64

I left a couple of comments on this question, which is a near duplicate of another question the same user asked a couple of days ago. Both of these are quite broad, and I've flagged the newest question appropriately.

The comments were basically poking the OP to ask their boss for clarification of what they want queried (as was commented in the previous question), and letting them know that posting near-duplicate questions is unnecessary when editing will get the question bumped.

"Any idea on where I start?" Perhaps ask your boss? As per comments on your previous question, if your superior asked you to write a hive query, you should ask what exactly they want to query for.


Also, you don't need to ask the same question twice. Editing your original question with additional information is enough to get it bumped to the homepage.

I then got a response from another user saying that they found these "a bit rude on your part". Personally I didn't think these were terribly rude, but I haven't had my coffee yet. Am I being too rude here, and if so, how can I improve these sort of comments for next time? Alternately, should I not have commented at all in this case, as the question would possibly be closed as too broad/unclear?

  • 34
    Curt, maybe, but mostly ok. Could have phrased that "Your boss would be the most likely person to know". The second one is simply stating facts. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Aug 14 '18 at 23:45
  • 43
    There is only one conceivable way this guy is not going to lose his job. You provided advice that was helpful to him, the other user posted a comment that has nothing whatsoever to do with the question. Comments need to be on topic, flag it as "no longer needed". That user needs to learn how to flag himself, they don't keep it a secret. – Hans Passant Aug 14 '18 at 23:59
  • 11
    I think that user probably read, Perhaps ask your boss?, as a sarcastic rhetorical question, especially since you go on to point out that someone has suggested it before. – BSMP Aug 15 '18 at 0:10
  • 4
    themuse.com/advice/… – Dom Aug 15 '18 at 3:06
  • 2
    @FélixGagnon-Grenier fun choice of words, the definition given by Google for "curt" is "rudely brief" ;) – Gimby Aug 15 '18 at 7:20
  • 68
    All looks good to me - this whole "safe space" trend with the new CoC is being taken too far by some members, in my opinion. We work in a stressful, fast-moving industry, characterised by short, sharp bursts of information. I, for one, don't want to spend ages figuring out how to not offend someone before trying to help them. – Richard Le Mesurier Aug 15 '18 at 7:38
  • 2
    @Gimby heh. I thought it was a fancy word for "short". – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Aug 15 '18 at 10:10
  • 2
    @FélixGagnon-Grenier brevity is pretty fancy. – Gimby Aug 15 '18 at 11:19
  • 7
    @Gimby: That definition is a bit on the simple side, I think. My OED says this: "So brief as to be wanting in courtesy or suavity". And the thesaurus expands: "A curt statement or gesture is excessively businesslike and efficient, having had everything but the absolutely necessary minimum removed (he led the way with a curt ‘Follow me!’). The absence of any extra polite or friendly remarks may make a curt comment or person appear rude." I think Felix used the appropriate word here. – AkselA Aug 15 '18 at 18:59
  • 3
    @skomisa it is used in the military and government in the US - and literally means a person of superior rank and, usually, a supervisor. Subordinate is also used. In fact, most officers and enlisted would take great offense to someone calling them "dated, inappropriate" for referring to a superior officer or enlisted personnel (an act of respect for the rank earned). Most corporations are not multi-tiered in such a rigid manner but some are and many other fields still use terms like "immediate superior". – LinkBerest Aug 16 '18 at 1:07
  • 2
    @skomisa However the term would be considered at a corporation or other place of business: it is not, by itself, offensive. The tone, the choice of words in your comment are. If you don't like it you could have said: "I would have used supervisor over superior", instead of attacking the OP by picking words like "dated and uncalled for at best" - implying he was trying to cause offense. – LinkBerest Aug 16 '18 at 2:33
  • 6
    This picking apart of small variations of English using this sort of language is offensive and just what I feared would begin to happen with all this focus on comments during the "welcome campaign". I brought up the military, btw., because I served and once in a while I use language that is different then civilians - that comes from a different culture. I don't mind being informed about that and most times will adapt if it gives offence but I do, very much, mind when it is thrown back in my face. The language you chose was doing just that. – LinkBerest Aug 16 '18 at 2:34
  • 11
    @skomisa I don't understand why you think superior is offensive, loaded or outdated? It is a normal English term meaning someone above you in the chain of command or management (eg your supervisor, team leader, manager or maybe just someone more senior in your team). You are unnecessarily mincing words. – Mark Rotteveel Aug 16 '18 at 12:53
  • 3
    Personally, I find it not only rude but insulting when an op expects me to type out their sample data in order to proof a response to their problem. – user4039065 Aug 17 '18 at 9:40
  • 3
    If an OP, or anyone else, takes offence to such comments, they are psychologically incapable of handling computer programming, riddled as it is with terse error-messages, critical failures and spec deviations. They should not be posting on a site for professional and enthusiast programmers. The OP's inept attempt at emotional blackmail, ('I just started this job and the query is due tomorrow'), deserved a robust response and the question was rightly closed and deleted. – Martin James Aug 17 '18 at 13:27
96

"Any idea on where I start?" Perhaps ask your boss? As per comments on your previous question, if your superior asked you to write a hive query, you should ask what exactly they want to query for.

You could have phrased that "Your boss would be the most likely person to know".

Also, you don't need to ask the same question twice. Editing your original question with additional information is enough to get it bumped to the homepage.

That is simply factual. Being welcoming, does not mean adding please and thanks everywhere.

Being straight to the point does not strike me as rude, but sometimes things get hairy all the same. I don't think you should worry about it, and asking about it on meta puts you way off the danger zone.

  • 61
    Being welcoming, does not mean adding please and thanks everywhere. - upvoted for this. A lot of the 'rewritten to be less rude' type answers I see on meta involve, to be frank, nothing but more words. More words doesn't make something polite. It just makes it even harder for those who aren't as versed in English to get help. I think both of these comments are fine as is, but there's nothing wrong with your rewrite of the first either. – Shadow Aug 15 '18 at 6:16
  • 4
    Meh. I think your proposed rewrite of the first comment eliminates the implication of "how the hell should we know?" that to me seemed like it was previously the main point of the comment, and doesn't end up being any politer as a result. YMMV, but I'd recommend the original version over your rewrite. – Mark Amery Aug 16 '18 at 12:33
  • @Shadow I agree wholeheartedly, but I think that same examples of rude behavior in the CoC is simply being factual – Lamak Aug 16 '18 at 13:00
  • @Lamak - I totally agree that there are rude people. I just don't think this specific question is an example of that. – Shadow Aug 16 '18 at 23:14
  • "being straight to the point" is just another way of saying "ignore the other person entirely because i know the right answer here", which is rude and abrasive, but not overly offensive. – worc Aug 17 '18 at 22:44
63

Your comments are fine.

I'd suggest not worrying about something on here when a single user tells you you are "a bit rude".
Don't worry about not being "welcoming" enough. Don't get bullied into an overly polite form of communication when you have, in fact, done nothing wrong.

  • 4
    In particular, we have a whole lot of users that don't have English as their native language. They will certainly not be able to pick up any finer nuances. In addition, if someone found any of these comments rude, they need to grown much thicker skin, or get off the internet. When put in a bigger perspective, SO stands out as a beacon of politeness compared to most of the internet. – Lundin Aug 16 '18 at 14:45
-42

If you have to ask if you're being rude... then you probably are. Sometimes that's ok.

  • 5
    How is this a useful answer? You're answering OP's question with maybes... – Rakete1111 Aug 16 '18 at 0:48
  • 15
    I find your comment rude and unwelcoming @Rakete1111 ............. – Reblochon Masque Aug 16 '18 at 3:41
  • 10
    ... oh wait did I miss a joke here? In any event @spnkr, I actually observe quite the contrary. When people have the self-restraint of meta cognitive ability to second guess their actions, it generally is a sure sign that they were not rude/aggressive/whatever it is that they are asking about. Really rude people, never ask about if they are being rude. – Félix Gagnon-Grenier Aug 16 '18 at 13:00
  • Asking for some clarification on potential grey areas and especially with personal opinion related matters in no way makes what you are asking automatically true. – James Aug 17 '18 at 23:18

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .