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Let's say that I would like to search for questions under a specific tag by the following filtering steps:

  1. List all questions within the last 1 months.
  2. Keep only the questions that are unanswered.
  3. Sort them by vote.

Is there a way to do so?

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  • 2
    What have you tried? What link/page/route are you using? Commented Sep 24, 2018 at 19:21
  • This is the page I am monitoring: stackoverflow.com/unanswered/tagged/google-cloud-spanner I can filter in all the unanswered questions, but there is no way to sort by vote and then by time. I have to pick either "Newest" or "Votes" Commented Sep 24, 2018 at 20:03

2 Answers 2

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Refer to the "How do I search?" page.

You would use the hasaccepted:no and created:1m.. parameters.

Like so:
[google-cloud-spanner] hasaccepted:no created:1m..

Direct link to the votes tab:
/search?tab=votes&q=%5bgoogle-cloud-spanner%5d%20hasaccepted%3ano%20created%3a1m..


If you mean the question must have no answers at all, then that is:

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  • He's asking for "unanswered" not "unaccepted". There's probably a parameter for that to.
    – Adriaan
    Commented Sep 24, 2018 at 21:24
  • @Adriaan Mybe answers:0 or isanswered:
    – Ilyes
    Commented Sep 24, 2018 at 21:26
  • @Adriaan, given the OP's confusion (originally tagged as API, for example), it's not clear what he means by unanswered. I went with the "street" definition. If he means something else, there's a parameter for that. Commented Sep 24, 2018 at 21:26
  • @BrockAdams No, here is an example [subquery]isanswered:false
    – Ilyes
    Commented Sep 24, 2018 at 21:29
  • created:1m is not a good option, there is questions which created long time does not have answers.
    – Ilyes
    Commented Oct 7, 2018 at 17:34
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There is a boolean operators you can use them to search in the site.

Here is an example to search non answered questions for :

[sql-server]isanswered:false answers:0

Or this way to exclude the closed posts:

[sql-server]isanswered:false answers:0 closed:false

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