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According to a recent mod comment, a mod warning is considered to be more serious than a review ban and there is no other way to communicate directly and privately with a user. Apparently, mod warnings stay on the user's record and may be used in determining a suspension.

As a user, this is counter-intuitive because I would expect to receive a warning before being banned. Furthermore, it seems strange to me that there isn't a way for a mod to contact a user without a negative penalty being attached.

I think a "soft" mod message, one that doesn't count against a possible suspension, would be useful. That way mods have the ability to pass on information that is more precise and less punitive than review bans.

To be clear, I am not suggesting that a soft warning be a required part of any process, nor do I think this should be a high-priority feature. I just think it would be a nice tool for mods to have in their kits.

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    They can comment on your questions and answers (even deleted ones) to send you such warnings, AFAICT – Patrice Jul 31 '18 at 15:59
  • @Patrice Which is not a great system if the action the mod wants to talk about (reviews, edits, etc.) aren't related to a post the user made themself. – numaroth Jul 31 '18 at 16:05
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    Moderator contacts are called "Mod Messages" and are just that - messages from the moderators to a specific user. They're not "warnings" and there's no inherent negative implication to them. Could you talk a bit about why you think that all mod messages are damaging to your account history? – Catija Jul 31 '18 at 16:07
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    @Catija you really think there is no Oh my, do we have to contact them again bias when the next Mod Message is being sent to me? Or they must be fed up with dragging me around ... – rene Jul 31 '18 at 16:10
  • @Catija My understanding of the first linked comment in my question was that there was no way for a mod to message a user without a warning and mark against the account being attached. If I misunderstood, I apologize. That would clearly invalidate this request. – numaroth Jul 31 '18 at 16:12
  • @rene Probably depends on the site. I think that the mod message tool could be more broadly used to check in with a user when chat isn't a good option or for reasons other than blatantly negative things. With 26 mods and millions of users, I don't know how likely it is to remember day-to-day what happened with a user, which is why the mod message/context is accessible to mods to review. – Catija Jul 31 '18 at 16:15
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    @numaroth There's a counter that shows how many annotations/suspensions a user has, yes... but, as I mentioned in my previous comment, I would hope that having that number be higher would be a reason to review the history, not to immediately assume "this is a troublesome user"... All of that said, I do agree that in general the moderators I've talked to (mostly outside SO - there's ~550 of them) do feel that mod messages should be saved for serious negative issues - so I don't think your request is way off base, trying to understand the thinking. :) – Catija Jul 31 '18 at 16:19
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    But, in relation to that comment - that's sort of exactly what I'm saying... there's an understanding by mods and users to some extent that mod messages are inherently negative, so understanding why that's the case helps us look at how to address it. The solution to this could be changing the UX but it also could be really working with the users/mods to help them understand that mod messages can be used for non-negative things, provided that they're still related to moderation-only messages. – Catija Jul 31 '18 at 16:21
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    But what's the problem with a mod messages getting recorded? Determining if someone needs suspending is not a light affair and not based on one particular bit of trivia, any recorded history can help to make a better informed decision. So seeing that someone has numerous mod messages sent to them is valuable input, it establishes a pattern. Seeing that there are no or maybe only one mod message is proof of the opposite. Just let it happen, until the moment of suspension the mark is no more than a statistic. – Gimby Jul 31 '18 at 16:29
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It's ... a mark. Rene hit on what could be bad about that in a comment:

you really think there is no Oh my, do we have to contact them again bias

I present to you what moderators see when viewing my account record:

Account Summary Screenshot

Uh oh, contacted eight times?! Better go see what's going on there ...

Account Summary Screenshot Expanded

Oh, that was just Tim & Bill The Lizard doing some science.

It's just an annotation, like the old journal tapes in cash registers. In most cases, you'd select from a template (e.g. sock puppet voting, something else) - just click "something else" so other mods and employees know to go look at the message to see what was happening.

There are very rare cases where you'd want to do this.

We discourage ultimatums, e.g. "If you don't heed this warning .. bad stuff", we encourage any constructive criticism to be in public wherever possible, but there are a handful of times where you know things are going to go better if you pull the person aside. That's not a 'black mark' by any means, but it is something other mods will want to know about if the behavior persists.

But don't think of it as an automatic black mark, the suspension that could result from not intervening soon enough comes much close to that than a message. But remember, once the behavior stops, we don't hold a grudge.

Just use it sparingly, try to think if there's a way you could do it in a comment (even if they later get deleted), and set clear goals for users to course-correct when you contact them.

But a "soft" version of this that doesn't leave any trace ... not the best for distributed teams of mods that tend be active or away depending on their schedule. For the system to work, there always needs to be breadcrumbs, or it's the users that pay the ultimate price. That brings me to my final illustration:

Tim Post As A Pirate

Ay matey, I earned that by messaging a user with a chiding warning a year after they had already been contacted about it, because it wasn't quite clear. So ... don't be me, leave clear annotations with care, and there's no 'stigma' getting in the way of a mod helping a user succeed.

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    It's been a while since I saw Captain Terrible. – Andy Jul 31 '18 at 16:42
  • Harr, he been prisoner in Shog9 Jones' locker, just keeping the fishies and loot company. – Tim Post Jul 31 '18 at 16:45
  • I misunderstood the situation. I thought the negative aspects of a mod message were enforced by the system not simply social. Thank you for clearing up my confusion. – numaroth Jul 31 '18 at 16:45
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    @numaroth I'm pretty sure you'll find traces of Jeff Atwood saying "black mark". Inside secret: That tool used to CC him on every message, and Jeff hates email, so he was pretty vocal about disapproving of most uses of it when it came out (we used to have to use our own email as mods to contact users, not optimal). Anyway, the tool was changed to feed into a digest that CMs check on, which obviated most reluctance to use it, so it's not a huge deal. It never was really a black mark, the black marks were the spots Jeff saw when someone warned a spammer instead of deleting them. – Tim Post Jul 31 '18 at 16:47
  • Oddly enough, if you search the Teacher's Lounge transcripts for "CHILDREN BEING KILLED", you'll turn up the time that I annoyed the heck out of him for sending a warning that should have probably been a more serious action. That's why I said for most cases, you'll want the annotation. – Tim Post Jul 31 '18 at 16:51
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I disagree with this. Moderators don't send messages to users as a form of private messaging. We do it when we need to reach out to you for a reason. This could be something like

Hey, high rep user, your last several posts have been flagged for being really low quality. We've logged out all your sessions because this pattern doesn't look like your previous high quality contributions and we're worried you left yourself logged in somewhere by accident.

to

You're stalking users and no longer welcome.

to

Your 15 person vote ring has been dismantled and you've been banned.

to

You have a history of poor reviews. Previous review bans haven't stopped you, so we're reaching out to let you know that you won't be reviewing for the next year. Please take this time to improve your contributions in other areas of the site.

Yes, a record of all of that contact with a user is kept. But, with this is the reason for the contact.


Now, I assume you want to focus on that last one. Why didn't a user receive a message prior to being review banned? There isn't a reason to do so. A manual review ban can be issued and a comment can be provided indicating exactly what was reviewed incorrectly. This comment is displayed when the user attempts to review again. They are receiving the message that something was done incorrectly.

An example taken from a flag I saw recently:

Review Ban Example

The next time this user goes to perform a review, they will see the message and a link to the incorrect review.

This doesn't appear in the same place (but is still part of user history) as the moderator messages. If a moderator isn't looking, specifically, at review history it'd be easy to miss that a user has had multiple manual reviews.

If anything, I'd like to see this information added to the same area as moderator messages to we can easily see a complete history.


TL;DR: There isn't a "soft warning" needed. Moderators reach out to you directly when our intervention is required. A warning is a warning, regardless of whether or not a suspension accompanies it. A moderator message does not imply a warning and it does not mean you did something wrong.

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