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Motivation

I am quite fit in Java so I want to help people with their Java questions, but when I look at new questions with the Java tag, the vast majority of them relate to features of third-party libraries that I know nothing about so I give up after a while.

A lot of people seem to be frustrated by this, as shown by the many related questions linked to Is it OK to use language-specific tags for problems with that are not directly connected to coding in such language?.

Problem

Those questions come to the conclusion that there isn't anything one can do about it, because tags are created by people and that this is a folksonomy where you can't force millions of people to assign meta tags like "pure-java" or "third-party-library" to millions of questions, nor are such meta tags appreciated.

Solution

While I aggree that there isn't a good solution within the current tag system, I propose an enhancement to the tag system that requires a lower curation effort and that could help tackle some problems relating to how hard it pose certain kinds of questions within the tag system:

While there are millions of questions on SO, there are certainly much fewer tags. Unfortunately, I didn't find exact numbers, but one could restrict this solution to a few hundred of the most popular tags at first. A small number of people could now curate the those tags into a taxonomy. This could include meta tags, which are not allowed to be used directly in a question. For example, the tag "jquery" could have two supertags: "library" and "javascript" and "javascript" could have a supertag "programming-language".

This has multiple advantages:

  1. People don't need to use meta tags in their posts, because they are attached to the tags they use.
  2. Meta data is complete and can be relied upon because it is automatically calculated.
  3. People can finally do complex searches, for example for "pure language" specific posts by excluding all subtags of "library".

marked as duplicate by Konrad Höffner, Community Oct 1 '18 at 14:18

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