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I occasionally see a bad answer that has bad advice (and often comments to that effect) but then the author of the answer inserts an Edit: _good advice here_. How do I vote on such an answer?

The answer consists of a poor / inefficient method spelt out in detail, then a one-liner with the best solution edited (by the author of the original answer).

The answer structurally looks like this:

Edit: This answer is 7 years old. You should do good things now.

Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things.

I think it would be better to provide a second answer with the good advice, so that the bad advice can be downvoted and the good advice upvoted separately. It's not clear what a vote for this answer actually means. It's not clear if someone is supporting the old answer or the new edit.

I think the motivation for the answerer to construct this duality is that you need the context of the bad advice to appreciate the good advice, so both the bad-old advice and the good-new advice are stated in the answer.

My current thinking is to downvote this kind of two-sided answer, largely by virtue of its duality and that it wasn't edited to say "don't do bad things". What else can I do about it? Should I ask them to write a second answer with only the good stuff? Should I ask them to remove the bad stuff from their answer and risk potentially losing some context? I just can't bring myself to upvote this kind of "two-faced" answer even though the advice in the edit is perfectly good.

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    Did the author himself edit the question, or was it a different editor? You can always ask the author to split up the question, but you can't be certain if and how he responds. – Erik A Jul 4 '18 at 21:43
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    I've seen this before. A poor / inefficient method spelt out in detail, then a one-liner with the best solution edited in. A good answer is code/description plus explanation. First try commenting to ask answerer to reverse the priority. If this doesn't work, downvote, write a better answer including only the good stuff with full explanation, and trust over time the best solution gets upvoted. – jpp Jul 4 '18 at 21:44
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    The right thing to do depends on how the answer is written. Whether it feels more like instructions on how you could do something (whether or not it's a good thing to do) or advice to actually do that thing. Whether it's the kind of answer that nobody's going to be misled by unless they're the kind of person who just copies and pastes code while refusing to read the text, or the kind of answer that would mislead a lot of readers. And so on. – abarnert Jul 5 '18 at 0:20
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    Answers rarely get voted on after a week or so. I know that SO is supposed to work that way, but it does not. Obsolete answers does not disappear. Therefore, I fully support this kind of editing. – klutt Jul 5 '18 at 10:55
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    Yes, the author of the answer edited their own answer (the question is not edited in this scenario.) – Wyck Jul 5 '18 at 12:50
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    @jpp, your comment of A poor / inefficient method spelt out in detail, then a one-liner with the best solution edited in is exactly what I meant. That's a great description of the scenario I'm concerned with. I'd like to include that clarification in my question. – Wyck Jul 5 '18 at 13:01
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    I've seen this problem quite often. The only way to fix this is to reformat your hard drive and take your computer back to the store for a refund. EDIT: This comment is out of date, instead I'd recommend leaving a comment for the author or maybe posting a new answer (especially if the answer was in the form "bad answer EDIT: here's a link to a good answer" which I see from time to time). Occasionally suggested edits can work but it's kind of a tossup. – jrh Jul 5 '18 at 20:27
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The primary goal is to have a good answer, useful for the community as future reference. More precisely, what we would like to see first in the top of the answer is the good solution.

So in the situation described by @Wyck, or in such a situation (seen very often too):

Do bad things. Do bad things.
Do bad things. Do bad things.

Edit: This answer is 7 years old. You should do good things now.

then I might try to do this (maybe it would be discouraged because some people don't like their own answers to be modified by other people, but finally if we focus mainly about having a good answer and respect the following point 3., I think it should be ok):

  1. Edit the answer (even if it's not your answer) into something like:

    Do good things. Do good things.
    Do good things. Do good things.

    Remark: An obsolete way of doing this is:
    Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things.

    or, even, in some rare cases (after OP's consent after having asked him in a comment):

    Do good things. Do good things.
    Do good things. Do good things.

    Remark: An obsolete way of doing this is available [here](link to previous edit).

  2. Add a relevant edit comment: "I moved the old deprecated solution as remark at the end of answer and moved the good solution on top".

  3. Do nothing else than basically moving the good solution on top / old bad solution on bottom, so that nobody can reproach you to put words in OP's mouth.

Why do this? Because what is finally useful as an answer is the good answer. The old bad solution is maybe interesting as an appendix / side-remark, for historical reasons, etc. but its place is no longer on top.

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    While I think is is okay IF you are editting one of your own answers, I do not think it would be okay to do this to other user's answers. In that scenario, you should probably just comment on the answerer's post to tell them that their answer has become a bad practice now. – Tyler Jul 5 '18 at 13:46
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    If you carefully follow point 3. mentioned here, I think it could be ok. If OP doesn't like it he can rollback anyway. – Basj Jul 5 '18 at 13:47
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    Also having the "bad old solution" first in an answer is really really noisy usually, and annoying to read. What we want to read first is the good solution, and all the rest (a previous bad solution, or an obsolete method, etc.) only after. – Basj Jul 5 '18 at 13:49
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    But... You are kinda hi-jacking another user's answer. To add a completely new solution and say the old one is obsolete should either be done by the original answer-er, or by adding a entirely new answer. You can alert the original answer-er of the situation through comments. – Tyler Jul 5 '18 at 13:52
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    Why "hijacking", @Tyler, if you carefully follow point 3? It's possible to edit someone else's answer for this reason (to improve it), no? – Basj Jul 5 '18 at 13:55
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    If it's a simple edit like that; then yes; but, it sounds like you believe it is fine to also directly add a completely different solution to another user's answer. – Tyler Jul 5 '18 at 13:57
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    Not at all @Tyler, I only spoke about changing the layout of the answer so that the useful is on top (the good part of the answer), and the noise on bottom (old part of the answer Do bad things. Do bad things. Do bad things.). Of course one should not add a different solution to another user's answer; in this case one should do a new answer instead. – Basj Jul 5 '18 at 13:59
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    Alright, it seems I had some confusion. – Tyler Jul 5 '18 at 14:00
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    Edit: This answer is now 6 hours old. You should do this instead. – Davy M went to fund Monica Jul 5 '18 at 20:17
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Just post a comment on the answer, explaining that it is partially wrong or outdated, and include a link to a better answer.

If needed, you can also post a new correct answer.

But I would not recommend editing someone else's answer to "fix" the advice in it. A question or answer belongs to whoever posted it. Any edits should preserve the author's intent.

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