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I understand that some new users may find some curt or "please post your code" comments daunting, snarky, whatever, and all things considered, this isn't a bad thing to remind users that the person is new when commenting their post.

But on answers ?

xxxx is a new contributor. Be nice, and check out our Code of Conduct. 

Answers contain technical information. It's just not acceptable to use comment-like language, and they're not only targeted to the new user posting a question, but to help improving the knowledge database of the site.

  • comments are directed to the OP to help clarifying the question
  • answers are directed to the community and the OP

So I don't see why the "Be nice, and check out our Code of Conduct." is there, and only for new contributors posts. Either it's there (it's implicit, and answers tone should be neutral anyway) or it isn't, regardless of the OP being a new contributor or not.

Am I missing something?

  • 37
    @TemaniAfif good thinking but ... no... We probably should replace it by "this section is for answers only", given the number of non-answers I'd dealing with in the VLQ – Jean-François Fabre Aug 25 '18 at 20:21
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    @TemaniAfif If that was the reasoning, new contributors should see it on every answer box, and experienced contributors should see it on nothing, That's not a logical explanation imo. – Erik A Aug 25 '18 at 20:42
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    @ErikvonAsmuth it wasn't a serious comment ;) simply trying to figure out some crazy logic to justify all those banners ... I myself don't like them : meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/372877/… – Temani Afif Aug 25 '18 at 21:02
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    Ever since the "new contributor" notice, I've seen at least one case of an answer starting with "Welcome to Stack Overflow!". We really don't want this, but the current design seems to be inviting users to add noise. – E_net4 the Abused Downvoter Aug 25 '18 at 21:06
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    @TemaniAfif: There is no logic in the illogical. I'm afraid this also applies to your question, JFF (neverthelsee, +1 for your persistent hunt for the Wumpus, aka "reason" ;-) – too honest for this site Aug 25 '18 at 21:24
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    damn SO has become an extremely complex forum to understand. – user734028 Aug 26 '18 at 11:29
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    @user734028 Actually, SO is not a forum. – Dalija Prasnikar Aug 26 '18 at 15:04
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    This "Actually, SO is not a forum" statement and its upvotes further prove the point of @user6655984 and @user734028! SO often is not a very welcoming place, and encouraging "Welcome to Stack Overflow!" is much better than negative, condescending attitudes. If we don't like that in otherwise good answers, we can edit it out. – jnylen Aug 27 '18 at 3:37
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    @jnylen We've always been editing it out. However, editing takes time. – user202729 Aug 27 '18 at 4:07
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    Driving away new users with condescending attitudes costs more time over the long run. Those users, if shown the value of this site and encouraged to stick around, will eventually become active members and moderators themselves. – jnylen Aug 27 '18 at 4:43
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    I'm not into newbie bashing & I fight this as well, I don't understand your point. I very rarely saw insulting answers (other than blatant spam and non-answers like djfkshjfhsdjf). Comments, that I can understand. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 27 '18 at 8:02
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre I feel some snark in your profile picture. How do I flag it? ;) – Ahmed Abdelhameed Aug 27 '18 at 11:19
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    @E_net4 Yep, there are a lot of these actually! – Ahmed Abdelhameed Aug 27 '18 at 11:24
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    @AhmedAbdelhameed it's not snark it's irreverence :) – Jean-François Fabre Aug 27 '18 at 11:43
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    SO just put the "Be nice" text in as many places as possible where people interact. They hope it sticks even if it is annoying sometimes.Some kind of psychological trick, I guess. – Trilarion Aug 28 '18 at 12:57
57

The "hand" is about increasing new user retention.

TLDR

  • SO is on the decline (check Tim Post's MSE post).

  • People are not always patient when answering questions. In fact some people can be snarky and rude. This causes people to not return to the site.

  • The hand is to try and alert and remind people that we do indeed have a code of conduct and expect people to follow it. It's obvious, so anyone posting an answer won't miss it.

Why is this on new users?

  • Currently new users are being scared off the site at a rate that will kill the site.
  • The site will gradually die if we don't have enough new users staying and contributing.

Getting the attention of non-meta folk

... we're talking to people who typically aren't causing the problems that we're trying to solve. The fact that we found a need for an indicator is a big clue there, why didn't we just write a post that said "Please be extra careful when dealing with new users?" Because the people that would most benefit from that guidance, for the most part, don't come here.

The reason the network has placed "helping?" hands at every port of communication with a new user is in an attempt to get the poster's attention. The reason this has been made so obvious, is due to the fact that the people the network are trying to communicate with, within the UX, are not regulars on Meta.

So we need to consider the UX changes are not so much for you and I (you being the reader of this post), but for the people who are not reading this post.

The site is facing attrition that is unsustainable

The new user base that replenishes the site and forms our core user base is declining. The site will actually close down if we do not make genuine new users more welcome. It's in everyone's interest to do so (if we want the site to continue).

Our attrition rate is concerning.

New users just don't stick around anywhere close to how they did a few years ago. I'm not going to post the exact rates, and I'm not going to post the exact metrics that we use to consider someone 'lost' as far as likely to re-engage, but I will explain it in very simple terms.

Let's say you have a bank account. Every month, $1000 goes into that account, and $960 goes out of it. You will never lose your income, and your expenses will always stay the same. Sure, you don't manage to save much, but year over year, it adds up, right?

Well, what happens if the income isn't infinite? Let's not talk about money, let's talk about users, the size of the market that we serve, and the rate at which it grows and replenishes. If we lose even 25% of the users we manage to convince to interact with our sites, and the number that try every day keeps going up exponentially, then it's only a matter of time before we burn through an entire market faster than that market significantly replenishes itself.

This is because people had really bad first experiences, and depending on how influential they are, we've lost them and possibly dozens more. It's difficult to calculate who won't try something because of this. But if we don't control this rate, we could (much sooner than later) say that the whole market uses, has tried and stopped using, or won't try our sites.

That is to say, there's a hard stop where you run out of people that are (1) interested in [topic] and (2) successful using your software, and the faster you hemorrhage new users, the faster you approach that point. This is where new users don't replace long-term engaged users that tend to just naturally move on after they've done all they came here to do. This "shrink" in communities is perennial and usually healthy, as long as you eventually move to more coming in than leaving.

The network is losing users and there's concern about the site's future.

It's easy to decry "it's the crap that's killing the site". The truth of the matter is, there will be no site if its growth declines and remains that way. We need to maintain quality content and growth in constructive user base.

Zooming out on the UX

We need to remind ourselves the majority of the main site don't read meta. Our core users who are also active on meta are not the target for the UX changes. The target is the 1000s of people who do not read meta or come into chat

We're all on the same team. Regular meta goers, moderators and even the network powers are all on the same side. We're all just looking at it from different perspectives. We all want the site to be good and succeed. We don't want it to deteriorate and die a slow and painful death.

You (the reader) and I care for the site out of a love and respect for its content and the effort of our community. The network needs to make money and so has a financially vested interest in sustaining it. Either way it would be good to try and zoom out the focus on the UX to have a bird's-eye view of who we're targeting here.

Conflating welcoming new users with unwelcoming old users

The old users have (by definition) proven to stick around, but it's important that our we are for our core user base. However, if we can be mindful not to conflate the arguments. Trying to improve new user retention is not necessarily mutually exclusive to trying to improve old user retention. As I see it the active meta community sometimes sees assisting (genuine) newcomers as not supporting the old timers. We need to take a breath and look after both.

Currently there are two types of problem users that the UX is addressing. The ones who are not active on meta, but put newcomers off with their behaviour (not new). The newcomers who put no effort into contributing and become abusive when asked to improve. Abusive with words or creating and disposing of accounts to continually spam the site with crappy posts. Both of these need to be dealt with.

It's important to remember, it's not the genuine newcomer who is the enemy (Even the newcomer who posts a lousy first post may end up becoming a long term contributor of quality content). It's the newcomer who doesn't care about contributing and the "old-timer" who doesn't care about the newcomers who do care. (Yeah, a lot of nested caring - I need coffee.)

What about the regular users?

I don't have the answer. I'm pretty certain the powers that be have had a scare and they're taking new user retention seriously (I'm gleaning this from meta). I also happen to know that the powers that be are desperately trying to put in fixes to help the established user base (this is from talking to them personally).

The teams are snowed under (they told me), and the communication on the meta sites is not as through as it has been historically (my observation). They're not consulting so much, as trying to stop the ship from sinking (my thoughts). I do know they're listening to all the feedback (my communications with them). So I know we're not being ignored, hence I am patient and trying to convey that to the community, as I am also a member of this community and understand that changes have been a long time coming. What was 6-8 weeks is feeling more like 6-8 years.

Conclusion

For the sake of improving user retention, I suggest we work together as a community, as in the coming years, there won't be a community if we don't.

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    To be fair, it seems like the first-poster user base has changed a lot over 10 years (speaking from reading only, I was not actually here for 10 years). What I can say from my much shorter experience, "We need to maintain quality content and growth in constructive user base" seems much harder done than said. And if you realize it cannot be done, which do you give up first - maintaining growth (which would freeze things at the current technologies, potentially) or lowering quality (which could make navigating to all content much more difficult)? – kabanus Aug 26 '18 at 6:14
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    but, but, I'm not against this new contributor stuff (even if I'm joking about it sometimes). It's just that I feel that it has nothing to do in the "answer" section. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 7:37
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre if you read my post it has everything to do with the answer section, in fact anywhere contact is made with new users. As clearly there's a section of the non-meta reading community who make snide remarks - including within answers. Clear? Please advise with customary wake up ping ;) – Yvette Colomb Aug 26 '18 at 8:01
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    so basically you're saying that this answer banner is to protect new contributors from ... other new contributors ? (answer appreciated, this is the "best" answer so far, because IMHO this "feature" it makes no sense in the current state) – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 8:12
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre not to protect new contributors from new contributors. To protect new contributors from rude contributors (new or old) who either don't read meta, or obstinately ignore it (more so from the first group) – Yvette Colomb Aug 26 '18 at 8:14
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    ok, so old contributors do not get to be protected then? Everyone should be protected – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 8:18
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre meh, the old users have (by definition) proven to stick around. But it's a good point, and one I actively defend. It's important not to conflate the arguments. Trying to improve new user retention is not necessarily mutually exclusive to trying to improve old user retention. As I see it the community is taking assisting (genuine) newcomers as not supporting the old timers. We need to take a breath and look after both. – Yvette Colomb Aug 26 '18 at 8:23
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    I'm beginning to understand that a compromise must be made to avoid newcomers to leave the site because we need the traffic. It's just that it could be improved message-wise for the answers. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 8:45
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    I don't follow the logic in this answer at all. What good is this "new contributor" banner in answers if your goal is to make new users feels more welcome? Has SO ever had a problem with too much snark or other "unwelcoming" language in answers? – Aran-Fey Aug 26 '18 at 10:43
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    All of this is correct and good, but it ultimately doesn't answer the question. Putting up that new contributor indicator in the answer box doesn't really make any sense. I mean, I understand there's some contrived logic behind putting it below the user's card and the comment box, because we somehow believe that users will be less ... nasty in the comments when they see that. However, how exactly is the answer supposed to be influenced by that indicator? Be more "patient" in answering the question? What does that mean? – Masked Man Aug 26 '18 at 11:21
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    As someone who refers to this and other SE sites regularly, but who does not use any of the privileges I've been given here or elsewhere because of the annoying feedback when I first tried, and who - as a technical user with over 30 years experience - finds the number of non duplicate questions closed as duplicates of a merely similar question by people who clearly didn't understand it, I find it interesting that the site is on the decline...but not unexpected. I don't list my experience in my SE profiles because a high ranked SE user mocked one of my questions, for example. – simpleuser Aug 27 '18 at 0:53
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    @ReblochonMasque no, you're failing to read my posts or understand what I'm saying. So don't get all irrational under my post. I'm actually a human being and am tired of dealing with irrational outbursts under my posts. If you cannot see the site has much bigger problems that a UI hand, then clearly I've not been communicating clearly. It's not about irritating old users. Take it personally if you choose to, but don't carry on with me. I've over it. – Yvette Colomb Aug 27 '18 at 5:58
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    Why does this website have a need to retain new users? I remember the first time I met developers online. Snark and derision was turned up to 11 everywhere from usenet to IRC if you didn't have the propensity to guess at what others will tell you when you ask a question (e.g. do more research, read a f*king book, what did you try, create a minimal test case, etc.). When you lack empathy, so does the internet. Not writing a test case or not reading the source is like writing in all caps. People are sensitive. And people don't want insensitive people around. So it makes sense to boot them off. – nurettin Aug 27 '18 at 8:42
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    @YvetteColomb I've had my hand in the rise and fall of communities i've created so far. The lessons I learned about it was if you focus to much on pleasing the core members and are not inviting/accepting or putting too much rules on the newbies at once, they will move to easier pastures. Just like you won't let a 1st year high school student not write an university paper, new users need a lot of leeway and are best triggered via rewards(badges, upvotes, etc..) to improve their behaviour. "rotten apples" should be banned/removed asap since they will poison the batch. balancing growth vs culling – Tschallacka Aug 27 '18 at 9:24
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    I am not convinced that the decrease of the user base is due to "scaring off" of new users. That would mean the snark has increased in the latter years, has it. Not sure that is true. My theory is that, instead, all the questions that newbies could ask have been asked already. And that new people visit here, find their answer, and then leave again without feeling the need to post. – Mr Lister Aug 28 '18 at 6:14
0

As a fairly new user of the site I would like to share my experience with the "new contributor" tag next to my answers (and questions - i haven't asked one yet).

Why the "new contributor" tag is a good thing

As you have mentioned in your post, seeing the tag will remind people that this person is new to the site. I totally agree with showing the tag there, responses and comments will take this into account. As a new contributor the "fear of a duplicate post/etc" is persistent, the tag is one step towards overcoming that fear. People might take a few more seconds when replying to a post and clarify the whole situation.

In my opinion the effect of overcoming this fear and therefore using the site to its full potential applies to replies as well. As a "newbie" you might be convinced that your technical know-how does not stand the high requirements of the website. Thus, your answer might not be perfect. But by showing-off that "Hello I am new, please keep that in mind" I might be more confident in posting my answer even if there might be a mistake.

The tag also has a link to the code of conduct which delivers the message: "Please read this to write a good answer and learn how we want to communicate here". This is also reasonable to show to a new user because not everyone goes through the tutorials after sign-up just to ask one urgent question. It does not even have to be clicked - just by "being there" it conveys a message.


Long story short:
My personal perception of all the "warnings" has been throughout positive. I think this has the right effect on new contributors to convince them to adapt their style of writing to the guidelines and to transform them into the community members you want to have here in the long term.



Update after mason's comments

My intention was to show the point of view of a new user and the effects it might have on a new user. The tag being displayed to me as a new user (underneath my username) was the one I have been speaking about - the other one in/or above the answer box was not the target of my post because I could not represent the point of view of an experienced user and I haven't seen it before. See both here

I would like to clarify again, I would not expect special treatment for being tagged as the new one. In my opinion this provides information (which may be redundant due to the reputation that is already displayed) of a user being the new one.

Personally, I would definately choose to use the tag as a new user if it was an optional choice, because I appreciate comments to enhance future answers. So if an experienced user points out an issue with my question/answer by voting, I would like to know what the reason was, to change it in this specific post/future posts.

As this might apply to most users (not just the new ones), it could still influence the more experienced user to write a comment on his/her vote even if he/she thinks that the reason for his/her vote is quite obvious and the author could figure this out him-/herself. A post being duplicate or not specifying any sign of research/commitment is obviously not what this kind of feedback is needed for.

While writing this I figured out that a solution to the "a new user does not mean he/she is inexperienced" issue could be making the tag optional for new users. This would also solve the issue of creating new accounts (issue has been pointed out here). But this should not be discussed here.

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    I don't agree with this answer but at least 1) it attempts to answer with a good level of quality, and 2) an answer from a new contributor on meta must be encouraged. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 28 '18 at 13:58
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    I don't care if you're new or not, I'm still going to treat you the same. My standards don't drop. If you are unable to find an obvious duplicate, I will downvote your question for lack of research. There's no reason to fear: just do a decent amount of research before asking your question. So no, this banner does nothing. By the way, if your question is "urgent", that's not our problem. The standards don't drop just because you perceive your issue as being more important than everyone else's. – mason Aug 28 '18 at 16:25
  • @mason I think you might have taken my answer too personal. I share the same opinion about an obvious duplicate. I have not tried to stop anyone from downvoting a question when it is obvious that the answer to the subject has been posted several times on the website. I did not say that "my question" was urgent, I even stated that I haven't asked one, yet. I just noticed that you obtain a badge for going through the tutorial and I discoverd many new users on SO without it - so I thought that might be the reason for it. My intention of this post was to give an insight of an actual newcomer. – CrimsonMike Aug 28 '18 at 16:46
  • @mason Well, yesterday I wrote my first answer on SO. I am not as experienced as you might be at this point so I may struggle to express myself explaining a technical topic because I have not done this at a regular basis so far. The banner will display my "newbieness" and therefore someone might actually propose an edit before just downvoting an answer. With this in mind you might actually write something instead of sitting in front of the screen and thinking: Well, I could have said this. I had this several times: Writing an answer to a question and then second-guessing it and not posting it. – CrimsonMike Aug 28 '18 at 17:00
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    If someone wanted to downvote a question, do you really think that telling them to be welcoming is going to change that? And why do you think it's a good idea to treat anyone different based on their experience? The expectations don't change for you. For the most part, if your answer is 1) technically correct 2) written in understandable English 3) doesn't encourage security violations or violate other clear best practices. then you don't have much to worry. We are supposed to vote based on the quality of the post, not the newness of the account. And from what I can tell, that's what happens – mason Aug 28 '18 at 17:03
  • @CrimsonMike That's just wishful thinking. The banner is an attempt to change the community to vote based not on quality, but on who's asking/answering. That goes against everything this community is built on. Rather than achieving the more welcoming atmosphere you say you want, it's far more likely to drive a divisive wedge between new and experienced users. – mason Aug 28 '18 at 17:06
  • Answering your first question: I honestly don't know that but I think the chance is higher than without the tag being displayed. I don't expect any special treatment for someone with a different experience level but the point is that a recommendation or any type of suggestion is far more helpful for future answers of the new user. I would not label this as "special treatment" because the whole community does benefit from it. It is not said that this can not be done on answers/questions of users that are not new. In the end we all would like to meet those expectations but may struggle to do so. – CrimsonMike Aug 28 '18 at 17:11
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    @mason "The banner is an attempt to change the community to vote based not on quality, but on who's asking/answering" - Instead of voting: suggesting an edit or actually editing it is probably the way to go. As stated above by Yvette, the goal that should be achieved is growing the user base. A welcoming atmosphere is required to keep new users on the site. I totally agree that voting is still the most important part but explaining a vote would be even more helpful to someone like me. I appreciate your comment for example - so I might be able to enhance the whole meaning of my post. – CrimsonMike Aug 28 '18 at 17:20
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    You want us to perform different actions based on the experience level of the user. That, by definition, is special treatment. Whether the community benefits from special treatment you can debate if you want to, but our community has been built around a foundation that it doesn't matter who you are: as long as you provide quality content, we'll appreciate your contribution. That's what benefits the community, not accepting low quality content just because it came from someone who is new. – mason Aug 28 '18 at 17:23
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    Stack Exchange the company might be interested in growing the userbase. But I think most of us here do not care about that. Stack Overflow's goal shouldn't be to attract as many people as possible. It's to be a site for high quality questions and answers directly related to programming issues. – mason Aug 28 '18 at 17:24
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    The solution is to explain the vote as you did here. You are free to do what you want to do, nobody would be forced to vote/not vote. Quote: "as long as you provide quality content, we'll appreciate your contribution" - yes, this is the point - so we have to achieve two things: Encourage the user to use the site and still make clear that his/her contribution does not meet the requirements. I think the tag might be a solution for achieving both. Anyway, I would like to move this discussion to a chat but I don't think I can open one, yet. We both made our point clear. – CrimsonMike Aug 28 '18 at 17:32
  • @CrimsonMike Editing a post is not a substitute for providing accurate feedback on the post's quality. Sure, people are welcome to edit posts, but making an edit doesn't remove the need to vote on a post's quality. Also note that there are lots of people that edit lots of posts. Not just new users' posts. This has never really been a problem. It's a feature most other site's don't even have. That SO has it at all is a big step up from any alternative. – Servy Aug 28 '18 at 22:15
  • Unfortunately, I am not familiar with editing a post and the notification process (what details will you see of an edit, etc). Therefore, I am not able to know details concerning this at that point. As I explained in my update of the post, I think voting and giving the reason why is everything that a new user needs as feedback to develope. I do really not want to drift too far of my original statement which was just meant to be an opinion/experience I had so far. For any additional discussion, that goes beyond that experience, I am not able to give my opinion on because I have not tried it yet – CrimsonMike Aug 28 '18 at 22:45
-8

This makes sense and is appropriate. People abuse the answers on a regular basis, and there’s a lot of content in answers that violates the Code of Conduct. Much of it is deleted before it’s seen by many people, and most of it does not merit a Rude or Abusive flag, especially because answers (unlike comments) are community-editable. But that doesn’t mean abusive behavior in the answers section is at all rare.

Put differently, this statement of yours is extremely optimistic about how people actually use the site:

Answers contain technical information.

Good answers do that. Things people post as “answers” when they’re annoyed at an OP, not so much.

I’ll admit that I’m not the biggest fan of the “new contributor” warning. I don’t think we should have it anywhere. A user’s newness and reputation are irrelevant to the quality of a question or answer, and we should be respectful to all users, new or not. But I do see some value to it. And if we’re going to have the warning, it makes sense to remind people of it before they go off on a long-form version of “RTFM, use a debugger, and then just hire a real programmer.”

As an aside, if a user is truly a jerk in an answer to a new user’s question even after seeing that warning, well, let’s just say moderator actions may be less lenient if we have to step in.

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    I'm pretty sure that if people already ignore the fact that the button says "Post Your Answer" and proceed to post comments and questions that way, there's no amount of text or images that will keep them from doing it. And it's frequent, just follow the Natty bot in the SO biotics chat for an hour and you'll see at least 2 posts pop up of things that aren't answers. Now, if we're concerned about people being rude or otherwise violate the CoC with the answer box, which we also do see several times a day, the "New Contributor" banner won't have any more effect than the existing text does. – Davy M Aug 25 '18 at 22:44
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    My comments are coming from the ♦ moderator perspective. While SO botics does great work, I can assure you the abuse and NAA problems are worse than you likely realize. Abusive and NAA content is posted many times per hour, not just several times per day. How much impact the banner has remains to be seen, but it’s at least an effort to encourage civil behavior. – Ed Cottrell Aug 25 '18 at 23:52
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    errr, then this text should be 'This section is for answers, don't post "yup, same problem" or "I agree with xxx"' for newcomers (the "protected" question text has the same description). My point is: no need to remind the extra niceness in answers. It's missing the point – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 7:40
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    @Jean-François I think I may not have made my point clearly. My point isn’t that too many people post things that aren’t answers. That’s true, but Davy brought that up, not me. My point is that even real answers are often very rude or abrasive. They are not always, as you said, just technical information. They are often very pointed & unkind. As a mod, I see more of this than I did before I became a mod. My argument is: if we’re going to have a “new contributor” warning (which is debatable), having it show for both commenters & answerers makes some sense. – Ed Cottrell Aug 26 '18 at 7:57
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    but why only for new users then? I'm "old" but if I lazily ask bad php questions (which I don't know at all), people will probably treat me as a newbie and will bash me in answers (ok I can downvote/edit/delete) – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 8:35
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre If I we’re a cynical person I’d say it’s because old users don’t impress investors. A constant stream of new users impresses investors, and that needs to be achieved at any cost to the old users and quality of the site. Luckily im not a cynic... – Clive Aug 26 '18 at 8:40
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    aaahh I get it. I'll stick the stack overflow logo on my bike. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 8:41
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre That’s a key point, though: experienced users are expected to know better. New users are not always familiar with SO, which is very different from other sites, even other Q&A sites. Our definitions of “off-topic” and “shows effort” in particular, can be surprising and overwhelming. We shouldn’t put up with garbage, no-effort questions from anyone, but we should probably remember that we were all new here, once. That means that adding a reminder not to lash out at new users is at least a positive effort, not the end of SO as we know it. – Ed Cottrell Aug 26 '18 at 8:42
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    okay, I get your point. But bashing isn't tolerated, new user or not. It can be edited out if the rest of the answer is good, BTW. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 8:44
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    @Jean-FrançoisFabre You’re absolutely right about that, of course. The goal of the warnings, as I understand it, is to stop bad behavior preemptively. It’s a better experience for everyone and less taxing on the reviewers and moderators if the content starts out polite, instead of having to be edited into shape. – Ed Cottrell Aug 26 '18 at 8:52
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    I'm sorry this got so many downvotes. We need a "be nice to the mods" banner :) the mods aren't writing the rules. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 26 '18 at 9:12
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    @user202729 I’m not sure what you mean (instead of what?), but more flagging isn’t the solution. We already handle about 2,000 flags per day, and that doesn’t scale well. Besides, flags are only useful for after a bad post is written. The goal is to prevent the bad post. Flags don’t help at all with that. – Ed Cottrell Aug 26 '18 at 12:23
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    "My point isn’t that too many people post things that aren’t answers. That’s true, but Davy brought that up, not me" My point wasn't that some number about how many people do it, my point was that people ignore the existing text that tells them to post an answer and post NAA and rude content, so we can't expect more text to make any difference. The stuff about the Natty bot was just so that anyone could see the kind of things that are posted with blatant disregard for the text on the button they're clicking. – Davy M Aug 26 '18 at 14:07
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    @user734028 (serious answer) Because people disagree with it. – user202729 Aug 27 '18 at 4:08
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    @jnylen So expressing our disagreement is an example of a "problem with the community"? I hardly think so. – mason Aug 28 '18 at 16:30
-25

I think this is designed to remind people to be welcoming, and thus encourage newer users to stick around.

There is a huge difference between these two ways of responding to a question:

  • This question is not allowed here, read the rules
  • Hi xxx, this seems like a "fix my code" type question without sufficient detail, so it's probably not a good fit for this site. Please read our guidelines on asking questions.

The first will drive away new users. The second will help them stay around and become productive members and eventually moderators of the site, as well as helping to turn around the often-negative reputation of SO on the web.

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    Hi jnylen, seems like you're missing the point by a mile: the 2 ways you've decribed are comment responses, not answers. My question was about this message in the answer box – Jean-François Fabre Aug 27 '18 at 6:20
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    Same principle applies. Maybe the design could be improved or the intent clarified, but reminding people to be nice is not a bad thing. – jnylen Aug 27 '18 at 6:22
  • okay, but in that case, it should be reminded whatever the OP is, new or old. – Jean-François Fabre Aug 27 '18 at 6:23
  • I can think of at least 3 reasons not to do that. – jnylen Aug 27 '18 at 6:24
  • It's more important for new users because they are more likely to ask questions that need improvement. – jnylen Aug 27 '18 at 6:25
  • It's more important for new users because they are more likely to leave and never come back if they have a bad experience. – jnylen Aug 27 '18 at 6:25
  • Showing the message all the time for everyone makes woole answering questions more likely to ignore it. – jnylen Aug 27 '18 at 6:26
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    Both of these would be unacceptable in an answer. It would be good if you could come up with examples that read like answers not comments to prove your point, since OP's argument as I read it is basically "there's no place for emotions in answers anyways". – Jiri Tousek Aug 27 '18 at 8:43
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    @jnylen If you argue that "same principle applies" you need to explain it in more details. I can see no way the "same principle" can be applied to an answer -- as said in the question, answers contains technical information. – user202729 Aug 28 '18 at 6:10

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