According to Is it acceptable to use Stack Overflow as a Q&A for a specific product?

...we advise against seeding the site with questions about your product. Our community is very sensitive to spam and might see your attempt as such

which suggests that under most circumstances, seeding Stack Overflow with product-related questions (and answers) would not be successful or welcome.

In this specific case however:

  • there already exists a tag for the product ()
  • we see, via our own support channels, several issues that arise over and over again
  • we often see questions being asked about technical problems that are asking slightly the wrong question (example), so even though someone else may have the same issue, the way they frame the question means they don't realise it has been answered
  • we often see questions that are not about our product specifically, but about some technology we use, such as Docker (even if the questioner doesn't realise)

I think we'd be able to formulate a number of questions, and provide answers, that work better as answers for people later searching Stack Overflow.

I am not suggesting a flood of canned questions and answers to be dumped indiscriminately onto Stack Overflow by the way.

What I think might work well would be to:

  • write up particular questions as we receive them through our support channels
  • anonymise and generalise them to be as useful as possible
  • frame them as clear, well-formatted SO questions
  • provide them with comprehensive answers

In a case like this, would adding a series of product-related questions be acceptable?

Update

I have added a first attempt at providing one of these question/answer pairs, at How can I use pip to install Python packages into my Divio Docker project?.

I have tried to make the answer as useful as possible (i.e. not just referring to Divio but explaining the Docker issue more generally). This particular question is quite a common one that we see. I'd welcome any feedback on this.

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    Imo the post you refer to contains all you need to know. You're not seeding if questions already exist, and you're reposting existing real problems. Do read that one thoroughly, though, including the posts it links to, there are many caveats. – Erik von Asmuth Sep 24 at 13:24
  • Some questions that hit the known and frequently-encountered issues already exist, but one problem is that rewriting them to make them more generally useful would be to turn them into different questions. So, it would be necessary I believe, in most cases at least, to create and answer new ones. – Daniele Procida Sep 24 at 13:27
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    You should ensure that your answers (and questions, likely) are clearly marked as having come from employees of the company that makes the product. That's why there's the bit about spam in that advice. Also, that advice in the help center does mention using the contact us if you have questions about using the site for product support... I would be careful about taking advice from users of the site on Meta; they may not always reflect what the company wants (or even what the consensus of users is). – Heretic Monkey Sep 24 at 13:39
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    is divio on topic still? its a hosting provider? will we get questions that aren't code related? – Daniel A. White Sep 25 at 15:20
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    Stack overflow is a programming related Q/A site, not a product Q/A site. – aaa90210 Sep 27 at 1:17
  • I have added a first attempt at providing one of these question/answer pairs, at stackoverflow.com/questions/52759363/…. I have tried to make the answer as useful as possible (i.e. not just referring to Divio but explaining the Docker issue more generally). This particular question is quite a common one that we see. I'd welcome any feedback on this. Thanks. – Daniele Procida Oct 11 at 11:53
  • write up particular questions as we receive them through our support channels
  • anonymise and generalise them to be as useful as possible
  • frame them as clear, well-formatted SO questions
  • provide them with comprehensive answers

What you've just described is what we call a canonical reference, and such questions are an important tool for tag curation. I'd simply go ahead with these—nobody is going to complain about having some frequently-asked questions to use as dupe-targets, and in fact we generally encourage this sort of thing.

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    Indeed, the key is to make sure the questions are good fits for Stack Overflow, regardless of whether they are product-related seeds or not; if it's a programming question, someone may have it and may come to Stack Overflow organically to ask it. – TylerH Sep 24 at 14:09
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    Actually, in my experience, if you attempt to write a well-written dupe-target question, it often gets closed as a duplicate, pointing to the old and badly written question. Age of a question trumps everything it seems when closing as a duplicate. – Flimm Sep 24 at 15:51
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    @Flimm thing is, a well-written canonical can be used as a dupe-target whether it's closed or not. – Stephen Leppik Sep 24 at 16:00
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    @StephenLeppik Why would you want to use a closed question as a dupe target? It is condemned to be stuck with its answers, nobody is allowed to post a better or more up-to-date answer. – Flimm Sep 24 at 17:13
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    @Flimm If the answers it already has are good enough. – Stephen Leppik Sep 24 at 17:17
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    @Flimm "Age of a question trumps everything it seems when closing as a duplicate" hopefully that won't happen on this case. The best Q&A pair should be used as the dupe target regardless of the age. This is an important aspect because unregistered users will be redirected automatically to the dupe target without seeing the original post. That's also why we can close older questions as a dupe to a newer question. – Andrew T. Sep 25 at 3:28
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    If the new question is closed as a dupe of the older (badly written) question, flag the new one for moderator attention and explain that you'd like the dupe targetting to be flipped. – Draco18s Sep 25 at 4:06
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    @AndrewT. New questions can get closed as duplicates before they have a chance at collecting answers. So if an old rubbish question is constantly used as a dupe target, it becomes impossible for a new Q&A pair to replace it as a dupe target, because new questions get closed as duplicates too fast. Editing the old question often is unacceptable, because it would mean editing out all the detail that the original user meant to include, but that make it a bad canonical question and a bad dupe target. – Flimm Sep 25 at 8:44
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    @AndrewT. Just FYI: I've tried going to duplicates while not logged in. I was not automatically redirected to the duplicate target. I, also, used to be under the impression that users who were not logged in were automatically redirected to the duplicate-target, but that's not what I've experienced (and just re-tested). – Makyen Sep 25 at 9:19
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    @Flimm: That's why if you're writing up a canonical Q&A, you should use the "answer my own question" checkbox to post an already-answered question, instead of wasting anyone's time looking at and trying to answer or deal with just the question, when you're already writing an answer. Then you or someone with a gold badge in the tag can go and close any questions as duplicates of your new one, including the old bad canonical. (Once your Q&A gets an upvote, and you've had time for it to get some feedback and make sure it's actually good.) – Peter Cordes Sep 25 at 9:32
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    @Makyen apparently I had a misunderstanding, but it seems it'd redirect if it's not yet answered, like stackoverflow.com/questions/52039886/… – Andrew T. Sep 25 at 9:34
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    @BillK: It can absolutely be appropriate to close an old question as a dupe of a newer one. The key is the relative quality of the questions and their answers. If they're pretty similar overall, that's when you consider age. Age does not trump quality, though. – Nathan Tuggy Sep 26 at 3:10
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    @Flimm That's no how it's supposed to work. If you ever run across a clear case of a better/canonical question closed as a dupe of a worse one just because the worse one is older, you can come over to the SOCVR chatroom and request help to fix it. – TylerH Sep 26 at 15:33
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    @BillK I'm not sure what you mean by gaming? Each user in the SOCVR acts on their own judgment on voting, just like anyone else. It simply exists to draw additional attention to pressing matters. Also, I'm not sure what you mean by "why would you do it to someone rather than fixing their post". Finally, you seem unaware that this is the policy of the community and moderators and CMs - just because a question is older does not mean it is a better duplicate target. Date shouldn't be the sole reason for flipping a dupe and its target, and being older doesn't trump quality/scope of content. – TylerH Sep 26 at 16:59
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    @BillK You seem pretty new to Meta; spend some time in duplicate-questions to read some of the community's decisions on the matter. – TylerH Sep 26 at 16:59

Overall, this is ok, but keep in mind that self-answered Q&A is kept to the same quality standards as any other post. This means in particular that the question must be narrowed-down & specific, it must stand on its own and it must contain a MCVE if needed etc etc. Also be aware that other users are free to answer the question.

The tag wiki for is, as it currently stands, quite bad. In particular, it needs tag usage guidance. For example how to properly use the tag together with and other relevant tags, how to not use it with if the question is about that, or whatever else is relevant. Before you do anything else, I would suggest that you write up a proper tag wiki.

Look at the guidance carefully:

...we advise against seeding the site with questions about your product. Our community is very sensitive to spam and might see your attempt as such

We advise against it because people might think you've got the wrong intentions. If you 're able to navigate through that successfully by writing great questions with thorough answers and:

  • Don't inadvertently form a voting ring with your co-workers to upvote those posts, let the community do it
  • Indicate that you're with the company, and want to write a comprehensive answer because the topic comes up frequently - that's a big indication that you're attempting to make some sort of knowledge more common by making it more accessible and identifies the canonical
  • Go through the tag(s) and identify exact or possible duplicates, flag / and or / use your votes to help mark them as such
  • Don't set yourselves up as gatekeepers, encourage others to edit the posts, let the commuinity take ownership of them

... you're more than fine. The advice we give came from observing folks trying to 'seed' the site with questions about a product that did not exist prior to their efforts (at all). There was no tag created organically, no real questions about it, nobody was really using it and that's what raised a lot of eyebrows. We advise these people to wait until some questions and a tag appear organically prior to trying to direct programming questions to the site. It just almost always goes bad when people jump the gun.

You've already got questions about the product, all you're doing is jumping in and helping out.

A lot of people have told you that you can do this, and they're certainly right that, if done well, it's allowed. But it is worth noting that most people that try to do this do it poorly, and create problems, for them, and the community, as a result. These are some of the common pitfalls that people fall into when doing this sort of thing (or when posting self-answered questions in general).

  1. They don't ask questions that people actually have.
  2. They ask poorly researched questions, questions that already have readily accessible quality answers to.
  3. They treat the questions as a mere placeholder for an answer. Not actually asking an answerable question, but merely sticking anything in the question so that an answer can be posted. It's important that questions stand on their own as good questions.
  4. Posting an extremely broad question. Sometimes this is because they want to post a novel for an answer (you should break up the information into smaller more focused questions instead), sometimes in their attempts to generalize the question they're actually making it far broader than even their answer covers.
  5. Posting an unclear question. In attempts to generalize a problem, it's easy to remove details needed to actually answer it. Additionally, lots of people end up writing these "backwards", by writing an answer and then writing a question that it answers, Jeopardy style. This makes it easy to leave out information from the question necessary to answer it. It's important that the question actually be answerable, rather than asking an unanswerable question and posting an answer that assumes information not stated in the question.
  6. Posting in bad faith, for the purposes of advertising. Some people out there aren't posting questions to help people solve problems, but to just get people seeing questions about their product. If you're doing this, or even if you're giving people the impression that you're doing this, it'll cause problems. Even if you're not a bad apple, know that there are bad apples out there. It becomes that much more important for you to ask great questions and answers as a result. There will be people that hold you to a higher standard because there are people out there that are doing things like this.

Instead of seeding Stack Overflow it would be great to create support pages on your website to the topics so that your users have the answers before they have a question.

But it is also great to see that you are looking for question on Stack Overflow and answer them. Your users appreciate that.

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    I can see the attraction of keeping support pages on the specific website, but it also seems beneficial to have one place where all answers can be gathered and voted on. For that reason I'd tend to prefer a link on the website to the tag on Stack Overflow, rather than split the data by creating a mini Q&A on the specific website. – trichoplax Sep 27 at 10:10

I'd suggest that as most legitimate option you should try to edit the existing questions with minimal loss of original context so that they do appear higher as relevant search results and add your detailed answer under that question.

Also when you answer, make sure you hit the community wiki checkbox.

Adding new questions should be last resort. Chances are, that if no-one has asked it till now, these are not going to be asked anyway.

And do update the tag wiki.

  • Since there have been a few downvotes without specifying the problem: I strongly disagree with every point except "update the tag wiki". – trichoplax Sep 27 at 10:07

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