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The tag has only one question, no usage guidance and no tag wiki. IMO, the tag doesn't add anything valuable to the post and the site in general.

Also refer to a related question about the tag: Should we roll back 62 edits where [russian] was added?

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    For the record, I was the one to create the tag, based on japanese. And I did attempt to add usage guidance, but it wasn't approved. – Cœur Jun 29 '18 at 10:06
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    Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/370313/… – Cœur Jun 29 '18 at 11:07
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    If a tag has but one question, removing the tag from that question leads to the tag being removed automatically within 24 hours. Replacing the tag with a more appropriate one (cjk judging from the answer) makes it a no-brainer and the deletion will be automatic and doesn't need to involve "burnination". Burnination is far too heavy-weight a process for a tag with but one question. Arguably, it is best if someone with 2K+ reputation does the edit — that saves troubling the review queues. – Jonathan Leffler Jun 29 '18 at 15:29
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    For that small of tags, you don't need to ask Meta. For under 50 questions, you can burn the tag if you understand the topics involved and get buy-in from a 20k+ user. – EJoshuaS Jun 29 '18 at 15:32
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Since we already have , which is a tag with 42 questions, of which 5 mention korean as a language, and since it's only one question, I've retagged that question.

I don't see this as a burninate, just increasing findability by moving it to a more frequently used tag.

Link to the question, to make rollbacks possible if people disagree with my approach


Edit: As suggested by kaiido, I've moved the question to , which is a better fit since it's specific to Chinese, Japanese and Korean, while focusses on another distinct set of Asian languages

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    I have serious doubts that question is on-topic to begin with as it appears to be missing crucial information to reproduce the problem. Voted to close accordingly. – Baum mit Augen Jun 28 '18 at 12:35
  • Good idea to retag the post (despite the fact that it may be off-topic). But it feels not right to me to leave the tag alive (especially in it's current state), maybe add it as a synonym of southeast-asian-languages? – Filnor Jun 28 '18 at 12:40
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    @Filnor Any tag with 0 questions will automatically get destroyed after a day. Thus the tag won't be alive anymore soon. – Erik A Jun 28 '18 at 12:41
  • @ErikvonAsmuth Nice, I didn't know that. In that case, we should be fine. – Filnor Jun 28 '18 at 12:43
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    Isn't [cjk] a better target though? 571 question as of now. [southeast-asian-languages] seems to focus more on "Burmese (Myanmar), Khmer (Cambodian), Lao, Thai, and Vietnamese" – Kaiido Jun 29 '18 at 7:31
  • @Kaiido It's certainly a better target. I wasn't aware of that abbreviation, which made the tag hard to find for me. I've moved the question to it. For merging, I suggest you open up a separate discussion. – Erik A Jun 29 '18 at 7:35
  • No actually, I was wrong, merging is not a good idea. cjk is really only for Chinese Korean and Japanese (with their own variants) while [southeast-asian-languages] tag seems to focus on other languages. But I am more concerned about your answer's content, if someone comes here wanting to create the [korean] tag, they should rather be redirected to [cjk] – Kaiido Jun 29 '18 at 7:37
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    As stated in my above comment on this question, I originally made the tag korean to match japanese, and there was usage guidance pending approval prior to this meta question, but it got invalidated by the destruction of the tag after your retagging. Now, I wonder if we should make japanese (and korean and chinese) synonyms of cjk to avoid this in the future. – Cœur Jun 29 '18 at 10:16
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    @Cœur That sounds like a good plan, since that also makes cjk a little more findable, now it's just 3 pseudorandom letters. I would certainly support that if you open up a post. – Erik A Jun 29 '18 at 10:38
  • My synonym request: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/370313/… – Cœur Jun 29 '18 at 10:51
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    For people who work with mulitbyte character [cjk] is a standard acronym. Since Korea is not in Southeast Asia it wouldn't make sense to add it there. Those languages have their own special issues. – Elin Jun 29 '18 at 17:44

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