be acceptable to use delete votes to express opinions on the usefulness of a post (debatable), but delete votes are definitely not limited to just answers that aren't attempts to answer the question, that is the NaA flag. Delete votes can be used for that, but they can also be used for other things like ... – user4639281 Oct 17 '18 at 23:42
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    ... duplicate answers, low quality answers, bad answers, answers that suggest doing very bad things in a misleading manner, answers that are technically inaccurate or altogether incorrect, etc, etc. – user4639281 Oct 17 '18 at 23:42
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    Of course they are off-topic. stackoverflow.com/help/on-topic is not an exhaustive list. Similarly, giving an answer in another language than English is off-topic too, even though the above link doesn't say so. – Lundin Oct 18 '18 at 13:34
10

For C# and VB.NET, sometimes an OP will be happy with an answer in either language even if they don't state so in the question because the question is more to do with the framework rather than the language. Sometimes they won't.

It is often not onerous to translate between the two if the answerer didn't notice the language and the OP doesn't currently understand the other one.

So sometimes it is OK with that pair of languages.

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    Good point. Although you should delete the answer/question for using VB.NET ;) – Display name Oct 17 '18 at 9:00
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    The same is true for Managed C++, F#, IronPython or any .NET language, as long as the question has to do with the framework and not the language syntax or unique features in the language. Admittedly, C# and VB.NET have almost complete language feature parity, so it's easier to convert between one and the other. – Zev Spitz Oct 17 '18 at 9:39
  • they ARE diverging slowly. Someone i know used an automatic conversion tool plugin in vb,net and had 147 errors afterwards. – John Lord Oct 17 '18 at 13:22
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    @JohnLord: 99% likelihood those were caused by bugs in the conversion tool, and not feature differences between the languages. – Ben Voigt Oct 17 '18 at 14:53
  • one that springs to mind immediately is that you can not declare an array in c# directly while using an index that is another variable. You can do this in vb.net. C# required him to rework it into declaring an arraylist and outputting that to an array. – John Lord Oct 17 '18 at 20:14
  • Another is you can't declare enums inside interfaces in c#, but can in vb - that really causes an automatic converter problems! – Stuart Whitehouse Oct 17 '18 at 20:37
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    @JohnLord: I'm having a hard time visualizing a situation that would be an array declaration in one language and require a List<T> in another (and ArrayList is never ever needed). The situations where the index is variable can be done via assignment into the array after creation (which is what array initializers do anyway, because .NET does not support initialized arrays, they are always created empty and then filled in) – Ben Voigt Oct 18 '18 at 23:20
  • @StuartWhitehouse: Nested types in .NET are an interesting beast. Nesting doesn't survive the compilation process, they get converted to an independent type in the namespace combined with a private-access permission (similar to friend in C++). And an interface has no private members to give access to, so a type nested inside an interface is no different from an funny-named type in the same namespace. – Ben Voigt Oct 18 '18 at 23:31
  • well i posted that example from a college professor telling me that, but i was actually unable to reproduce it. Redimensioning arrays IS a valid comparison though. vb has a keyword "Preserve" that doesn't exist in c# and c# resizes arrays with a .resize method that vb doesn't have. – John Lord Oct 19 '18 at 13:20
  • @ZevSpitz Nitpicking here, but C++/CLI could be a giant mess of incompatibility for a C# question if not done properly; unlike C#, all of C++ is in C++/CLI, including the parts of C++ that C# has no real substitute for. – jrh Oct 20 '18 at 1:31
5

It is completely context dependent. There is no general answer.

  • For mobile, answers that demonstrate the OS functionality required might be useful even if presented in another language.
  • Some languages/frameworks are designed to target the same platform from the get go (e.g., C# and VB.NET both target .NET, Swift and Objective-C are both used for iOS). Thus it's often useful to be able to translate between them and answers given in another language than the asking one may still be relevant.
  • Meanwhile, Python and Java have almost nothing in common unless you're way out in left field using Jython. Their norms and standard APIs are so different that a Python answer to a Java question is irrelevant and vice versa. If someone wants to approach the same problem in each language, those belong in different questions because the answers will probably be completely disparate.

So the answer is evaluate the context. If there's some link between the languages that means the answer informs the question as originally asked and developers of the question's original language can reasonably evaluate the quality of the answer, then it is a valid answer. If not, it's invalid and belongs as an answer on another question that is appropriately tagged with target language and relevant libraries.

  • Does "context" include a couple of answers with different working implementations in the mentioned language, and others simply translating it to Python/C#/Brainfuck/whatever? Or even making an honest attempt in a different language, but being the 6th or later answer, thus down the list in the noise? – Adriaan Oct 17 '18 at 18:58
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    @Adriaan No. If I need a Python implementation of an algorithm that happens to have a working Java implementation, that's a new question. Python's norms and API are so different that the entire approach might need to be adjusted. A naïve port may make for a poor answer to that question, so it needs to be in a question tagged with that language so experts can review it. – jpmc26 Oct 17 '18 at 19:00
  • I think your first 2 are rather the same point, although narrowing it down unnecessarily. The logic applies to any API addressable from various languages - it could be the OS whether mobile or desktop, the .net framework, or various web services. I agree though that the usefulness of a wrong language does depend. But this meta question was phrased as "it was in the wrong language, therefore we deleted it", rather than "it was in a different language which behaves very differently and therefore..." – Stuart Whitehouse Oct 17 '18 at 20:32
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    @StuartWhitehouse They're example situations, not points of argument. The fact that evaluation needs to be made is the point of saying it's context dependent. – jpmc26 Oct 17 '18 at 23:23
  • No need to use Jython. You can run Python on the JVM with GraalVM. But if it's an algorithm question, and you give me a Python solution, I can just port it to Java. I'd rather have a working Python / Haskell / Elixir / Smalltalk solution I need to port than no answer to my algorithm question. Guess what people, polyglot programmers are a thing. – David Conrad Oct 19 '18 at 18:57
1

This is very simple.

If the question is such that only answers in the listed programming language are relevant, answers in different programming languages are off-topic and should be deleted. They are not only unhelpful, they are actively harmful. A perfect example is C++ answers to C questions.

Otherwise, if a question is about a certain technology used by many different languages, or if it is a question with examples in one particular language, answers in different languages are fine.

NOTE: If a question was previously tagged with multiple languages but has been edited, answers in one of the previously listed languages should be left alone. Thus we must always check edit history of the question before deleting answers.

-3

In the scenario you described I would question whether or not the moderator realized the answer you deleted was in a different programming language.

If I had asked a question and tagged a specific programming language, I would expect all answers to be offered in that programming language. If I had not specified a language, I would expect answers to be offered in whatever language the person answering was most comfortable with.

If a programming language is specified by the OP I would consider any answers provided in other languages to be incorrect/not an answer.

  • A language was specified, not through literal mention in the text, but by adding the java tag. The mod would know about that, provided comments on the answer are visible in whatever flag-handle dialogue mods get; as the first sentence in the answer was "This is my Haskell implementation" and a comment was posted stating that the question was in java. – Adriaan Oct 17 '18 at 8:31
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    So if you're asking about an algorithm you'll consider pseudo-code to not be an answer? I'd say it's an attempt at showing you how to solve the problem, now you just need to translate the code. – ivarni Oct 17 '18 at 8:44
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    @ivarni, I would only consider pseudo-code not an answer if I specifically indicated a language. If I didn't specify a language, pseudo-code (or any language the person was familiar with) would be perfectly acceptable. – Ben Bloodworth Oct 17 '18 at 8:59
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    i would probably just downvote the wrong languages – John Lord Oct 17 '18 at 13:23
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    Not An Answer is for things that are not attempts to answer the question, not for answers that you think are wrong, unhelpful, incorrect, or otherwise not a good answer to the question. – Servy Oct 17 '18 at 14:02
  • I stand corrected. I was using my own interpretation of what an answer should be. I looked around a little bit and found this explanation of how to properly use the NAA flag. – Ben Bloodworth Oct 17 '18 at 14:15
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    @BenBloodworth Good that you realized that. I'd also recommend reading this MSE post about how to classify between as answers, non-answers, and low-quality posts. – Filnor Oct 17 '18 at 14:25
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    Note that the answer linked is still highly disputed because in other communities they consider anything that doesn't address the question not an answer to the question asked. In other words, whenever you posted something that answer any question vs that it answers the question. – Braiam Oct 17 '18 at 14:34
-12

What to do with answers in a different programming language than the one asked for?

First of all, is the question even a good question? Is it clear and precise in what it's asking? Much of the trouble identifying bad answer come from the problem of correctly interpreting the question. Remember, answers are supposed to answer the question asked, but if the question is ambiguous, how can you establish that?

If the question itself has problems, you would have problem evaluating the answer objectively and therefore reaching any form of common context that you can start discussions. On other hand, the language can be just pseudo-like code, in which case, the answer themselves aren't restricted either.

If the above doesn't exist, then these answers are not even a partial answer to the question and therefore fair play for moderation. Of course, if the question is complete and answerable without specifying any language at all, then the language of the answer doesn't matter.

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