It has earlier been asked whether we can have a "blatantly off-topic" close reason button analogous to the "blatantly..." flag reason. That isn't exactly what I'm asking, because "blatantly off-topic" isn't a super helpful message for the OP.

TL;DR:

Can we have an off-topic close reason button that reads, "off-topic because not about programming or software development tools [...] as described in the help center", please?

Or similar wording (please improve). Because, compared to the current custom close reason system, where one is forced to manually point out the obvious (examples below), it would:

  • Be less patronizing, and at the same time clearer and more concise (a rare gem of a combination).
  • Lower the effort barrier for close-voters. (cf. length of close queue)
  • Invite less snark.

This is a follow up on this answer.

I know there's an option to write in your own custom close reason. And indeed I often end up mechanically typing "because it's about not programming" as custom off-topic reason.

Because sometimes, there really isn't much more to say without sounding patronizing and/or ridiculous.

In the archetypal example

How do I get a boyfriend?

or even

How do I establish contact with recruiters at software company X?

I guess I could specify a custom close reason that says

[... because] it's about personal/professional relationships.

Why force me to compose that and then type it? What value has this created? The OP already knows. The reader already knows. Why incite me to patronize them?

Why not just point out that "it isn't about programming", which is why it's off-topic! (Whereas pointing out that "it's about personal relationships" may, or may not, say something about why it's on-topic elsewhere – which is something different.)

Alternatively, I could in principle expand on my reasoning:

"[because...] asking for contact information does not constitute programming, unless you are using an API to do so, and if so provide a MCVE. Programming is when you write lines of code in a programming language or use technology to develop software powered by an automated machine, whereas this contact information lookup request appears to be manual."

or something like that. Okay, that's more complete, but is it worth the keystrokes? Is it more useful? No, it's less useful because silly fluff & clutter. Is it more polite? No, it's patronizing. At least that's kinda how I would receive it myself.


Instead, based on common sense, I effectively act as though there were a generic "off-topic" button by mechanically pasting in "not about programming", because that's what provides the clearest information in the most concise way.

Which leads me to what I'd really like:

A generic "not about programming" off-topic close-reason radio button

alongside the other ones. Because it would save me and all other close voters those repetitive keystrokes, and because it would generally help people point out the real close reason in a nice and clean way. And remove the temptation to write in a snarky custom close reason.

By all means, leave the custom close reason there as well, for edge cases. But for edge cases only. What I'm describing above ain't no edge case.

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    I wonder if this might be a better fit on Meta Stack Exchange, as a generic "not within the scope of this community" close reason might apply anywhere. – Wrigglenite Oct 8 at 10:42
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    @Wrigglenite It would apply, but it would not be quite as helpful a message to the OP. I think each community should have their own "off-topic because {insert something helpful here}" message. – Jean-François Corbett Oct 8 at 10:51
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    @Wrigglenite many sites already have a generic "off-topic because it is not about <scope of site>" close reason. Stack Overflow and several of the larger ones do not – psubsee2003 Oct 8 at 11:17
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    You won't get it, CMs will fret that it will get abused. But above all, you don't need it. Nobody is going to answer it, the OP isn't going to edit it, having to find 7 more users to look at this trash is pretty horrible. It takes only one DV to get rid of it, eventually. – Hans Passant Oct 8 at 11:24
  • The easiest way would probably be to simply change the wording and the displayed reason for the current "Blatantly off-topic"-flag, eh? Same meaning, more words, easier to understand, MORE WELCOMING POINTS. – Seth Oct 8 at 12:13
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    @Seth the "blatantly off-topic flag does not exist once you get Close Vote privileges. It is replaced with a custom close reason option. that is essentially what this question is asking for - a "blatantly off-topic" close reason for close voters – psubsee2003 Oct 8 at 12:22
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    @Jean-FrançoisCorbett: It would be good to see how often custom close reasons are used vs. the existing ones. Because if the ratio is extremely low, then it's clear that these kinds of "not about programming" questions that also aren't about general computing or server/networking stuff don't happen often enough to need a specialized close reason. – Nicol Bolas Oct 8 at 13:53
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    "it would be less patronizing, and at the same time clearer and more concise" Less patronizing, clearer and more concise than what? – TylerH Oct 8 at 14:02
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    @TylerH "Compared to the current custom close reason system" ... as per the examples given in the question. I can clarify that in my text... – Jean-François Corbett Oct 8 at 14:30
  • @Jean-FrançoisCorbett I think there's a different issue here. If you think the custom close reason is patronizing, snarky, or less clear/concise... that may be a personal problem, by which I mean... you are the one writing the custom close reason... so if that custom message is snarky or patronizing, then that's because of what you wrote. It is just as easy to write the custom message of "I am voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about programming as defined by the Help Center". Nothing snarky/patronizing there, and it is very concise. You can even use help center in it. – TylerH Oct 8 at 14:38
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    We already have this. A majority of votes to close for a custom reason will provide exactly this message. – Tiny Giant Oct 8 at 14:55
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    @TinyGiant ... after having forced the close voters to type useless stuff, as discussed in the question. So we don't quite have that. – Jean-François Corbett Oct 8 at 15:02
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    @Jean-FrançoisCorbett You don't have to type very much. I just tested this for science. You can just erase the " because" in the default "I'm voting to close this question because" and add a period to get "I'm voting to close this question." as the comment. You can then delete the comment immediately after and further votes for that reason do not leave a comment. Based on my recollection, the resulting close banner is the same as (or very similar to) the text you suggest in your question (I didn't test this but I do recall it being very similar). – Tiny Giant Oct 8 at 16:31
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    Anyhoo, most commenters and answerers so far seem to advocate in favor of mechanically typing generic stuff in a text box being good UX (yes, I'm being facetious), so perhaps I should stop struggling and accept that many people like doing things this way and don't want to change it. Still, I don't think it was a "bad idea". – Jean-François Corbett Oct 8 at 20:17
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    And, of course, all the people who write off topic questions have read and understood that :/ – Will Oct 11 at 13:51

Bad idea; it's too vague. If we had it, I bet it'd get used to shoot down all sorts of useful content like language-agnostic algorithm questions or questions about IDE configuration. Such questions are arguably "not about programming" under some (narrow but defensible) definitions of what that means, but are useful and explicitly allowed by the help center.

Questions that really are totally unrelated to programming in any way, like your "How do I get a boyfriend?" example, are rare; I don't know if I've even ever encountered one that wasn't already closed. Typing a custom close reason when you occasionally see one is not a great hardship. Let's not hand the most censorious of our close-voters a vague, general-purpose cudgel with which they'll inevitably go after valuable content, just to save a few keystrokes when dealing with lonely people asking for dating advice.

  • 'explicitly allowed by the help center' [citation needed] last time I read the help center, there needed to be two conditions to be an on topic question, one general for all questions and another for specificity. – Braiam Oct 8 at 13:53
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    @Mark Meh, tweak the text then. "Not about programming or software development tools [blah blah] as described here <some link>." That's what I meant by "Or similar wording." I'm sure you have good ideas. Let's be constructive, yes? – Jean-François Corbett Oct 8 at 14:00
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    @Jean-FrançoisCorbett: The wording isn't really the problem; the question is are there enough questions that need to be closed for this reason? Most off-topicality are covered by the first 2 close reasons (general computing, server/networking). Are there enough "not about programming" questions that get asked that aren't covered by those? Do you have evidence of the prevalence of such questions? – Nicol Bolas Oct 8 at 14:09
  • @NicolBolas What kind of evidence are you looking for? I am describing the annoyance the UX has caused me as a regular close voter. No, I haven't done any quantitative research. As for the wording, if you don't think it's the problem, then take it up with Mark Amery, I believe he was the one making the point that it was the problem; I won't argue with you on that point. – Jean-François Corbett Oct 8 at 14:42
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    @Jean-FrançoisCorbett I think the two points are connected. Worded as you first suggested in the question, I object because the reason is overbroad. But if we were to try to reword it so that it covers only stuff that is both blatantly off-topic and not already covered by existing close reasons (which notably include the "general computing" reason), we'd end up with something like "Not related to computing in any way". At that point I'd no longer object that the reason is overbroad, but would then share the objection voiced by Nicol and by Welcome to Stack Overflow's answer below. – Mark Amery Oct 8 at 15:12
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    @Jean-FrançoisCorbett: Even a few anecdotal examples would help. If this is sufficiently common to need its own close reason, then it shouldn't be hard to find a few examples from the past 7 days. I haven't seen an off-topicality question that neither "general computing" nor "server/network" covered in a long time. – Nicol Bolas Oct 8 at 15:13
  • Why aren’t those topics suggested to be asked in superuser?? – vol7ron Oct 8 at 18:12
  • @vol7ron General computing and hardware questions are suggested for superuser. – jmarkmurphy Oct 8 at 18:13
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    Such as configuring an IDE – vol7ron Oct 8 at 18:14
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    @vol7ron Since IDEs are tools only used for software development, an IDE config question pretty unambiguously satisfies the "your question generally covers… software tools commonly used by programmers; and is a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development" conditions from the Help Center. Why would we want to reject it? – Mark Amery Oct 8 at 18:25
  • @MarkAmery reject may not be the desire, in fact, I’ve entertained such questions with that reasoning. However, Stack Overflow was the first and predates SuperUser and other such forums. Perhaps there is a crossover since “software tools commonly used by programmers is vague” — Linux are Unix utilities are commonly used by programmers and there is a whole community for it. So, instead of reject there may be some opportunity to inform or direct certain questions to other forums, or analyze if the SO criteria should be updated. – vol7ron Oct 8 at 20:47
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    @vol7ron It seems you would like to discuss what is actually on-topic for SO, and I would say that it is off-topic for this specific question. Note that a question can be on-topic for several SE sites, it is not a problem. (a bit like this question would be on-topic for meta.se or any other meta site – by adapting the generic reason a bit) – Didier L Oct 8 at 21:32
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    @AakashM FWIW, I feel like my original, less "inclusive" version of the post was funnier, which is why I chose "women" instead of "people". I'm not sure quite what it is that makes that the case, though, or whether others' sense of humour matches mine, so I've left the edit alone. – Mark Amery Oct 8 at 22:37
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    I just don't understand why some people are so strongly opposed to IDE questions being on Stack Overflow, the tools they use to write the very code that they ask and answer questions about! – BoltClock Oct 9 at 11:19
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    @BoltClock IDE questions, server config questions, pure algorithm questions, HTML semantics questions, questions about configuring cloud APIs, programming questions that require specialist non-programming knowledge to answer, asking whether calling a particular undocumented API will make Apple reject your iOS app, questions about database configuration... all of these topics permit narrow, objectively-answerable questions of relevance only to programmers, but all are somewhere on a spectrum from "contentious" to "outright banned by official consensus". I think we should welcome them all. – Mark Amery Oct 9 at 11:39

We kind of already have this. The message shown in the close banner for every question closed with a custom reason is:

This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.

I realise this isn't a one-click operation in the same way that other close reasons are, and I'm not arguing for or against such a reason. I'm mainly posting this as food for thought.

Now for some statistics. All of these are extracted from the 30 days section of the 10k tools question closure statistics page.

In the past 30 days:

  • 225,820 questions have been asked, and
  • 27,845 questions have been closed,

which puts us at a 12.33% close percentage.

Of those 27,845 question closures, there were:

  • 352 (1.26%) questions closed using a custom reason, and
  • 100 unique custom reasons.

Of those 352 custom reasons, the most common thing typed into the box (45 times) was:

I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about programming.

Some further variations:

10 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because not about programming  
10 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not about programming.  
 9 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not about programming  
 9 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about programming  
 7 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not a programming question.  
 6 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not related to programming.  
 5 times: This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the [help]  
 5 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is not a programming question.  
 5 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not a programming question.  
 5 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it has nothing to do with programming.  
 4 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not a programming question  
 4 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's about electronic circuit design, not programming.  
 3 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this question is not about programming.  
 3 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is not about programming.  
 3 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it isn't about programming.  
 3 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it has nothing to do with programming  
 3 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because is not about programming  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this question is not about programming  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this isn't a programming question  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is not a question  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is not a programming-related question  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this is not a programming question and is not on-topic for Stack Overflow.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this has nothing to do with programming  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this community is about programming questions not curriculum advice.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because its not programming related.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's not directly about programming or software development.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because its not about programming  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it's a hardware problem, not programming.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is unrelated to programming.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not programming related.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about programming as defined by the Help Center.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about a programming problem.  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not a programming question  
 2 times: I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it has absolutely nothing to do with programming.
 2 times: I'm closing this question as off-topic because this is not a programming question.

There were other more verbose variations that I left out because they conveyed something more than "this is not about programming".

Remember our numbers from earlier:

  • 352 custom close reason closures, and
  • 100 unique custom close reasons.

If we add all the custom reasons that do not convey anything more than "this is not about programming" up we get:

  • 185 closures, and
  • 39 unique close reasons.

This means that:

  • 52.56% of questions closed using a custom reason in the past 30 days used a reason that said nothing more than "this is not about programming", and
  • 39% of the unique custom close reasons used in the past 30 days were some variation of "this is not about programming"

Take from this what you will.

On the one hand, this is 52.56% of 1.26% (0.66%) of all the question closures in the past 30 days. On the other hand, it is 52.56% of all custom question closures in the past 30 days.

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    "100 unique custom reasons" note that the 10k tool page is limited to exactly 100 custom reasons. – Braiam Oct 8 at 21:45
  • I figured that was kind of odd, but they are all only 1's at that point so I'm not all that worried about the outliers there. – Tiny Giant Oct 8 at 21:47
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    Actually, even though the breakdown says 352 questions closed using a custom reason, adding up the numbers beside each custom reason listed results in 466, so I'm not sure what's going on there. – Tiny Giant Oct 8 at 22:01
  • Nice answer. Yeh, it's a custom reason I've never thought twice about typing in. Doesn't take long to type it. In fact it took longer to write this comment. – Yvette Colomb Oct 8 at 22:24
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    @TinyGiant: ~114 were closed by two or even three separately-typed custom close reasons. (One or two may have been theoretically closed by as many as five such distinct close reasons.) – Nathan Tuggy Oct 9 at 8:26
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    "In the past 30 days: 225,820 questions have been asked, and 27,845 questions have been closed," Does this take deleted questions into account? – T.J. Crowder Oct 9 at 8:35
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    "Well, this kind of sucks. Wish I could remove it." seems to be a better match for this meta discussion :) – Hans Passant Oct 9 at 9:06
  • Your statistics missed my "not about programming but QA" close reason (question was closed as "off-site resource" but I did supply a custom close reason. – Draco18s Oct 10 at 2:01
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    But how many of those custom close reasons were needlessly provided, instead of selecting the more specific canned reasons such as "Questions about general computing hardware and software are off topic..." and/or "Questions about professional server or networking related infrastructure administration are off topic..."? Why go to the trouble of writing "it's a hardware problem, not programming", or "it's not directly about programming or software development", instead of selecting one of those existing close reasons? Perhaps many/most of those custom comments are redundant? – skomisa Oct 10 at 2:36
  • For the arithmetically disinclined, this is on the order of 1hr of close voter time per month.... To simplify calculations, suppose that all 352 custom-close-reason close votes could be summed up with a canned radio button and assume that it takes a close voter 10s more on average to click the "custom reason" button and compose the phrase "I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is not about programming." than to click a canned button. Then, the addition of the "not about programming" radio button would save close-voters an average of 3520s per month... 3600s == 1hr. – Scott Oct 10 at 13:21
  • @Scott: "suppose that all 352 custom-close-reason close votes could be summed up with a canned radio button" But they can't be. As shown in the post, only a bit over half of them are "not about programming" reasons. And many of those could be handled by "general computing", since apparently, some people equate "general computing" to "go to Super User". That is, they won't use it for Linux/MacOSX/Android "general computing" stuff. So the real number is significantly less than you think. – Nicol Bolas Oct 10 at 22:25
  • @skomisa: Notice how not one of those close reasons is for Windows computing. It's always "this is about Linux" or MacOS or Android or whatever. My guess is that some people equate the "general computing" close reason with "go to Super User", and of course, Linux/MacOS/Android questions are not welcome there. – Nicol Bolas Oct 10 at 22:29
  • @NicolBolas okay, then it's less than 1hr. :) – Scott Oct 11 at 3:56

This feels like a good and valid suggestion, but ideally there'd be statistics to support it.

The ideal stats would be something like:

  • which close reasons are used with what frequency;
  • which close reasons are most often accompanied by explanatory "because" text?
  • what are the top N most common "because" texts for each reason?

Reading those top N reasons should show some which don't closely map to the selected reason; and possibly some reasons which are duplicated across multiple close reasons.

This might show that this is a common case which needs optimizing for. Or it might expose some other case.

But without stats, we're shooting in the dark - we can't tell if this really is a good suggestion, nor not.

I'm not sure how these close reasons could be gathered; does anyone have permission to query the DB and to make that info public? Can a bot gather this info?


Update: @BDL has provided some pretty good stats for this:

Custom close reason was used for 1.26%. 193 were something similar to "off-topic because it's not about programming" in any variant, which are 0.69% of all close-votes. (statistics over the last 30 days). I counted things like "Your question is not about programming, it is about Linux" also, although it's not clear if these would be handled by a specific close reason. Given how easily this close-reason could be misused, I'd say the need is not large enough.

I asked if there were any other close reasons with lower usage:

the only other close-reason that comes close is off-topic > belongs to serverfault (0.63%) then off topic > general computing (2.8%)

This feels, then, like a question that has been ANSWERED WITH SCIENCE! This would help people about 1 time in 150, which is probably not enough to be worth adding.

A counter-argument could be made, that usage would rise over 0.69% if using it didn't require writing stuff, as it does now. But that argument relies on the assumption that people currently select incorrect close reasons when things are off topic, or even avoid voting, rather than type in a custom reason. I'm skeptical.

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    The last statistic you are asking for can not be obtained automaticly. That said, I think feeled experience is the best statistic in this case. In my experience it's not a big problem to find the ideal close reason. In the rarely other case we have custom close reasons (which are forwading the user to another .se page, since migration is not available in 99 % of cases). – Christian Gollhardt Oct 8 at 20:30
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    Statistics: Custom close reason was used for 1.26%. 193 were something similar to "off-topic because it's not about programming" in any variant, which are 0.69% of all close-votes. (statistics over the last 30 days). I counted things like "Your question is not about programming, it is about Linux" also, although it's not clear if these would be handled by a specific close reason. Given how easily this close-reason could be misused, I'd say the need is not large enough. – BDL Oct 8 at 20:42
  • @BDL Them's some good stats! Are there any less-used close reasons than 0.69% of close-votes? If so, I'd say that's good evidence towards replacing that one with this one. If not, then I agree with you: this would be less useful than others. – Dewi Morgan Oct 8 at 20:56
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    @BDL: It should also be noted that the "not about programming, it is about Linux" should be closed with the "general computing" reason. – Nicol Bolas Oct 8 at 21:01
  • @NicolBolas it was followed by a link to unix.SE which is different from the standard close reason. I'm not sure that a "not about programming" reason would cover this, but I tried to state the best-case numbers – BDL Oct 8 at 21:16
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    @DewiMorgan: the only other close-reason that comes close is off-topic > belongs to serverfault (0.63%) then off topic > general computing (2.8%) – BDL Oct 8 at 21:20
  • @BDL Updated question with these stats. Thank you! – Dewi Morgan Oct 8 at 21:33
  • Er, I mean, updated my answer with these stats. Not question. – Dewi Morgan Oct 9 at 2:54
  • One of the problems with custom reasons is that they are all different. I often type "Stack Overflow is for programming questions" and would estimate that I alone have flagged 20-30 questions the last month with this. – tripleee Oct 10 at 13:02
  • Just to colour your conclusion a little bit: it would help a particular kind of person 1 time out of 150, namely close voters. In my opinion, in light of the close queue's length, streamlining the closing process is an extra good thing. – Jean-François Corbett Oct 11 at 7:07
  • Now that stats are available, in the reader's interest, perhaps consider removing the original first part of your answer, because people probably won't read past "but there are no stats and I want stats" if they actually just saw stats in an answer just above. – Jean-François Corbett Oct 11 at 7:10

Yes please. I type this exact statement a dozen times a day at a minimum. Its a rare day I don't hit several questions to close about the business of writing software rather than the programming itself. I'd happily lose most of the other off topic reasons in favor of this, it would be far more useful and applicable.

For me the main problem with

off-topic because it is not about programming.

is that it would also be redundant with several more specific “not about programming” reasons:

  • Questions about general computing hardware and software […] Super User.
  • Questions on professional server- or networking-related infrastructure administration […] Server Fault.
  • This question belongs on another site in the Stack Exchange network >
    • belongs on meta.stackoverflow.com
    • belongs on superuser.com (redundant with above)
    • belongs on tex.stackexchange.com
    • belongs on dba.stackexchange.com
    • belongs on stats.stackexchange.com

So the big risk if we had such a close reason is that it would be the easy choice. People wouldn't make the effort to select one of those reasons and would simply go for "not about programming".

This means we would close the question without giving any hint to the OP on where he might be able to find help.

If anything, I believe that “This question belongs on another site in the Stack Exchange network” should instead allow to search for any network site instead of the currently limited list, and it should be allowed for questions that are too old to migrate (even if it won't be migrated).

I would assume that questions that don't belong to any SE site should be extremely rare.

  • They happen fast enough that the community does one of two things: buries them with their own delete votes, or buries them with the spam flag (if it truly is spam). It's very much the case that it'll live in two distinct categories - either it's a bad and off-topic question or it's spam - and the rarity isn't all that high - but when it hits, it hits... – Makoto Oct 8 at 22:06
  • It's redundant for those 5 specific sub-categories, but not for the infinite number of other sub-categories... Also, not all of those infinite number are covered by existing Stack Exchange sites. – Jean-François Corbett Oct 11 at 7:00

As far as I can remember a question can be moved to a StackExchange site it suits better and there are sites both for questions about relationships and about careers (which would probably close "How do I get a boyfriend?" and "How do I establish contact with recruiters at software company X?" as too broad and too specific respectively, however).

This has happened to me a number of times when my questions (not nearly "blatantly offtopic" but suiting the subject of another site better) were migrated this way and that was how I've discovered a couple of particular StackExchange sites.

IMHO this should be the first thing one should consider doing to an off-topic question - check if there is a site it could suit better and migrate it there perhaps. And for cases that don't suit any of the existing sites subjects, I would rather introduce a special "everything else" site.

"Off-topic" close reason makes sense to exist but it may happen that many people may probably tend to abuse it instead of bothering about migration.

Well, which of the existing "off-topic" reasons should be removed to make room for this one, which is least specific and least helpful of all? The dialog has a limit on how many items fit, and even if it did not, a long laundry list does not belong there.

Do people who get "not about programming" comment ever reply with "thanks for information; I shall think of a programming question to ask instead"? If not, then I doubt it's actually helpful to them.

If keystrokes are an issue, just delete "because" from the pre-filled reason.

I'm voting to close this question as off-topic

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    Another concern that I might have is the gray areas where programming may or may not be involved. Example: Excel. I have seen several questions where someone asks a generic (non-programming) question about Excel, and then someone else with much higher privileges says "This isn't a programming question - go ask somewhere else!" The point is that they can ask both questions in this forum, and a close reason like this could be difficult to train around. – C.A.R. Oct 8 at 13:26
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    FWIW, I totally agree with this, in defiance of the 22 downvotes it currently has. Totally off-topic questions are extremely rare; I don't see any reason to clutter the close-vote dialog with an extra reason that would rarely have any legitimate use. – Mark Amery Oct 8 at 13:54
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    @MarkAmery FWIW, the communities you're a part of probably aren't totally off-topic, but in the less populated tags, you see the quantity of completely offtopic at a significantly higher rate. – TheIncorrigible1 Oct 8 at 13:55
  • @TheIncorrigible1: Does the "general computing" off-topic reason not cover most of those cases? – Nicol Bolas Oct 8 at 14:17
  • I actually agree with this also and am surprised by the downvotes @MarkAmery – Yvette Colomb Oct 8 at 15:33
  • For one, machine learning questions are off-topic if they relate to "pure" machine learning rather than programming, but there is no specific close reason for these. While I'm not sure whether I would like a catch-all close reason, I find it naive to assume that we're dealing with a negligible number of off-topic questions. – E_net4 Oct 8 at 15:48
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    I would recommend looking at the closed question breakdown by reason rather than making assumptions here, @E_net4. – Shog9 Oct 8 at 19:32
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    I'm surprised by the downvotes on this answer since it is actually basically the above up voted answer but more to the point and less "wordy" – Sammaye Oct 8 at 19:51
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    It's probably because of the first sentence, which isn't a realy good argument. That said, since the part after it is good +1 – Christian Gollhardt Oct 8 at 20:19
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    @ChristianGollhardt: It's a pretty good argument, considering 1) the system does have a maximum number of entries for that dialog, so more engineering effort would be needed to add one rather than replace one, and 2) that dialog is already gigantic as is, so adding yet another thing to an already cluttered dialog is probably something that should give one pause. – Nicol Bolas Oct 8 at 20:55
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    Okay, I am not aware of the fact, that the system has a maximum number (If it is an UI thing, it could be adressed). But what I realy mean: If you find the perfect close reason, which solves a realy good problem, you would have to bring the same argument again. When saying it is a bad argument, I realy mean it is an argument which applies to every close reason. @NicolBolas – Christian Gollhardt Oct 8 at 20:59
  • @ChristianGollhardt: The system has a maximum number, and IIRC SO already has a special-cased extra. – Nathan Tuggy Oct 9 at 8:28

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