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I recently made a suggested edit to fix code in an answer that did not work.

The edit was rejected by other members because they said edits should only touch format or spelling. They said that the original author should be contacted in a comment to explain why the code is wrong and make suggestions in that manner.

The original author noticed my suggested edit after it was rejected and approved it. But I'm confused by the experience.

This post includes suggestions for how to edit code in questions and answers, but not on the topic of bugs.

Should I make an edit to fix a bug in an answer? Or leave a comment on the answer for the original author? I think making an edit makes sense, since it will be reviewed by the community rather than waiting on an original answer author to review a comment.

marked as duplicate by Stephen Rauch, Michael Gaskill, Code Lღver, il_raffa, Adam Kipnis Jul 2 '18 at 13:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    In this case the author agreed and and fixed it, great, a comment would have achieved that as well. But there might be elements you are not aware of (anything from library versions, different environments etc) that comes into play that actually makes that edit wrong, or conflicting with the authors intentions. That is why such suggestions tend to be rejected and should be avoided. You should leave a comment (or a new answer). Edits should not change the intention of the post and "fixing" code does just that. – ivarni Jul 1 '18 at 18:54
  • @ivarni If this is not a duplicate, I would like to see your comment as an answer. So that linking to this, e.g. for rejecting edits is helpful. I already consider it a good answer, but if you appreciate an idea, try to quote from some appropriate help text or some other discussion you are deriving from. – Yunnosch Jul 1 '18 at 20:16
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    Hmm, that edit wasn't rejected. For a post that has been around for 6 years and reviewed by eighteen thousands programmers you have to be at least 314.16% sure that the edit is correct. Reviewers are never that sure. You were just lucky that the post owner gave the tie-breaker vote, not actually that common. – Hans Passant Jul 1 '18 at 20:23
  • @Yunnosch If you want to see it as an answer then feel free to post it as one. The SO license allows it. I'm voicing an opinion based on frequently lurking meta threads and reading answers to to similar questions posted here before. – ivarni Jul 2 '18 at 6:26
  • @ivarni Thanks for the permission. However, I kind of knew that there would be a good dupe somewhere. Would have taken you at your word otherwise. – Yunnosch Jul 2 '18 at 14:48

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