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This question already has an answer here:

Is there any policy or guideline if I want to extend an existing question (which is ask by someone else) for related query. As example say some one ask following question - "What is the way to do something?"

And many of our fellows answered that question.

But I want to know the best/efficient way like the answer's bench-marking or pros or cons.

Am I need to ask another question for it? Or I can extend that question and ask more deep insight?

Please note that If I ask another question, it could be flagged as a duplicate to the first one.

As of discussion and comment: you should remember that answer may be same with some extended data like response time in a system while using that answer.

marked as duplicate by Robert Longson, Jan Doggen, Code Lღver, Glorfindel discussion Sep 27 '18 at 13:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • no, it not duplicate cause said question's meaning unchangeable. it extend to ask for more insight like response time for a busy system etc. – Shahadat Hossain Khan Sep 27 '18 at 7:40
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    I always say break things down into steps, work on each step. If said step is a problem, research said problem extensively and then if you're still struggling ask a question. I wouldn't then extend that question to include the next problem. I would only include additional information that is relevant to the first problem. – Bugs Sep 27 '18 at 8:38
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    @Bugs I think that is the answer. Note BTW that the OP is asking about modifying another user's question. Their dilemma is that if they ask a new question, it will be closed as a duplicate. – S.L. Barth Sep 27 '18 at 8:43
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    Even if all answers remained valid, the change would still be problematic and I'm not sure what you hope for. For example, "How to parse HTML with RegEx?" has many good and helpful general answers. People vote according to their tastes. Now you change the old question to "What is the fastest way to parse HTML with RegEx?" - might lead to no new answers (helpful?), might change the existing scores (top answer may be the safest approach or the easiest to read code) which is kind of unfair (the restriction was not there when they wrote it) and might still not be enough for you to form an opinion. – user10389796 Sep 27 '18 at 9:06
  • The OP is asking for clarity of how to use the site. This doesn't make it a bad question. – Yvette Colomb Sep 27 '18 at 13:23
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I have to admit that at first I had missed that you were asking about editing someone elses question.

If you want to change the question to get new, different answers, it is obviously a very bad edit, as you are very clearly changing the author's intent.

  1. Editing a question while invalidating existing answers is always bad.
  2. Making edits changing the author's intent is bad as well.
  3. So your proposed course of action is doubly wrong.
  • ok, i agree with you. its wrong and i may not get any new (helpful) answer. so, if someone now ask new question regarding the old question and by extending old question, is should mark as duplicate? – Shahadat Hossain Khan Sep 27 '18 at 9:31
  • It would depend very much on the question. The way not to be flagged as a dupe is to refer to the question and explain why it doesn't answer your question. But again, be careful: best performance questions are very often closable in their own right, nevermind the danger of being a dupe. – yivi Sep 27 '18 at 9:33
  • so, there should be a policy to mark duplicate question. like you did this question, i believe this is not duplicate that you marked with. what you think? @yivi – Shahadat Hossain Khan Sep 27 '18 at 9:38
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    I do not understand your point about a "policy". Your question is probably a dupe of a couple of different questions. I've answered because I think it would be useful to underline the "editing someone elses question" angle, but the answer(s) is(are) the same: do not change a question to alter its scope after it got answers, do not alter of another author with your edits. – yivi Sep 27 '18 at 9:42
  • so, you are telling that i can ask another question based on old question and that will NOT marked as duplicate (because you may not got proper answer if you extend the old question) but answer may same for both question? – Shahadat Hossain Khan Sep 27 '18 at 10:05
  • If the answers are the same for both questions, and one question is based on the other, I am completely sure these are dupes. – yivi Sep 27 '18 at 10:07
  • ok, user may provide same answer + response data or with some extended data. so, is it still duplicate according your opinion? – Shahadat Hossain Khan Sep 27 '18 at 10:09
  • Details are important, so I can't tell without seeing an specific example. But in the general case, yes, it's a dupe. If you want additional answers with more details for an existing question, try your luck with a bounty. – yivi Sep 27 '18 at 10:10
  • so, you tells it vary i.e. you question may not duplicate "just for answer is same"? – Shahadat Hossain Khan Sep 27 '18 at 10:15
  • I do not think it is useful to keep going on in hypotheticals, and this is going further afield from your original question. Read around meta to see how duplicates are handled. – yivi Sep 27 '18 at 10:17
  • ok, thanks for your time. – Shahadat Hossain Khan Sep 27 '18 at 10:18
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You should not edit another person's post to deviate from the original intent of that post. This stands for both questions and answers.

Then as mentioned in this answer https://meta.stackoverflow.com/a/290704/3956566

Roll it back to the original version, if your roll-back is rolled back flag it.

Drastically changing a question - especially one with answers - is not something we want to allow. In the first place it invalidates all the work the answerer(s) put into their answer(s) and could, in extremis, result in them getting undeserved down-votes.

It has also been known for users who are question blocked to change their existing questions in order to get round the ban. This is something we want to stop

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