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I've received a question ban on Stack Overflow, to which I am required to

edit all of [my] questions...especially those with a score of 0 or less

for a lift. 'Usefulness' is cited as the main reason.

I don't see how upvotes are used as a metric for 'usefulness'. If so, then I turn it back to Stack Overflow by pointing that many of my questions have received answers with a good share of upvotes. Clearly, then, the topic I've raised was of interest to the community.

Take these questions as an example:

(1) - zero upvotes, answer has two
(2) - zero upvotes, I answer my own question in full detail, zero answer upvotes
(3) - three downvotes, answer has three upvotes

These questions, along all of my other zero upvote questions, clearly present the problem and an attempted solution - often in detail. What, exactly, is it that Stack Overflow wishes me to 'edit' in these questions?

EDIT:

I've read over the responses - thanks for your input. Point out some of the specific flaws as you may, I don't deem the quality or usefulness of my questions to be net-negative, even by Stack Overflow standards. All of my questions clearly present the problem, and the majority include a full attempted solution (while I may link the full code in Fiddle, I do so to omit parts that only add to question length - but am sure to include the essentials).

(2), for example, presents the problem with all relevant information, and includes my own complete solution - yet both the question and the solution have zero upvotes. What edit could I possibly make to (2) to make a real difference?

Upvotes are indicative of popular interest more than they are of quality of inquiry. If I am expected to edit my questions for the sole sake of upvotes, when many have already been answered and aren't likely to be viewed or voted on further, or improved with edits even if - it is an unfair and oversimplified system which should be reconsidered.

A question ban of this kind, without a reasonable means of resolution, will only encourage users like me to make new accounts - nothing more.

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    Instead of JsFiddle you can edit in a Stack Snippet: stackoverflow.com/q/51942158/578411 – rene Sep 9 '18 at 19:03
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    Personally I would remove the Help is appreciated. It is not needed. By posting you already indicate that you appreciate help and you can show your appreciation with an upvote or an accept mark. – rene Sep 9 '18 at 19:08
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    The what performance is better is a question that is often asked but doomed to receive lots of downvotes. You are the only one who can answer the question by measuring it on your own box. Once you have those results you can ask a question how to improve one approach to reach a deterministic goal. Something like: this code loads in 250ms on my box, but I need it to run within 100ms. I tried fubar but that only made it worse by 10 percent. How can I reach that 100ms performance?. – rene Sep 9 '18 at 19:13
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    2: you didn't include an MCVE, and we don't need a full background of what you're doing. We need a clear problem statement, example input, expected output, actual output, and a minimal complete and verifiable example that reproduces the issue. You've left the most important part off site, then neglected most of the rest, while including a bunch of irrelevant noise. – user4639281 Sep 9 '18 at 19:17
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    I'd be surprised if 0-score questions contribute to a ban. I'm guessing you have some deleted questions (those count too). Although improving your 0-score questions may get you some upvotes, which can remove the ban. – Bernhard Barker Sep 9 '18 at 19:42
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    "A question ban of this kind, without a reasonable means of resolution, will only encourage users like me to make new accounts - nothing more." -- whoa, you know of course that this site is managed by folks who are expert at programming, internet, and such, and that they have seen this sort of behavior often, have bots that look for it, and then when this happens, the original poster is often given a permanent ban, including a ban on making new user accounts (yes, they know how to do this). Please think twice before doing this, if only for your own good. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 9 '18 at 22:23
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    Also you state "without a reasonable means of resolution..." -- I believe that you should have received warning that you were at risk of the question ban before it occurred, and in fact, as I understand it, a ban cannot occur without first having received this. So the means were there before you received the ban. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 9 '18 at 22:28
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    Deleted questions, score < 0: (1 2 3) that are also contributing to the post ban. – Samuel Liew Sep 9 '18 at 23:46
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    Here's an example of how to respond well to question bans. I understand it takes a thick skin to do this. – Super Jade Sep 10 '18 at 4:10
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    "Point out some of the specific flaws as you may, I don't deem the quality or usefulness of my questions to be net-negative, even by Stack Overflow standards." rougly translate to "So thanks for your valid input, but I really couldn't care less, I reject all of it because I know more than you what Stack Overflow is." Well, ok then, have nice day. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Sep 10 '18 at 13:02
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    Can it be done? I'm willing to learn a programming language/web design if necessary (C++, HTML, etc). and then you wonder what is too broad about your inquiry? You don't think learning a programming language (C++?) and coding a parser for both PDF and OpenXML documents as well as the HTML renderer is a lot to ask for? – rene Sep 10 '18 at 13:46
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Clearly, then, the topic I've raised was of interest to the community.

Not necessarily. People can upvote answers for whatever reason they want. The answer may have been upvoted just because it is a good answer, even if the topic is not interesting to anyone. Should people vote this way? Maybe not, but they can.

And even if your question is interesting, people may refrain from upvoting or even downright downvoting because the question has low quality.

I would guess that it is pretty common to downvote questions about comparing the speed of two methods for the sole reason that it is often very easy to test it yourself. And even when it isn't easy, it is the only way to really find out because we are not able to run the code on the computer you will run it on. Performance depends on many factors.

What, exactly, is it that Stack Overflow wishes me to 'edit' in these questions?

I would recommend reading these: https://stackoverflow.com/help/asking

There you can find many things that is good to think about. I would also recommend reading http://idownvotedbecau.se/ . I know that it has a bit of a non-friendly url, but nevertheless, it contains very much information about why people downvote. I took a quick look at your questions and got the impression that you don't know about the concept of MCVE. You can read about this on both SO and idownvotedbecau.se

Lastly, this guide about how to ask smart questions is awesome. Not only does it really help developing good habits when it comes to seeking help on forums. It does also give a very good explanation about why help forums can seem a bit hostile sometimes. Long reading, but good. http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

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Upvotes are indicative of popular interest more than they are of quality of inquiry.

Says who? You seem to be confusing other popular social medias, like Reddit or Imgur, to Stack Overflow. There is an extremely large and knowledgeable community of people that look at posts here, and suggesting that they're not voting based on an actual understanding of the posts is... extremely pretentious.

Downvotes are only negative in the numerical sense of "negative", in the same way that minus one is negative. When seeing algebra like y = 3x - 4 does one deem the - 4 to be mean in the same way one considers downvotes to be?

Clearly, then, the topic I've raised was of interest to the community.

The active community of Stack Overflow is composed of hundreds of thousands of developpers, across countries, personal identification, age, experience... deeming a topic to "clearly be of interest" to all of this community based on three upvotes is very much over-simplistic.

A question ban of this kind, without a reasonable means of resolution [...]

It is quite reasonable to expect someone to improve the quality of their contribution, evaluated by the voting of other people versed in the topics, before making new ones.

[...] will only encourage users like me to make new accounts - nothing more.

Totally not, actually! There has been much more question about people reasonably asking how to improve their questions lately on meta, and they've been received very well, often resulting in them being raised out of their bans!

A notable difference however: they were holding up to their actions and taking responsibility for their content instead of invoking some kind of generalized bad system and deciding themselves more understanding of Stack Overflow than everyone else.

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I don't see how upvotes are used as a metric for 'usefulness.'

It's just what an up vote on a post means. For questions it means that it's on-topic, well asked, and likely to be helpful to other visitors. The tooltip for the up arrow is:

This question shows research effort; it is useful and clear.

So up votes on answers don't help your questions. For example, someone could manage to write a good answer to what other users considered an unclear question.

What, exactly, is it that Stack Overflow wishes me to 'edit' in these questions?

Some things I noticed looking at a few of your questions:

  • You don't always put your full code example on the site, instead using JSFiddle links for enough code to demonstrate your issue. Remember that you must have enough code to reproduce your problem in the question yourself. You can also have fiddle links but your question should be complete even if all 3rd party links fail.

  • A couple of times other users complained that you expanded the scope of your question after the fact. You know not to do this now but it might explain why you didn't get up votes on those questions at the time.

  • Remember that alt text is for users who can't see your images so the alt text needs to convey the pertinent information from the image they can't see. When the image is already described by the text around it, just leave the image description blank.

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  • May I recommend to use bold for the "it is useful" part of the tooltip quote? – Yunnosch Sep 10 '18 at 6:43
  • @Yunnosch Well, I should have used quote formatting for it so I can fix that – BSMP Sep 10 '18 at 13:40
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It looks like some people came by and upvoted OP's questions. I didn't vote at all but some questions were really bad and the "fix" instructions were disengenuous. The "innerHTML" question is terrible for it's content. The latex HTML padding question is going to attract downvotes due to asking in images but that question needs to. It can be improved by describing conversation tool better.

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