101

Situation

For several days, many posts on Meta.SO have been edited by the same user, mostly replacing "StackOverflow" with "Stack Overflow" and editing tags. A large number of these questions are old, outdated, sometimes closed or resolved. Some examples:

  • A question about the search for a Spanish speaking community manager (2015, no longer valid),
  • An issue with transparency on the SO icon (2015?, no longer valid),
  • A completed burnination request from 2017
  • Feature requests for Documentation (for sure not valid anymore)

The edits on their own aren't exactly bad, it is just the amount of them that makes them questionable. At the time of writing, we are talking of ~250 edits in 3.5 days.

Problem

I see two problems here:

  1. It clutters the active questions page. For the last three days, these edits have been responsible for 60-70% of all active questions.
  2. There is no communication about what is going on. It seems that there has never been any information what is planned, nor has it been possible to find out why these edits are being done. It seems that the user is trying to get rid of a lot of tags, because most of the tags removed are only used in a few questions.

I know that the burnination process has exceptions for tags with only a handful of questions and that they can be removed without the full process. But, in my opinion, this does not apply when removing a large number of such tags. If there is a bigger cleanup ongoing, then it should be discussed first, coordinated and done in a rush instead of flooding meta with all these edits over days.

Why a Meta question?

Discussing this in this form was the last thing I wanted to do. But everything else didn't work.

First, I commented on a edited post to ask the editor what his plans are - No response. A day later I again left a comment on a post - Again no response. Then I flagged for moderator attention, the flag has now been pending for 2.5 days and the edits are still flooding in.

Yesterday, the user asked a question (a tag renaming that is related to the edits). I left a comment asking again what they planned and asked them to please respond. The user didn't respond and deleted the question after a moderator renamed the tag.

What irritates me most is that the user completely refuses any communication or discussion of his actions. There is no way he could have missed the last comment since he deleted the question afterwards. It is also not the first incident with this user and also, the last time, they didn't ever respond to any comments. I also find it very suboptimal that moderators are not responding but are willing to handle his renaming requests.

Question

How should this be handled? Is it OK for a single user to do such mass edits single-handedly? Does it really make sense to edit old, abandoned questions that have absolutely no relevance anymore and push them to the front-page?

How should such things be reported when moderator flags are not handled?

Edit:

  • Five months after this question was originally posted, the user in question has begun another wave of similar edits, so this is now a recurring issue.
  • February 2019: We are again up to 33 irrelevant edits in the last 18h. The newest filter is filled with > 50% edits by this user again. I also want to add that the same user seems to be doing a mass-removal of the tag on the main site at the same time (48 edits in the last day). If there is a corresponding burnination request for this, I wasn't able to find it.
  • 35
    I didn't mind at first, but the user keeps editing old questions and it's starting to annoy me too now. – Stijn Aug 27 '18 at 8:00
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    While I too I find this flood of nearly irrelevant (but not really bad) edits bothersome, 2.5 days to respond to a flag such like this in meta might not bee all that long. I have had custom-mod flags waiting for longer for posts in main. – yivi Aug 27 '18 at 8:01
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    @yivi: If the flag is about a single incident where it makes no difference if it's handled now or in a day it's fine to take some time. But not for a flag like this were the situation gets worse with every day they wait. Unfortunately, there is no stronger flag a user could send to the mods to inform them about such flags. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 8:03
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    There is also the matter that while this might be annoying (and it is annoying), it is not really wrong per se and we have no rule against it. So I can understand no mod rushing to handle it. – yivi Aug 27 '18 at 8:15
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    @user000001 I left a comment on their last edit to inform them about this discussion, but yeah, that might be a problem :) – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 8:23
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    This is the same user who flooded the system with questions about synonyms for plurals a few days ago. – greg-449 Aug 27 '18 at 8:30
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    Glad you asked this. I've noticed it also and it's concerning. – Yvette Colomb Aug 27 '18 at 10:06
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    @rene A proper burnination starts with a request on meta. meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/356963. Therefore a proper burnination was not taking place, in any case, even if they had added extra close votes. – Bhargav Rao Aug 27 '18 at 10:34
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    @Ivar: Yeah, that's what I also had in mind. But should this rule also apply when you are going to burnate 50 such tags in a row? Also note that the burnation process adds more details: "If you have authoritative knowledge of all technologies relevant to the tag, have conferred with at least one other trusted community member, and are dealing with a tag that has a small number of questions (< 50), then you can go ahead and remove it yourself or with a little ad hoc help." – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 12:22
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    The burnination process as described was never meant to be applied to tags on Meta. I assumed we could manage those without too much guidance. Specially because SOCVR is mentioned there as well and that room doesn't moderate Meta by definition – rene Aug 27 '18 at 13:04
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    The person who did the edits, also on one of my questions, had replied here but then chose to delete his answer. for those with not enough rep to see it i.imgur.com/IbnSpCS.jpg – Tschallacka Aug 27 '18 at 13:12
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    @Lundin: That's exactly what I did. The flag is still pending since 3 days. In the time between flagging and asking the question another 150 edits had been made. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 15:18
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    @BhargavRao does that mean I have to write an answer to support my point? The voting on the question isn't enough? – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 16:50
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    @Makoto: I think that if there is a decision to replace StackOverflow everywhere with Stack Overflow, then asking a developer to run a script would be a more productive way. – BDL Jan 31 at 20:16
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    For those playing along at home, I got the following response to my mod flag: "The issue was that the user was doing them en masse and flooding the main page. Now they seem to have restricted themselves to 1 edit for a couple of hrs, which the answer there seems to be ok with". It's my personal feeling that they're still doing this at a rate which is causing negative impact to the front page which far outweighs the negligible benefit of these edits. – Sam Hanley Jan 31 at 23:41
49

It is entirely possible to do something that's legit and benign on its own, but to take it to a point where it's no longer good because of the generated side effects.

In this case, the extremely high volume of edits in very old and no longer relevant posts make the meta home page almost useless, since genuine, organic activity is getting obscured by these not bad, but certainly not very useful edits.

While these edits are not detrimental for the posts on their own, it could be argued that the behavior is detrimental to the working of the meta home page, because of the low volume of questions/activity meta has.

The same kind of behavior in main would be arguably be fine, as only the good side-effects would be noticeable, if at all.

To make matters worse, in this case the user has decided to disregard completely the community input on their actions, despite repeated attempts to communicate with them.

Acting more constructively, the user making the edits could have created a meta post to start up an organized effort to perform these edits in a non-disruptive manner (or a less disruptive manner at least). But in another answer to this question they have expressed doubts and reservations about that course of action.

Or just simply to take it easier, and reduce the sheer volume of edits so to a more manageable level. How much should they reduce it? I don't know, this is like having an argument with a neighbour about music volume: It should be low enough so it doesn't disturb the rest of the commuinity.

If enough users consider this an annoying behavior, and the user is not amenable to making changes on their behavior, and allowing that the community have no other tools or mechanism to act on it; I guess the only recourse would be to appeal for a diamond mod to take some action, since this a exceptional pattern that should probably be handled at some level.

  • 2
    "The same kind of behavior in main would be perfectly fine" - unless the edits are focused in specific low-volume tags, in which case the problem is similar. – Dukeling Aug 28 '18 at 20:08
  • For what it's worth, it probably would've been less disruptive try to focus all the edits to a few hours (possibly getting a bunch of people to help with that). That would wreck the front page, but at least the disruption would be much shorter for the same benefit. – Dukeling Aug 28 '18 at 20:13
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    @Cerbrus Maybe we should all do it to flood the site and force SE's hand on actually addressing the fact that "minor" edits still bump questions, a ridiculous issue that's been used as an argument to squash actual improvements to posts for at least 5 years. – jpmc26 Aug 28 '18 at 20:39
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    "The same kind of behavior in main would be perfectly fine" I disagree with that. I see such irrelevant edits of old posts regularly on main, they serve no purpose but irritating other users. – Marc Glisse Aug 29 '18 at 6:48
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    @Marc we are talking about edits that are ok on their own. That are actually improving a post. Those are not irrelevant, unless done to a post that needs to be otherwise closed/deleted. – yivi Aug 29 '18 at 6:57
33

This isn't going to be a popular answer, but...

As long as the edits were tactful and were not egregious (e.g. burninating tags en masse), then...there's not much else to do about it.

Yes, I've noticed these discussions prop up from '15 and older about what to do in certain Meta situations, and I do admit that it's kind of annoyed me. But since we actively reward users for editing old posts... we're kind of stuck there.

I don't deny it would've been nice to see what's going on with the tag editing - that is, post a burnination request, even for Meta, since one-man burnination is very, very much frowned upon. But active editing and removing typos...not sure I see that much of an issue.

  • 8
    We love to make mountains out of molehills, what's wrong with that? We like seeing mountains. – Braiam Aug 27 '18 at 14:59
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    Kinda sucks to see mountains when you're trying to build a train, @Braiam. – Makoto Aug 27 '18 at 15:00
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    I don't think the edits itself are a problem. I think most of them are perfectly fine. It's just about the number of them and the lack of communication. We (at least to my knowledge) have no rules on how much is too much. Maybe it's time for one. Or for the rule there is no too much. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 15:03
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    I like good challenges, not stupid challenges. We don't have to pontificate all the time, do we @Braiam? – Makoto Aug 27 '18 at 15:03
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    @BDL: I don't believe there's a reasonable limit unless a moderator decides to get involved. This is their domain more than it is ours. I do fully agree that the volume of edits were very noisy, but as long as the quality didn't suffer for it... – Makoto Aug 27 '18 at 15:04
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    Yes, but being annoyed by someone's actions doesn't make that person's actions suddenly forbidden @PetterFriberg. It seems to me that the meta discussion which has spawned as a result of this is the natural flow of things; we get a chance to discuss what we think about this change, and the person who did it gets a chance to defend their changes. – Makoto Aug 27 '18 at 15:34
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    In principle I agree with you. But I have to say that this users persistance on the face of this discussion, disregarding completely the community's input, it is making it harder for me to defend their behavior. – yivi Aug 27 '18 at 15:39
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    @Makoto I agree not forbidden, my comment was related to that for future reference I'm missing this part in your answer. You annoy people, why do you annoy people?, what should you do to avoid this? I presume good intention and users normally do not like to annoy but instead they like just to improve the Q/A. – Petter Friberg Aug 27 '18 at 15:46
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    My point @petter. It seems that an action is annoying people, but I've not seen anything but "user is making too many edits" as what is annoying. I don't care how many edits do you make, nor how much time you invest to do it, so long as they are improving the post. I've not seen any case in this discussion where the edits are detrimental.. – Braiam Aug 27 '18 at 15:59
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    @Braiam they are detrimental to the active questions tab, because it's full of old posts resurrected by this edit spree. This might be acceptable for a day or two, but surely not if it goes on for longer. IMO the value of many of these edits doesn't justify this disruption. – snakecharmerb Aug 27 '18 at 16:09
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    @Makoto My point was that the volume of the edits, and their visibility, are detrimental to other users of the site, and that right now it isn't obvious when this spree will end. In themselves the edits aren't detrimental, but I would question whether edits like this one are really worthwhile. But hey, I'm only noticing because it's a holiday here so I'm not at work :-) – snakecharmerb Aug 27 '18 at 16:22
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    @Braiam: I hope you're not suggesting that it's OK to ruin the main landing page simply because there's a similar alternative page. – Nicol Bolas Aug 27 '18 at 16:58
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    @NicolBolas well, I'm suggesting that if you don't like seeing mountains, just go to the beach. – Braiam Aug 27 '18 at 18:12
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    @Braiam No, you're saying that if someone doesn't like seeing toxic waste dumped all over the mountains they should go to the beach, instead of stopping toxic waste from being dumped all over the mountains. Sorry, but some people like seeing mountains that aren't full of other people's trash, and just telling them to leave doesn't fix the problem. – Servy Aug 28 '18 at 0:50
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    @Braiam If someone wants to go through a bunch of questions without any recent activity they can. Nothing was stopping you from looking through a bunch of old questions with small tags on them even with no one making edits. But the edits were stopping people from actually seeing the activity on posts, which is the actual purpose of the activity view, and a thing lots of people do frequently. – Servy Aug 28 '18 at 13:22
17

General

Good edits that improve the post are something we should definitely encourage. But whenever you're going to mass-edit posts, the situation looks a bit different because you're going to annoy other people on the site. Even edits that are on its own perfectly fine can be a problem when beeing done in masses. Imho, all mass-edit operations should be planned and discussed beforehand, it should be clear what the goal is and how many edits will be involved.

What to do before mass editing posts

  1. Decide if the benefits gained from the edits is large enough to warrant the amount of work/the amount of disturbance you are going to cause. A lot of factors play a role here. For example, How old are the posts you're going to edit, How relevant are these posts as of today. Also the percentage of questions in that area/tag/site have to be taken into account. Editing 25 questions in a tag with hundreds of questions a day causes less disturbance than editing 25 questions in a tag with 5 questions a day.

  2. If you decided that the edits are warranted, make a plan. This means write a meta post that explains at least:

    • What you want to edit
    • Why you think the edits are needed
    • Which questions are involved (and how many of them)
  3. Wait until a consensus is reached.

This process has several advantages

  • It stop bad editing actions before they happen.
  • It makes it easy for other people to understand your motivation.
  • Having a plan also allows other users to participate in editing. While that will increase the number of edits at any one time, it will reduce the time-period over which the active page is disrupted. For example, if there are 250 edits that need to be made, and any user is only going to do 50 edits in a day before they get tired and stop, then 5 users can do the edits in one day, which only disrupts the active page that day. If one user is doing the edits, then it takes 5 days, with the active page disrupted on all five days. (thanks to Makyen)
  • With a plan that explains when the disturbance ends, a lot of users will react more relaxed to the edits.

Please note, that tag burninations have their own process which should strictly be followed.

Which amount of questions can I edit without following the process?

That's hard to answer. It's too much if you annoyed more people than you helped with the edits. It will definitely be a case-by-case decision that has to be made by moderators. But I'd say if you do five edits in a row you won't need a plan. If you do 50 edits, you should have a plan. The limit will be somewhere in between.

If you start doing mass-edits (with or without plan), be prepared to answer comments asking you why you edit. In case you already have a meta post, simply linking to this should be enough. Otherwise you should definitely be prepared to explain yourself. Never ignore people asking you for your motivation/reasoning.

What happens if you don't follow the process?

Since it's often a case-by-case decision on how much is too much, there shouldn't be any hard penalties. When it happens, a moderator should at first tell the user to stop with this edits and to propose a plan.

When the user doesn't stop/ignores the moderator message, they should be banned from doing any further edits.

  • 4
    Having a plan also allows other users to participate in editing. While that will increase the number of edits at any one time, it will reduce the time-period over which the active page is disrupted. For example, if there are 250 edits that need to be made, and any user is only going to do 50 edits in a day before they get tired and stop, then 5 users can do the edits in one day, which only disrupts the active page that day. If one user is doing the edits, then it takes 5 days, with the active page disrupted on all five days. – Makyen Aug 27 '18 at 17:50
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    @Makyen: Great addition, I'll add it to the answer. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 17:50
6

I see two problems here:

  1. It clutters the active questions page. For the last three days, these edits have been responsible for 60-70% of all active questions.
  2. There is no communication about what is going on. It seems that there has never been any information what is planned, nor has it been possible to find out why these edits are being done. It seems that the user is trying to get rid of a lot of tags, because most of the tags removed are only used in a few questions.

To 1. see also "Remember that bouncing something on to the main page also removes posts off the main page, which were worthy to be seen by more people and therefore reduces the time which they rightfully had to get." (Bhargav Rao)

Possible solutions include:

  • Forbid extensive trivial edits (on older questions)
  • Rate limit edits (say at most 10 per day per user)
  • Redesign the active questions page to make it differentiating between substantial activity (new answers, substantial edits) and trivial edits; make it ignoring trivial edits

If possible I would prefer the last option but the others are also fine.

To 2. The goal seems to be pretty obvious to me. The user tries to "clean up" for some specific interpretation of cleaning up including the removal of some rarely used tags.

If all the edits are okay by themselves I would actually not require any before-hand communication. However, they aren't. Some of the edits are not okay. Tag removals must be discussed and documented on Meta This hasn't been done and the user must be reminded of that and his edits removing tags must be reverted and the user must be warned to discuss the tag removals on meta before next time.

How should this be handled? Is it OK for a single user to do such mass edits single-handedly? Does it really make sense to edit old, abandoned questions that have absolutely no relevance anymore and push them to the front-page?

In general, I have seen more good than bad coming out of mass edits. Old, abandoned questions do still have some relevance (we cite some of them occasionally), but trivial edits should not push them to the frontpage, if possible. I guess some like order more than others and I personally find it difficult to draw the line (we encourage editing in general). However, we could maybe automatically close contributions older than X for editing. This might be a question and a feature request on its own.

How should such things be reported when moderator flags are not handled?

Moderator flags must be handled. If not, we need more moderators.

-17

On the front page alone (active tab), I saw 13 questions in which, presumably (I didn't check all edit histories), the tag was removed. Although 13 is still a small tag, it would have been nice if there was a notice given (even though the editor in question personally disagrees).

My question to the administration would be if we are going to give certain users slack regarding the rules we have set as a community, or if we are going to uphold those rules and actually enforce them (one way or another)?

  • 11
    What rules specifically are you referring to? – Cerbrus Aug 27 '18 at 11:52
  • meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/324070/… How about these? – Luuklag Aug 27 '18 at 12:39
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    Can you explain how, in this case, pnuts is given slack in regards to those rules? Strictly speaking, he hasn't broken any of those rules, as far as I'm aware. The problem here is just that he's mass-editing posts without discussing it first. – Cerbrus Aug 27 '18 at 12:40
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    @Luuklag: They technically didn't violate any of these rules from this post. There is a exception for tags < 50 questions. The problem is just the number of edits and the lack of communication. I hope I have nowhere in the question implied that the edits itself were wrong. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 12:41
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    @Cerbrus, If you read with more detail "If you have authoritative knowledge of all technologies relevant to the tag, have conferred with at least one other trusted community member, and are dealing with a tag that has a small number of questions (< 50), then you can go ahead and remove it yourself or with a little ad hoc help." Only the last argument in this rule is respected (<50). If you read his now deleted answer he doesn't make any hints as to the other aspects. Where agreed the first is less relevant on meta. – Luuklag Aug 27 '18 at 12:51
  • @BDL, If I made the suggestion that I disagree with the edits taking place I appoligize, that wasn't the intention. With regards to the rules, please see my comment towards Cerberus above. – Luuklag Aug 27 '18 at 12:52
-30

by the same user

It would be a problem if it was several users? It would be a problem if it was different kinds of edits instead of mostly in the same vein? Why nobody is mentioning certain Owl?

If the answer to those questions is "no", "no" and "who's that?" then this discussion isn't about something actively harmful. Meta is very, very slow. Sometimes I can go to sleep, wake up and the front page is almost the same. That there are burst of activity, be it a single user or several, is normal given our sleep/active cycles. If you don't want to see said burst then maybe its time to looking for professional opportunities in the other side of the planet?

  • 18
    "Yes", "Yes", "Wut?". The problem is that these are bulk edits that haven't been discussed before-hand. – Cerbrus Aug 27 '18 at 13:22
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    @Cerbrus well, your last answer invalidates the first two. There's a certain owl that makes burst of edits too and nobody has complained. Basically, if there's a problem, that problem has existed since eons ago, and nobody until now complained. – Braiam Aug 27 '18 at 13:23
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    Because Meta is slow I expect any activity to be relevant. And not see an election bug from 2 years ago or password recovery problems from 4 years ago... – André Kool Aug 27 '18 at 13:24
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    It would be a problem if it was several users? Yes, definitely. It would be a problem if it was different kinds of edits instead of mostly in the same vein? If a user (or a group of them) proposes 250 edits in 4 days which obviously are not from natural usage of the site, then Yes. Why nobody is mentioning certain Owl? Who is Owl? – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 13:24
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    @Braiam: That certain owl hasn't been making edits in this quantity. If he was, this issue would've been raised already. – Cerbrus Aug 27 '18 at 13:25
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    @FélixGagnon-Grenier: Could you point me to what/who owl is and how this is related to the discussion? – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 13:38
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    @BDL But the first rule is never to talk about the club! Ok let's stop the mascarade, the point is that Peter Mortensen, an very prominent editor of the Stack Exchange Networks as a whole, is thought by Briam to have been making the same things as the user mentioned in this question, without problem. I don't think that's true, because as Cerbrus says, Peter hasn't been going on such sprees. This might auto destruct at some point. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Aug 27 '18 at 13:45
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    The inability of anyone to identify the owl is astounding. The guy has as many edits under its belt than the 3 next editors! – Braiam Aug 27 '18 at 13:46
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    @Braiam Peter mostly edits recently active questions, he doesn't go out of his way to dig up old questions. – Stijn Aug 27 '18 at 13:51
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    Hmm, ok. If I would have noticed edits happening in the same quantity from another user, believe me, I would have asked exactly the same question. Obliviously I didn't, so, at least for me this edits were less annoying. Might be because Peter most of the time edits already active questions. And there is a huge difference between editing (on average) 5-10 questions a day, mostly active ones or directly related to active ones and editing 60+ questions a day, mostly old, inactive and outdated ones. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 13:55
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    @FélixGagnon-Grenier: Thanks for the explanation. I was thinking about the Sparrows and Owls: Characterisation of Expert Behaviour in StackOverflow (2014) paper. Completely wrong track. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 13:57
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    @Braiam No, I am not sure, that's really just a "I think". I too have never seen an active meta pages such as presently with Peter's name all over, but I might indeed be wrong. I didn't think it was such an important issue as to specifically ask you for citation / proof of your claim, but if anyone could pull out actual numbers for both Peter and pnuts, I believe that concern would be addressed. Without numbers, it's moot really. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Aug 27 '18 at 14:03
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    @Braiam I do not recall ever seeing Peter being responsible for 2/3rds of the Front Page on meta consistently for 3+ days. That is the issue I had with it – psubsee2003 Aug 27 '18 at 14:13
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    Peter's edits aren't anywhere near as frequent as pnuts'. I mean, you need only look at their recent activity. Pnuts has close to 4 pages of edits in the last 24 hours. Peter has only 4 edits. – Cerbrus Aug 27 '18 at 14:20
  • 3
    @Cerbrus Peter hasn't been editing as much lately, and while I don't ever remember there being quite so many edits in such a short period of time, there have been times in the past where it's been close. At least enough to be somewhat disruptive. – Servy Aug 28 '18 at 0:53
-56
  1. Replacing "StackOverflow" with "Stack Overflow" has indeed been part of this, but actually quite a small part, I believe, unless you have figures otherwise?

  2. There are indeed some edits I would rather not have felt appropriate but unfortunately I can't avoid them if making edits for other reasons (eg retagging) and to comply with demands that all edits are 'comprehensive'.

  3. Taking your figures (~250 edits in 3.5 days) this is (just) less than 3/hr, which seems reasonable to me (given such a huge backlog) and has been indicated previously as acceptable.

  4. If you find the Active view too cluttered for your taste, there are always four other views of that page, including Newest.

  5. 'Applying' to meta before each edit would clutter up the Active view even more (twice over?) - and be even more tedious that just 'getting on with it'! I do believe I understand your frustration but my actions (if not my motives) are on record and as long as the results are good for the Community I consider my motives largely irrelevant.

  6. In the past week or so I have indeed "burninated" about three dozen meta (as in, for Meta Stack Overflow) tags, mostly single use and all bar one (I think) without Usage guides. Mostly I have substituted other, existing, tags (hence some of my edits).

  7. Sadly, "co-ordination" does not work here. See for example. Users on meta have a propensity to talk the hind legs off a donkey (do you need examples?) and with some exceptions rarely getting much achieved.

  8. Comments on a post are not to ask the editor what his plans are. (Click on add a comment to see what they are for.)

  9. I find your Q here acceptably appropriate and trust this answer contains the information you were seeking. If not I may be able to clarify, should you point me to where that is required.

  • 12
    Could you maybe explain your lack of responce to comments (This is how I see it)? I think that is a mayor part of the frustration (atleast with me). – André Kool Aug 27 '18 at 8:42
  • 3
    That's point 8 of this answer. Maybe you want them expanding on this? – yivi Aug 27 '18 at 8:43
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    In the case of the tag-synonyms there were a lot of comments asking you for clarification (what comments are for as you stated yourself in this answer) and you didn't respond. – André Kool Aug 27 '18 at 8:44
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    Yes, my main frustration comes from the fact that it is impossible to communicate with you. The comment tooltip says "Use comments to ask for clarification...", that's exactly what I did. Which other reason could there be that you can ping editors in comments than to ask why they did the edit? Even with this explanation, I still think that editing such a large number of posts without any discussion/plan is suboptimal. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 8:50
  • 32
    Intentionally ignoring clarification requests because "that's not what comments are for" only increases frustration. 250 edits may not seem like a lot, but on Meta it is. Currently the majority of the front page are posts edited by you. – Stijn Aug 27 '18 at 8:50
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    Furthermore, the Active sorting is so much more useful than Newest sorting on Meta. – Stijn Aug 27 '18 at 8:50
  • 13
    I also think that editing 250 meta posts is really a lot. In the same timeframe the 250 edits were made, only 55 new (not deleted) questions were asked. – BDL Aug 27 '18 at 8:52
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    You obviously shouldn't post a Meta post for each edit, but you probably shouldn't make this many edits without getting some community input first. You can either ask in chat (which also shouldn't be spammed too much, but should be better than Meta) or post a single Meta discussion summarising the edits you plan on making (in broad terms) and asking whether that's okay and how to best go about it (to minimise disruption). – Dukeling Aug 27 '18 at 9:18
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    I have no doubt you're trying to improve the site, but I'd strongly urge you to slow down on edits. – Yvette Colomb Aug 27 '18 at 10:07
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    Just so you know all the tag removals must be discussed and documented on Meta. Therefore, please don't go and burninate tags on your free will. Also editing really old and closed questions just because of small issues like a wrong tag, or a typo isn't worth doing. Remember that bouncing something on to the main page also removes posts off the main page, which were worthy to be seen by more people and therefore reduces the time which they rightfully had to get. – Bhargav Rao Aug 27 '18 at 10:25
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    So you'll just keep on editing? Maybe take a break while this discussion is ongoing. – Stijn Aug 27 '18 at 10:29
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    To keep on editing non-stop even while a conversation is happening about your actions is quite disrespectful. You could try to address the concerns that have been raised here. – yivi Aug 27 '18 at 10:36
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    Wow... The points in this answer are so disingenuous... "Comments on a post are not to ask the editor what his plans are." The possibility to edit posts is not for mass deciding that everything should be as you like, yet you did it all the same. "[...] and with some exceptions rarely getting much achieved." And what, you believe you have achieved something here? According to what metrics? Yours? Brb editing every posts I can find to fine tune everything to my liking. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Aug 27 '18 at 20:21
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    It's nice that you seem to have moved on to tag wiki edits, but some of them are not that useful. Don't just add a link or copy a blurb from Wikipedia (we have a reject reason for that!). Add usage information relevant to this community. Also, you have edited the Meta tag for Documentation five times. Documentation est mort! est fin! Kaput! t3h 0b501337 n t3h d3p|~3|<473d! Pushing daisy wheels! Pining for the core! It is an ex-feature! – Robert Columbia Aug 28 '18 at 13:51
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    @RobertColumbia: Bereft of life, it rests in peace! – Cerbrus Aug 28 '18 at 14:10

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