2

I just answered a Stack Overflow question which is in my opinion a really good question that could help a lot of future beginners to Python.

Now, I particularly like the questioning process of OP since it is something I took a lot of time searching and understanding when I first started using Python.

Basically I think the question is good, but wrongly asked.

So I wanted to know, how can I handle this case?

I feel like editing his entire question seems like bad practice and could lead to OP thinking I'm hijacking his question. So, a solution that I thought of was to make a question with better wording and close it as duplicate to the question I linked.

Would that be OK or there is a better way of handling theses kinds of situations?

EDIT

Just to be clear, I'm not trying to start a debate on if this question is good or not. Maybe I was wrong to think it was wrongly worded. But, I still think that my question still apply for other cases where a simple edit seems like not being enough.

EDIT 2

So far, a correct using of the comments section seems to be favored. As @Tensibai proposed, a good option is to edit the question (as 2k+ it's a direct edit) and comment to let the author know he/she can roll back the edit if they don't like it. (which worked great in my specific situation).

  • I'm no python guy but that looks fine as it is to me. – Tiny Giant Jul 19 '18 at 14:32
  • @TinyGiant Yea, I added an edit. I agree that is maybe the result of my own opinion. But opinions asides, how should I handle a question that I consider good but wrongly worded but where a simple edit is not enough? Should I just open another thread or edit the entire thing? or maybe something else. – scharette Jul 19 '18 at 14:35
  • Well that really depends on the post and the edit. – Tiny Giant Jul 19 '18 at 14:38
  • 2
    I'd comment asking the OP "Do you want to know why methods defining order does not matter in classes..." then edit the question based on their response. – George Jul 19 '18 at 14:38
  • 1
    @George I will try that. I guess I,ll just try to approve any changes I would make and let him do it. that way I'm sure he agrees. – scharette Jul 19 '18 at 14:42
  • 1
    Sometimes a good option is to edit the question (as 2k+ it's a direct edit) and comment to let the author know he/she can roll back the edit if they don't like it. – Tensibai Jul 20 '18 at 9:03
  • @Tensibai Yea I honestly never used the comments section to notify an OP of an edit before. I did in this case and it worked. it seems like a nice way to handle these cases. – scharette Jul 20 '18 at 13:05
  • @scharette I sometimes do that when I reword a lot of the question when it's unclear and I think I understood the problem? That's so the OP knows I just tried to improve the question and don't feel his/her question has been hijacked :) – Tensibai Jul 20 '18 at 13:06
  • @Tensibai Yea, that was exactly my concerns. I was going to change the title and the most part of his question's body. I felt like doing this was basically taking his answer. – scharette Jul 20 '18 at 13:08

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .