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I'm not sure if this was proposed before in clear (if it was, please mark my question as duplicate), but when this idea comes up in discussions, most seem to agree it would be a good feature:

The proposal:

When a question is proposed for reopening (when it enters the reopening queue), notify each of the initial users who voted for closing it, as an invitation to revise their vote based on either modifications to the question itself or based on the argument/comment of the person who initiated reopening.


As an example case where this might have been a good feature, I'll point to a recent question I interacted with, which I think was wrongly closed, where I invited 3 of the closers to revise or explain their votes. Shortly after, the question received 2 reopening votes (besides mine) (probably from them, but I can't be sure ). None of them brought any counter-argument in the question comments.

Do note that I'm not interested in reopening the question per-se. I pointed to it as an example on how the closing/re-opening system, in current form, can hardly be described as "working well". Even though it appears my argument convinced 2 of the initial closers, the question is still closed. Yes, I have the option of additionally inviting the initial 2 closers to also revise their votes and chances are they might do it, but it seems like a big effort one has to put into opening a closed question and that, in general, is not a good thing, IMHO.

I'd go as far as to ask you not to interact with that question at all, to allow it to remain relevant as an example for this one. As a matter of record, the linked question currently sits at 35 views and no modification happened in its status in the past 24 hours (afaict) so chances were it would have remained closed.

Getting back to the subject at hand, I'm wondering if, in principle, the vote for reopening a question coming from someone who initially voted for closing it should not weigh more than a normal reopen vote, since the question technically doesn't have 5 closing votes anymore (one was retracted).

Another, related issue would be that current re-opening process involves simply pushing a button. One cannot write a description for reopening reasoning. When such a description is necessary, one only has the option of adding a comment under the question or adding a note in the body of the question itself.

As a final thought, while researching all of the above, I found out that both close and reopen votes expire, each under their own conditions. Could anyone point me to any documentation or discussions/reasoning on why they do? It's not like the person who voted changed their mind, is it? Why does a vote towards closing or reopening a question becomes irrelevant?

The research:

Here are the questions I went through before asking mine. They discuss various aspects of closing/reopening, but none stated the proposal above in clear. I actually went through more than the ones below, but I didn't list duplicates [of duplicates]:


Specifically, I'm interested in knowing:

  • if this was ever considered/discussed as a feature request
  • any of the pro and against arguments on it

As it turns out from comments, my assumption I got the original voters to change their vote was wrong. I suppose getting people to change their vote is difficult and unlikely to happen, which means my proposal would do more harm than good.

  • I am sure technically this will involve a lot of effort for low gain even if I agree with this especially when it's about Dup Hammer, it's good to notify the Gold Badge Owner as alone he can reopen the question without the need of 5 votes if the edit was indeed good. – Temani Afif Aug 11 '18 at 20:44
  • The two reopen votes were the result of a reopen review – sth Aug 12 '18 at 17:50
  • @sth unfortunately, the 3 who voted to leave it closed seem to be backend oriented and each have a small score on CSS. IMHO they should have refrained from voting. Ask CSS experts of your choosing, they'll probably tell you it's not too broad. It's just a complex issue (niche). All and all, an unfortunate case. I put some effort in outlining what I thought was a system malfunction. The system's reactions was: mistakes do happen, everyone moves on. My conclusion: I wasted my time. It won't happen again. – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 12 '18 at 19:26
  • But you did point out that it wasn't the original users who voted for re-open, even though I thought they might have been. Thank you for that, @sth. – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 12 '18 at 19:28
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For people who curate the site, and thus frequently vote to close questions, such notifications would be a constant nuisance to them. Indeed, it would likely make people hesitant to vote to close, simply because they know they're going to get inbox spam about it.

Generally speaking, curators want to take out the trash; we should make that process as painless as possible.

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    I would really like this feature done for duplicate close by Gold Badge ... sometimes when I close a question, this one get updated and voted to reopen and have a long discussion within the comments section but no one thought to ping me so I get involved on this so I can probably justify my action, add another duplicate or reopen the question. – Temani Afif Aug 11 '18 at 20:49
  • What you call curating I call herding bias. The example question was not modified at all, yet two of the closers voted for re-opening, based on my comment. Which means the voters did not take enough care when they voted for closing. How could we prevent this from happening? – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 11 '18 at 21:08
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    @AndreiGheorghiu 'How could we prevent this from happening?' Do we need to? – Martin James Aug 11 '18 at 21:14
  • @Martin, you seem to suggest closing a question for a reason that is false is... normal on StackOverflow and it's not something that should be addressed. – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 11 '18 at 21:18
  • @AndreiGheorghiu why would you conclude that? If a mistake/error/whatever was made, it got corrected, (I'm certainly not going to weigh in on a css question myself). As for addressing a problem, then you have to justify the efforts required against the other calls on time/effort. Just because a problem exists, it does not mean that any new action should be taken. What do you suggest might be done? – Martin James Aug 11 '18 at 21:25
  • @Martin, I understand how this feature would be a nuisance for heavy duty curators. A possible solution would be to allow heavy duty curators to turn these notifications off. As per "it got corrected", it didn't really. I'm in the privileged position where I got my answer posted before the question was wrongly closed and nobody else can answer it now, even though I convinced two of the closers it was wrongly closed, without modifying the question. It's still closed, I'm still privileged. How did it get "corrected"? – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 11 '18 at 21:30
  • @AndreiGheorghiu OK, I will rephrase 'some corrective action was taken but, so far, was insufficient to reopen the question'. Maybe now that you have raised this issue on meta, it may get reopened.... I will not vote on it myself - I don't have the tech knowledge and I don't agree with 'meta effect'. – Martin James Aug 11 '18 at 21:34
  • @Nicol, I have a hard time understanding how preventing answers on a Stack Overflow question is anyway similar to the concept of taking out the trash. Are you saying the decision to delete it is easier to take once nobody can answer it anymore and the process of reopening is nearly impossible? – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 11 '18 at 21:51
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    @AndreiGheorghiu: "I have a hard time understanding how preventing answers on a Stack Overflow question is anyway similar to the concept of taking out the trash." Questions which are not appropriate for SO should not be answered. They will either attract bad answers (guessing, list answers, etc) or encourage the further asking of inappropriate questions. By closing them, with limit the damage they do. That's why I analogized them with "trash". – Nicol Bolas Aug 11 '18 at 22:34
  • @Nicol... you're not taking it out. You're keeping it. – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 11 '18 at 22:35
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    @AndreiGheorghiu: "How could we prevent this from happening?" We don't need to. Mistakes happen. Sometimes, people are going to close questions that shouldn't be closed. It happens, other people see it and vote to reopen, and everyone moves on. – Nicol Bolas Aug 11 '18 at 22:36
  • @Nicol, it turns out I didn't get the original voters to change their vote, so my proposal might not be that good, after all. In all truth, people are unlikely to admit making a mistake, even if minor and they'll always try to justify their past actions in front of others and in front of themselves. Thank you for your answer and time. – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 12 '18 at 22:11
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    Regarding the question that started this initiative, in my opinion, the outcome of the vote was wrong (technically). It appears people without sufficient knowledge on the relevant technology for that question voted on it. And this is a real thing: I get to review a large number of questions I'm definitely not qualified for and the only thing stopping me from voting on them is my ability to recognize my lack of qualification. I don't have access to sufficient data to assess if this is a serious or minor problem, so I'm not going to do anything about it. – Andrei Gheorghiu Aug 12 '18 at 22:14

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