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Many organizations have designed their systems to prevent bad things. Stack Overflow should design a system that either rejects the question on the basis of quality or forces the user to put more effort into the question.

I have read once that a big company has used movie database to train their system for something. I once read that another company designed a system with novels to make something.

There are possibilities for designing a system to find the question that doesn't have sufficient quality or is in terrible condition. Today I read 2 questions, one is -7 downvote and another one is -5. The system will either reject the question on the quality basis or tell the user to make it better.

Some people come from a non-English country -- that is one issue and another issue is some people don't put effort to write a question that is valid or have proper quality.

Using the system we can help the Questioner to improve the question quality, maybe hint them by showing them a question similar to one related to his technical knowledge or give them some ideas to help them better.

What do you guys think of this idea? Will it help Stack Overflow to have some more quality?

marked as duplicate by gnat, il_raffa, Arun Vinoth, peterh, HaveNoDisplayName Jul 27 '18 at 17:56

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    What makes you think this isn't already being done. – Martijn Pieters Jul 27 '18 at 12:26
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    I think everyone here would love a system that would reliably autodetect all the bad questions. Seeems pretty hard to get done though. – Sebastian Proske Jul 27 '18 at 12:26
  • See, for example, the central FAQ on our quality filter system: What can I do when getting “It does not meet our quality standards”? – Martijn Pieters Jul 27 '18 at 12:28
  • The amount of AI code dedicated to the Ask Question page is rather low. It doesn't go much beyond preventing questioners from using the word "problem" in the question title and preventing them from posting a wall-of-code without text. It is just not in the company's interest to ratchet this up, they want to be the Google of Q+A and Google never minds poor questions. And isn't snarky about it. They leave it up to the users to deal with it, when you look at a -7 question then you get what you'd expect. – Hans Passant Jul 27 '18 at 12:37
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    Why does this question make me think of the original Robocop movie? A machine which was still human worked quite okay to uphold the law, the fully automated ones just wanted to murder everyone. – Gimby Jul 27 '18 at 12:48
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    the fact that you were able to see questions you mentioned makes me suspect that limited visibility of triaged questions somehow fails to work as intended – gnat Jul 27 '18 at 14:14
  • @gnat A possible cause can be that as the mean quality grows, so will be the users more sensitive against the few LQ posts. I've just looked at the SO main page, and the overwhelming majority of the posts had a tolerable niveau. – peterh Jul 27 '18 at 17:30
  • @peterh main page is very heavily filtered: triaged questions are hidden (about 20% of all new questions), questions with score lower than -3 are hidden either – gnat Jul 27 '18 at 17:44
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    I would suggest, if interested, to try to attempt to make this tool and then apply it to the public API to test for false positive low quality hits. That would hopefully lend itself towards realizing the many issues with an automated solution. Statistics ("AI") are sometimes useful for interpretation, but they are a far cry from an actual person. – Travis J Jul 27 '18 at 19:04
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This is already being done, posts are subject to automated quality filters when you post.

See the help center article on the error message people will encounter when their post fails to pass the filter. Also see the central Meta FAQ on the same subject.

Our next line of defence is our community, which have both voting and voting-to-close at their disposal to handle questions that managed to pass the automated quality filters but still fall short of the mark. Not everything can be tested with automation, after all.

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