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MSVC Align variable data on executable file output (< 10K screenshot)

According to the townspeople, this is "unclear what is being asked". I believe the truth actually is "I dont know the answer to the question and this offends me".

No matter what I ask, easy or hard, I always have to go through this. I can make the most exact and minimal question, and the first comment will always be, "Why do you ask this?" "Why would you even seek this answer?" and so on rather than an answer to the question itself.

Of course this is quickly followed by close votes and in an instant the question is killed to make room for the next "how do I insert into a database?".

I almost feel the people here use multiple accounts to vote down faster (is closing questions rewarded? is that the meta? are they site competitors trying to create a negative environment?), because right after the first negative comment will always come 2 to 3 downvotes + mark to close votes as if done by the same person.

It gets so bad that whenever I go answer questions I have to take it upon myself to "save" others questions, beause I'll read them, find them okay, and then read all the negative comments that it receives, same behavior as used against me.

In fact, the successful questions I had also started with downvotes, negative comments, and close votes, and were only saved later by other users.

Something has to be done to fix the behaviors users fall into. Because at the moment I see this like a negative sum, whatever action you take has an expected negative response, and outcome, rather than a positive (answer) or even neutral (no interaction, left unanswered) response.

Personally, I feel questioning the question should be an offense. Since it is the most common behavior that doesnt add anything (because no matter the answer you can always reply with "Why?").

closed as off-topic by πάντα ῥεῖ, Nissa, Code Lღver, il_raffa, Sotirios Delimanolis Sep 13 '18 at 17:31

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to seek input and discussion from the community. If you have encountered a problem on one of our sites, please describe it in detail. See also: What is "meta"? How does it work?" – πάντα ῥεῖ, Nissa, Code Lღver, Sotirios Delimanolis
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 11
    If you keep running into the same issues with your questions, maybe the questions really are the problem, not the other users' behaviour. – user247702 Sep 13 '18 at 16:09
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    It's not unreasonable to ask for more details about unusual requirements. If you want someone to do exactly what you ask of them, you could offer to employ them or enter into a contract. Without such financial consideration, SO volunteers are free to enquire about your end use requirement, after all, it may be inappropriate, pointless, unworkable, easy-to-avoid. confidential, closed-source or even immoral/illegal. – Martin James Sep 13 '18 at 16:11
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    Yes, tagging a [visual-c++] [windows] question with [c++] is a bad idea. It didn't used to be that way, but the swords got sharpened. Complaining about it isn't going to fix anything, just use the right tags. – Hans Passant Sep 13 '18 at 16:16
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    "Personally, I feel questioning the question should be an offense" -- If asking for clarification of questions offends you, then you may not have a good experience asking questions on this site since asking questions about questions is common, is expected behavior, and in general is well tolerated by most. If this is a barrier that you don't feel you can surmount, then the best way to get help without this sort of offense is to pay for it. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 13 '18 at 16:20
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    To any potential close voters - um...can we not? It's fine for someone to be upset about their question being closed. It's fine for someone to not know how to best vent that frustration. Let's keep our wits and calm about us and deal with this through answers instead. – Makoto Sep 13 '18 at 16:20
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    I'm a C++ user and my reaction after reading the question is, "Whaaat?!?! This question makes absolutely no sense". I had to re-read it 3 more times with different perspectives before I finally understood what you were really asking. Despite there being a real question underneath, I have to agree with everyone else that the question is very unclear as written. Just because I was able to decipher it after multiple attempts doesn't mean others (even experts in the field) will - let alone put that much effort into it. – Mysticial Sep 13 '18 at 16:29
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    @Makoto Probably not much of a point now due to the meta effect. The OP wants to know if (s)he can scan a C++ binary byte-by-byte to find strings in the original code. Then the OP jumps into alignment issues as a possible reason for why it wouldn't work. So right there you have an XY problem. The rest of it is just confusion about how to "fix" it probably as a form of obfuscation or something. – Mysticial Sep 13 '18 at 16:37
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    @rene please click your rep/achievements icon – TylerH Sep 13 '18 at 16:41
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    @Makoto continuing... To add to that, it doesn't help that the usual C++ pedantry kicks in which rubs the OP the wrong way sending him/her into full troll mode leading to this meta post. The whole thing really could've been avoided if the OP stated at the very beginning that this was about finding strings in a binary and for what purpose. – Mysticial Sep 13 '18 at 16:43
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    @MartinJames Which is why I'm strongly suspecting that this is one of those reverse-engineering or obfuscation/licensing related questions. That was the perspective I had to use before I was able to figure out what the question is about and why it was written in such a way. – Mysticial Sep 13 '18 at 16:47
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    @gia Questions of this nature are baiting for people to ask why. So you will need to state your intention and what you are really trying to accomplish. Nobody is going answer a question that reaps of hidden motives. If you cannot state the intention, it's usually because: 1) The OP is trying to do something shady and potentially illegal. In which case, the OP gets what they deserve in terms of treatment. 2) The OP is in a legal situation involving licensing and they are under some sort of NDA requiring them to hide their intentions. Or 3) the OP is just really bad at communicating. – Mysticial Sep 13 '18 at 17:04
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    Gia, if that assumption is incorrect, it should be easy for you to deny it by explaining yourself and your requirement, no? If all you do is raise your hands and go 'I am not shady, everyone else is!'.... You know it just makes you look even more shady? No one said Stack is an easy platform to leverage. But if you go with the flow,listen to comments, answer them/edit your posts in accordance to the guidance, you get a far better reception than if you suppose everyone is out to get you :/. You really want help? Then why are you fighting back the very platform&community where you seek it? – Patrice Sep 13 '18 at 17:43
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    Not receiving anything? Getting your question clearer, thus reopened, thus in a better spot to be answered, isn't worth it? By the way I come in here to genuinely try to help you. Don't appreciate being called a troll. You prove once again that people don't really want to use Stack the right way, they just want their answers. Doing that tends to lead to extremely negative experiences...(by the way, what is 'what I want'? Cause from where I am sitting it seems I simply advocate for clear and complete questions ..) – Patrice Sep 13 '18 at 18:07
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    Do you want help, or do you want to rant? You can't do both. The former requires some personal responsibility, and acknowledging that you might have it wrong. The latter, doesn't, is easier, feels good, and does nothing to actually get your question answered. Most new users choose the latter. Vanishingly few choose the former, as it requires effort on their part. They, however, will get a better reception. – fbueckert Sep 13 '18 at 18:07
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    (cont) again. A ban lets you post once every 6 months. If you don't want to fix this very post, see my feedback as guidance for that question you'll get in half a year . – Patrice Sep 13 '18 at 18:25
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Looking at the question, it doesn't seem like you've demonstrated that your question is tied to a specific use case. That is to say, it is very unclear as to why this particular artifact matters.

The commentators on your question were trying to tease this out of you but couldn't make much headway since you didn't really give them much to work with.

enter image description here

I don't really understand C++ much so I would not be able to actually answer your question, but it's confusing to me why this matters in the context of an executable.

It would be in your best interests to clarify what it is you're actually after. Explain why this is important or significant to your problem domain. Everyone has a unique problem domain and that's perfectly fine, but giving us more context into your domain can only help.

What is not acceptable here is that you've resorted to ad-hominem attacks against people who have voted your question down, which is not only unconstructive, but pointless. We really don't have a vendetta against anyone when we're voting on questions; we just want to see good, on-topic questions. A question which lacks clarity isn't one I would upvote because I can't objectively call a question "good" if it's unclear to me.

  • Previous experience, answering why? questions lead to why would you do that? and more whys, followed by no, I do not support this use case, therefore its solution is wrong, and only get questions closed faster. Extremely apparent when trying to solve dangerous (for this site) topics like obfuscation. You are only not penalized when solving cookie cutter use cases, then again those have to face duplicate or homework challenges. I've asked how to read 50 million integers the fastest in given language, extremely direct and clear, downvoted asap as well. Expected interaction is negative. – gia Sep 13 '18 at 16:23
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    @Gia Just to provide a relevant quote to supplement Makoto's focus on making the question actually matter, in the guide to on topic questions, it specifies "a practical, answerable problem that is unique to software development" Source. When we say we want it to be "clear as to why this particular artifact matters," it's because that's part of our requirements for questions. – Davy M Sep 13 '18 at 16:23
  • This happens because the more information you give, the more topics you provide your will-be downvoters to disagree with you. And, as soon as a single point of disagreement is reached, the natural behavior is to downvote. – gia Sep 13 '18 at 16:25
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    @gia: I've written answers for Java 1.2. While I do make it very explicit that I don't support their use case, I don't deny them an answer because they demonstrated that they had a practical and reasonable problem. People not supporting a use case is not congruent with people not understanding your question. – Makoto Sep 13 '18 at 16:26
  • I dont see the requirement to explain the use case in this case truthfully, if you want to read a text file you open it and scan its contents, and you ask about it, dont need to explain further, this is a question about the msvc exe file format and whatever flags could modify it. It doesnt help the first reply attacked the question for being about ISO C++ despite the title, tag and body named MSVC. I had previous negative bias however, whch is what I complain about on the question, tha the site meta creates negative bias towards it, so thats why I refused to explain a use case. – gia Sep 13 '18 at 16:36
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    I suppose there's not much we can really do then. Sorry it didn't work out the way you had intended. I hope in the future that when you do ask a question, you won't feel as apprehensive about replying to requests for a use case. – Makoto Sep 13 '18 at 16:40
  • You can modify the site rules so it doesnt create negative bias actually, and by you I mean whoever has that authority. – gia Sep 13 '18 at 16:58
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    I haven't illustrated any bias whatsoever in this conversation. Hopefully you'll come to understand that there hasn't been any bias towards your question during this entire process. – Makoto Sep 13 '18 at 16:59
  • thats not what I said – gia Sep 13 '18 at 17:02
  • @Makoto: I agree to leave the question open, but only until we see where we're headed. If we have a poster who is willing to both give and take, then it was worth it. If we run into someone only looking to pick a fight, then the question should be closed and deleted. Nothing to see here. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 13 '18 at 18:48
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According to the townspeople, this is "unclear what is being asked". I believe the truth actually is "I dont know the answer to the question and this offends me".

Making assumptions about why other people do something is dangerous as the person making assumptions is usually wrong, especially considering the person making the assumptions in this case is doing so from the position of needing help/assistance from others. Here on Stack Overflow, you (and everyone else) are asked to assume good faith, which means you should assume people asking "why" or voting to close are doing so for a good reason.

I strongly recommend engaging with the people on the site especially if they are interacting with your question in a way that is not an answer. Actions are signals, and if someone is acting on your question via a comment or an edit or a vote, that means that they likely do not find your question answerable in its current state. This could be because they don't know the answer, or more likely the question is unclear, incomplete, already been asked, or something else, and they are wanting to know more information before making the decision to answer or close or walk away.

No matter what I ask, easy or hard, I always have to go through this. I can make the most exact and minimal question, and the first comment will always be, "Why do you ask this?" "Why would you even seek this answer?" and so on rather than an answer to the question itself.

Of course this is quickly followed by close votes and in an instant the question is killed to make room for the next "how do I insert into a database?".

Looking at the six questions you have asked on the site, we can see this is not true. Of those six questions, only one other one (from September 1st) has seen a comment asking why you are trying to do something. Likewise, none of the other questions you've asked (at least that aren't deleted) have been closed.

I do see, however, a trend of people asking you to provide more information or code that you've already tried. I would recommend future questions try to anticipate these repetitive requests by including an MCVE from the get-go as well as the reasoning for why you are trying to do what you are doing.

I almost feel the people here use multiple accounts to vote down faster (is closing questions rewarded? is that the meta? are they site competitors trying to create a negative environment?), because right after the first negative comment will always come 2 to 3 downvotes + mark to close votes as if done by the same person.

No, there is no such competition to create a negative environment and anyone using multiple accounts to circumvent the rules of the site in this way should be punished accordingly. To that end, if you have any evidence that this is happening, please flag their posts (or your own) for moderator attention so that it can be investigated by the people with the tools and the authority to do so.

In fact, the successful questions I had also started with downvotes, negative comments, and close votes, and were only saved later by non troll/idiot users.

While it's unfortunate that you've had a negative experience, it's rude of you to call users engaging earnestly with you trolls, and it's rude to call anyone an idiot. Rude behavior is against the site's Code of Conduct, and you may find yourself in trouble here if you call people idiots.

Something has to be done to fix the behaviors users fall into. Because at the moment I see this like a negative sum, whatever action you take has an expected negative response, and outcome, rather than a positive (answer) or even neutral (no interaction, left unanswered) response.

I agree that negative responses are bad for the site. Not to put too fine a point on it, but my impression from this post and from the comments under your non-deleted questions is that your response here on Meta is far more negative than any of the responses your questions have received.

Personally, I feel questioning the question should be an offense. Since it is the most common behavior that doesnt add anything (because no matter the answer you can always reply with "Why?").

This is misguided thinking on your part. For starters, we expect mature discourse here, so if someone ever does respond to everything you say with "Why", please report that kind of petulance to a moderator. However, I haven't seen that anywhere, let alone in your posts. Secondly, if you ask a question here, and someone responds with another question, they are almost always asking for clarification because they don't understand your question. They may also have experience in what you're asking and know that you are suffering from an XY problem or that your question may already have a solution somewhere... in which case clarification may remove any such doubt in their mind.

The key thing to keep in mind here is that people are here to help you. Sometimes that means giving you an answer. Sometimes it means asking you questions so that you can better explain what you are trying to accomplish or why. In some cases they may even be helping you solve your own problem by better explaining it (read: rubber duck debugging).

  • Well, clearly the questions that are open have not been closed... As I stated those were downvoted at first until they did survive and got to live, apparently, but they walked the plank as the others, i usually flag plain why questions for deletion, so thats why you dont find them, probably (I mean a why question on an specific point could be ok, but if you ask why do you ask this question?, then you signal me that you dont know the answer nor are interested on the question, just want a reason to close it). – gia Sep 13 '18 at 16:50
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    @gia I honestly cannot fathom what makes you think "why are you asking this" means the person is not interested. In fact it means the exact opposite. If I ask why someone does something, it means I am interested and want to know more. Holding the position that "why" means "I am not interested" is frankly indefensible. If you don't want people to engage with you and provide assistance or teach you how to do something, what's the real point in posting a question here in the first place? – TylerH Sep 13 '18 at 17:02

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