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I flagged this question with the message:

This question should clearly be closed (either Too Broad, or looking for software recommendation), however I can't flag it due to the open bounty. Per this meta question, I am flagging it for moderator attention.

However, it was declined with the message:

please use the standard close reasons to close questions, rather than the 'requires moderator attention' flags

I suspect this is just a case of moving too quickly, but I'd like a mod to take a second look.

Also, how can I improve my custom message to help avoid this issue?

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    Reorder it to first say "This question has a bounty, but it should instead be closed because..." – user400654 Oct 12 '18 at 19:02
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    @Machavity I think you've missed the main point of my message. I raised the mod flag because I could not flag it for closure directly due to the open bounty. (Which was the recommended solution I found after searching meta meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/252192/…) – Vlad274 Oct 12 '18 at 20:21
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    @Machavity they did mention the bounty, but in the middle of the message. – Glorfindel Oct 12 '18 at 20:21
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    @Glorfindel TLDR: Don't bury the lede :( – Vlad274 Oct 12 '18 at 20:22
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    Ah, misread. Sorry about that – Machavity Oct 12 '18 at 21:05
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I declined the flag. I missed the bounty part. I'm sorry, it was my fault.

The only improvement to the flag would be "This post has a bounty ..." In reality there was nothing wrong with the flag it was still me not paying attention.

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To address the comment and give some more info:

Do moderators get the same sort of "are you paying attention?" tests that high-rep users are sometimes forced to go through for review actions? It seems to me that the moderation mistakes explicitly called out would indicate many more grudgingly slide. Moderators obviously aren't infallible, but I haven't seen action to avoid mistakes apart from "try better". An option to challenge declined flags with text-box could get it a second careful look. It would also work for "standard close reasons" incorrectly declined (part of the reason custom moderation is used in the first place). Not sure what some of the emphasis is for

Mods do not have flag handling audits, we are audited by other mods and the community team privately. We are also called out publicly on meta (sometimes in comments on the site). It would be difficult to infer how many mistakes are "missed", as some people don't like declined flags and tend to be vocal about it, then there's other people who probably don't watch (or even know) if their flags are declined.

In the past 30 days the mods have handled 77.7k flags. 234.5k flags in the last 3 months. Anything to slow down that process would make flag handling untenable. In fact some mods and members of the community team write user scripts to make flag handling easier.

I made this particular mistake when I was trying to make a dent in the queue the other day, as we had a lot of unhandled flags waiting in the queue. I handled hundreds (500? at a guess) of flags in the one day. That's where these types of mistakes are more likely to happen. This isn't an excuse, explains what happened. Again, sorry this happened.

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    I guess even the moderator queue can have inattentive reviewers once in a while. – Nissa Oct 12 '18 at 23:41
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    @StephenLeppik ikr. Mod queue robo flag handling. :/ – Yvette Colomb Oct 12 '18 at 23:42
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    Do moderators get the same sort of "are you paying attention?" tests that high-rep users are sometimes forced to go through for review actions? It seems to me that the moderation mistakes explicitly called out would indicate many more grudgingly slide. Moderators obviously aren't infallible, but I haven't seen action to avoid mistakes apart from "try better". An option to challenge declined flags with text-box could get it a second careful look. It would also work for "standard close reasons" incorrectly declined (part of the reason custom moderation is used in the first place). – user10461681 Oct 13 '18 at 0:38
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    @Watcher I don't understand the emphasis on "many more grudgingly slide". No we don't' get tests we either get called out privately in hat by other mods or the community team get called out publicly on meta when we make mistakes. Anything that would slow down mod flag handling would not be a good idea. There's a load of flags handled every day as it is. It's fatigue that causes these types of mistakes. I'll edit my answer to address this comment. – Yvette Colomb Oct 13 '18 at 2:27
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    When you are in the flag queue can you see there is a bounty on the question? If not, the mod userscript might want to add that (assuming a formal FR will take 6 to 8 weeks). That doesn't rule out that this mistakes will happen but when available there is better chance a mod make the right connection. – rene Oct 13 '18 at 9:30
  • Depends @rene. Depends on the flag type - comment or post flag. I tend to open a new tab if there's anything at all complex about the flag (which is 90% or more of mod post flags). Which is my advice when telling people using the review queues. I literally missed the bounty part and declined saying use a standard close reason, as we get a few of those flag types. Yeh I could ask Samuel to write a script for that. – Yvette Colomb Oct 13 '18 at 10:01
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    @Yvette If a flag is "incorrectly" declined, significant extra effort is needed to "appeal" in meta/otherwise. I believe OP here is the exception to the rule. I suspect many more let the decline slide; and do so grudgingly; believing their effort to improve quality are unappreciated and mods are "rushing", not giving the flags due diligence. (True anecdote: I used to close flag but after too many 'bad' declines started flagging less obvious items to mods so I could add a text reason. Mods started to kick back with "not our job", and I got of trying. istm that things are still bad.) – user10461681 Oct 13 '18 at 10:35
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    @Yvette To address the second part of your comment: "Anything that would slow down mod flag handling would not be a good idea". Moderators are just as fallible as high-rep users. I consider it unreasonable that it's deemed acceptable to waste high-rep user's time with ad-hoc tests (that are questionable in their reliability in any case); yet mods are welcome to make mistakes. (I'm fundamentally opposed to some people being "more equal" than others - mods included.) That aside: mods making mistakes can be a much bigger waste of time when flags are incorrectly declined. – user10461681 Oct 13 '18 at 10:47
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    @Watcher a declined flag is not a big deal. Let's not blow it up out of proportions. On 5000 post flags I have 26 declined flags. That are insignificant error rates, even if all those declines were incorrect. No builtin appeal process is going to help improve that flag handling. – rene Oct 13 '18 at 11:18
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    @YvetteColomb We should convince the Stack Exchange owners to open more moderators positions to make the work less socially time consuming. – Cœur Oct 13 '18 at 16:21
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    @Cœur eh they're pretty good at doing that. Sounds like a good idea with the increasing comment flag situations meta.stackexchange.com/questions/313872/… – Yvette Colomb Oct 13 '18 at 16:25
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    "...I was trying to make a dent in the queue the other day, as we had a lot of unhandled flags waiting in the queue" - well, that's why I - so long ago! - raised this request: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/278927/… :) – David says reinstate Monica Oct 13 '18 at 17:08
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    @Yvette I'd say it's somewhat disingenuous to insinuate I claimed OP is "upset" when my point was that OP took the extra effort appeal the declined flag here, but that other flaggers might not and may feel unappreciated. I'd also say it's rather antagonistic to make accusations of "private agendas" when you don't agree with a suggestion. The veracity or otherwise of your accusations is irrelevant. It's simply an attack on my character that draws attention away from the substance of the discussion; and extremely unbecoming of a moderator. Thanks to Cœur and David for staying on point. – user10461681 Oct 14 '18 at 0:49
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    @watcher that is a separate FR, in general I think users have no clue about the amount of flags that mods handle. The mods that work hard are bound to do mistakes, but in general my experience (after raising 12000 flags), these mistakes are few (maybe 0.001%) all this to state, thanks for your work Yvette (when I see mods saying they are sorry on meta, it's a sign of a mod working hard) – Petter Friberg Oct 14 '18 at 9:12
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    and a sign of humility, something we sure need more of here and in the world. Thank you Yvette and all mods for your unpaid efforts at improving the work of this community and in your ability to admit wrong, while rarely getting credit for what you all do right – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 14 '18 at 21:43

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