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One of the most common problems here is that people will ask a question, sometimes on multiple sites, and vanish without comment as soon as their issue is resolved.

I think behaviour like this could be resolved by improving Stack Overflow's shop front, but there is already What should I do when someone answers my question?.

What can we do about people who do the same thing, but mark a potentially very poor answer as accepted and then disappear without resolving the underlying problem?

This betrays the principle that Stack Overflow is a receptacle for programming questions and definitive answers, but the "it works" measure of quality is becoming too common.

How can we keep our principles and reject poor answers that have been accepted?

It would be simplistic to suggest that those with limited experience may not accept an answer until a day or two have expired, as that would just increase the incidence of orphan questions. But perhaps that's what their fate should be?

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  • How would you consider to reach out to them? Unrequested eMail certainly would violate the GDPR, no? I'd say just DV the answer. Sep 18 '18 at 18:43
  • If they get a great answer right away and have to wait a day or two to accept it what is the chance they actually come back to accept it?
    – Joe W
    Sep 18 '18 at 18:44
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    It happens. You vote on the helpfulness of the answer and move on. Stack Overflow is here for the long game, not that individual question asker.
    – Martijn Pieters Mod
    Sep 18 '18 at 18:50
  • I mean the easiest thing to achieve this would be to devalue the green check mark .. over time another answer can gather more support,but if the OP marked down the first copypasta that fixes his issue and missed the awesome answer that came after.... Well too bad :/ (it wouldn't help people to wait for a bettee answer mind you. But it would make the best answer more visible)
    – Patrice
    Sep 18 '18 at 18:54
  • @Patrice: I agree: the big green tick (American = check) shouldn't feature in the sorting at all. It awards far too much for the "it works" criterion. Our peers should be more empowered, and feel that their opinion counts for something. It's far from uncommon for people to accept an answer, but come back soon afterwards with a copy of that answer asking how to fix it.
    – Borodin
    Sep 18 '18 at 21:15
  • PantaRei: "How would you consider to reach out to them?" I would hope to work within the existing framework that Stack Overflow provides. Suggesting an unsolicited email is foolish, as is your arcane user name.
    – Borodin
    Sep 18 '18 at 21:25
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    If you are a person with an issue and you don't know how to fix it, how are you expected to distinguish empirically between an answer that just works, vs a "great answer". If it fixes your problem, as far as you are aware, then it's a great answer.
    – Taplar
    Sep 18 '18 at 21:27
  • @Taplar: That is precisely my point. Do I really need to explain this? If an answer "works" and you are in desperate need of a fix then you should adopt it immediately. Either way you should wait and read any comments on that answer and compare it with other answers as they appear, selecting what you judge to be the best answer after maybe a day or two. Of course no one will do this, which is why I have asked my question. The big green tick works against the purpose of Stack Overflow: to be a repository of the best answers to programming questions.
    – Borodin
    Sep 18 '18 at 22:05
  • @Taplar: Likewise. Let's say these comments didn't happen.
    – Borodin
    Sep 18 '18 at 22:13
  • @Taplar: Please don't edit your comments after two or three subsequent posts have referred to its contents. Nothing of what you've added couldn't be posted as a separate comment.
    – Borodin
    Sep 18 '18 at 22:15
  • My one edit was made during the time you made your statement after it. If you are referring to me removing the one comment, then I did that under the assumption you were going to remove your one comment, which you did. But again, now we're just getting into a bickering match and detracting from the OP.
    – Taplar
    Sep 18 '18 at 22:16
  • Which that one looks like it was removed. So I will restate it. It is my believe that preventing users from accepting an answer for an extended period of time, would more than likely encourage new users to not accept answers, rather than wait and see all the options and finding the "best" answer, which also typically an opinionated viewpoint.
    – Taplar
    Sep 18 '18 at 22:23
  • @Martijn: "Stack Overflow is here for the long game, not that individual question asker" That was my entire point, and I can't imagine how you think that I disagree. Focussing on the green tick encourages quick fixes at the expense of quality answers. Stack Overflow would be a better place if I felt it was worth examining older posts to see if I could offer a better solution. As it is, everyone watches the most recent questions in the hope that they can be the first to get their answer accepted. None of this aligns with Stack Overflow's stated ambition.
    – Borodin
    Sep 18 '18 at 22:31
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    @Borodin: "Stack Overflow would be a better place if I felt it was worth examining older posts to see if I could offer a better solution." Nobody's stopping you from doing that. Indeed, I have rarely just stopped at the first answer, even when I'm actively looking for the specific answer. "As it is, everyone watches the most recent questions in the hope that they can be the first to get their answer accepted." Do they? I certainly don't. I don't answer to get the answer accepted; I answer to provide an answer. Sep 19 '18 at 0:35
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    @Taplar: "how are you expected to distinguish empirically between an answer that just works, vs a "great answer"." That all rather depends on the apparent quality of the answers in question. It's not hard to differentiate between "here's some code" and "here is the underlying thing you're not understanding that caused the problem". With the exception of answers that are flat-out wrong (as in they don't do what they say they do), it shouldn't be difficult even for a relative novice to determine answer quality. Sep 19 '18 at 0:38
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What can we do about people who do the same thing, but mark a potentially very poor answer as accepted and then disappear without resolving the underlying problem?

Not a whole lot we can do for that individual, but we can upvote the other answers we feel are better.

How can we keep our principles and reject poor answers that have been accepted?

We've never had the power to do anything about poor answers besides up and downvote. In that vein, nothing much has changed, and we would still downvote a poor answer, irrespective of if it's accepted.

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