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This is relating to the "StackOverflow is unwelcoming" debate going on.

Someone on this question within meta.stackexchange said:

[I]n the end it boils down to the quality of the post, not the poster. And I'm not saying "discrimination never happens on the basis of the poster being in a marginalized group", but downvotes are rarely cast because of the poster being who they are. In my opinion, the hostility some people experience isn't because they're a part of a marginalized group, but more because of post quality.

If it is not down to the poster being new, female, or of any other marginalised group, I feel that some things need to be sorted out and this is one of them.

One thing which newbies and "relative newbies" seem to have a problem with is how to provide a "good quality" question. What constitutes a "good quality" or "high quality" question?

Let's put this into context

What would a newbie consider to be a "post of good quality"? A question which outlines with enough detail what they are after? This is how I started. Plus I was new to the kind of coding I was posting about when I was made to feel my question was invalid.

As an example, one of my very early questions posted on Stack Overflow (and I was new to Stack Exchange too) was Using PHP, how do I link a page and load it with a variable when clicked? which received two downvotes with to my mind no valid reason given in comments. The first comment was a sarcastic:

"Yes, this is certainly possible."

and then there was a comment following that stating:

This question is off-topic because it is asking about possibilities and is not a concrete coding question. If you want to know if something is possible you should research it and attempt to implement it

This comment was upvoted six times and I was confused. I asked a coding question and it was a valid question which I did try to research without any real way of indicating that I did.

Thankfully I got an answer but not without feeling that I am not welcome as a newbie, especially seeing others being lambasted for falling foul of standards which seem unclear to those new here, and elitism felt was shown in my comment afterwards thanking the answerer.

Isn't it interesting that we get responses like this when the person responding has a reputation figure which is astronomical to the point that they feel that they can run those learning the fine art of coding down. How do you know I haven't tried researching? I knew that the coding I had in my head was not going to work so I put the question out there after I couldn't find out elsewhere. Thankfully we have people like @mareckmareck who is willing to help.

Even though I am now a more seasoned Stack Exchange member, and although I have posted three questions on Stack Overflow this year (the first one being the first for three years) I am still a bit apprehensive of asking more questions in Stack Overflow. I have to really struggle first and it isn't a nice feeling.

Since posting about this in the same meta.stackexchange question linked above, I got a further two downvotes and the question cannot be deleted because it was answered. In case any more downvotes come my way, at the time of writing this I now have a score of -4!!!! A bit heavy handed on the downvotes is it not?

It seems that questions relating to complicated scripts of code are upvoted a lot and when a basic question is asked by someone, it is downvoted and considered invalid, even though someone else who is new to coding may find that question helpful.

So what is the answer? Can basic coding questions be considered "good enough" for Stack Overflow? If so,

How do we make a basic question "good quality" or even better, "high quality"?

  • 2
    Being fit for purpose, in the context of SO, is being useful to future SO users/visitors. – Martin James Jun 23 '18 at 8:04
  • I have just seen that I have 2 downvotes now on this again with no comment for explanation. As for @MartinJames' comment, that is my point. I asked a question which would be useful for future SO users/visitors so why was my question and this one downvoted? I give up on this. It is obvious to me that this site has members who are hell bent on sabotaging others who are trying to learn – Chris Rogers Jun 23 '18 at 8:09
  • Maybe you should first understand the meaning of downvotes on the Meta site before complaining about them. – Temani Afif Jun 23 '18 at 8:20
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    'It is obvious to me that this site has members who are hell bent on sabotaging others who are trying to learn' oh? Why would they do that? What benefit would they get from such malicious actions? Sorry, but it doesn't sound likely to me, or Mr Occam. Almost everyone who visits SO is trying to learn something, at some level, it's just that many, many 'basic' questions already have many. many answers on SO, and elsewhere, already, and so have insufficient value as a new SO question. – Martin James Jun 23 '18 at 8:26
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    'I asked a question which would be useful for future SO users/visitors' well, maybe so, but your opinion is not the one that matters - you have to convince other users that is the case, (note - I have not voted at all on your main site Q - I try to avoid PHP at all costs:). – Martin James Jun 23 '18 at 8:28
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    "The first comment was sarcastic": Since you ask "is it possible to have the name of that item passed to another page through the hyperlink?" why is saying "Yes, it is possible" sarcastic? It's not very helpful and might be unnecessary, but that's as much the fault of the question as of the comment. – BDL Jun 23 '18 at 9:30
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    Set realistic goals. You can't get to writing high quality questions until you learn to get them average. Which in general doesn't take more than knowing how to avoid them sucking badly. Average is good enough. If after 4 years you still can't see why that question was bad then good advice is very hard to give. You'd have to consider that the "show me the page in the cookbook and I'll bake the souffle from there" approach is not working. – Hans Passant Jun 23 '18 at 12:45
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    Downvotes are not unwelcoming. – user202729 Jun 25 '18 at 14:19
  • SO isn't for learning. If one tries to use it for learning, they're going to have a bad time. Like you had/are having. If you (or folks in general) want to learn PHP, you should go on Amazon and buy a couple books on learning PHP. Do a search, sort by reviews, and buy the top two. Read them (usually takes a day or so). After this, you should be past the "is it possible to" and are able to create a small prototype to actually attempt what you want to accomplish. If you are having problems with it, you can use the code to show what you want, what you attempted, and why it didn't work for you. – Will Jun 25 '18 at 14:50
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As an example, one of my very early questions posted on StackOverflow (and I was new to StackExchange too) was Using PHP, how do I link a page and load it with a variable when clicked? which got 2 downvotes

Personally, I find that that Q&A is not useful at all. It is very, very, very hard to start learning to do web development with PHP without bumping head first with the "information" you get in that Q&A..

Someone who truly needed that information and was looking for that this way, would not find it by reading the linked question or its answer. And to write a "useful" answer, you'd have to write the first page of a PHP tutorial, which for me it is a strong sign that the question should probably be closed as "too broad".

As such, I am not surprised some users decided to down-vote the question. It is not a matter of being "basic", but simply a matter of not being a good question which in turn doesn't facilitate good answers.

The question is not "not useful" because it is basic, but because it doesn't elicit the posting of informative answers that could be useful for users looking for that information. At most, it prompts posting of blog articles explaining the basics of web-development with PHP, and there are already countless sites for that.

with to my mind no valid reason given in comments. The first comment was a sarcastic

It's a shame about that first comment. You can always flag those as "no longer needed", since the bring nothing useful to the post.

But it seems that you expect other users having to bring up "valid reasons" for voting, and that is not the case.

Users vote anonymously, and do not need to justify their votes. Up or down. Justifying votes is even discouraged more often than not, since it usually brings no benefit and can even some times trigger unpleasant situations.

As an example of the first case ("brings no benefit"), let me point you to the other comment you got:

This question is off-topic because it is asking about possibilities and is not a concrete coding question. If you want to know if something is possible you should research it and attempt to implement it

You say you received no explanation for the downvotes, yet you have this comment which was upvoted multiple times.

It wouldn't surprise me if a couple of the users who upvoted that comment also voted on your question.

So you did get feedback, but you chose to dismiss it because you disagree with it (which is what usually happens when users explain their downvotes; and one of the reasons is generally useless or detrimental trying to explain down-votes).

Since posting about this in the same meta.stackexchange question linked above, I got a further 2 downvotes and the question cannot be deleted because it was answered. In case any more downvotes come my way, at the time of writing this I now have a score of -4!!!! A bit heavy handed on the downvotes is it not?

This is what is known as the "meta effect". Users who frequent the different meta sites tend to be a bit more quality conscious than the average Stack Overflow user.

If a question is exposed to additional traffic composed mainly of meta users, it will probably receive additional votes. Many times this is detrimental to question score, since a pool of very demanding users wont always find the question up to scratch.

Also, the score does not necessarily reflect how good or bad a question is. A score is of -X is not "heavy handed" because the question is "not that bad". The score will always in part reflect the amount of views a question got. When a user votes, ideally they should vote thinking only about the content, not about the score of the question.

So if you come upon a post you find useful and well-researched, you should up-vote despite it already having received hundred of up-votes previously. Logically, the opposite is true as well.

Finally, you begin your question with:

This is relating to the "StackOverflow is unwelcoming" debate going on.

I do not see how this relates in any way with the debate. Unless your whole post is about that first comment you've got, although it doesn't seem the case.

You've posted a question, years ago, and it got down-votes. That's not being "elitist". You can ask a very basic question in almost any tag and get up-voted. Sometimes is the luck of the draw. Sometimes basic questions are useful questions.

In the case of the question you bring up for debate, I do not think it is good or useful, and I am not completely surprised that other users decided to down-vote it.

When receiving down-votes, in a community like this, I think it is better to try to think on which ways the post doesn't live up to the site's standards, and accept and embrace criticism, instead of fighting it.

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How do we make a basic question "good quality" or even better, "high quality"?

If it's a basic question, you cannot 'make' it non-basic. For it to be considered very useful by other SO users, and so upvoted/answered instead of downvoted/duped/closed, those users have to see it as new, relevant, interesting and so worth handling in a positive manner.

It's not impossible, but it's very difficult, to find such questions. If an answer can be found by a trivial Google, an SO search, in tag FAQ, in a 'Computers 101' course or in a 'C++ for Dummies' book/site, then many users will consider the question as having negative net worth for future visitors - it's noise that is drowning out better questions, and will likely downvote it:(

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Asking a good question is, at its core, about your approach to both learning and problem solving.

One problem I see, particularly among new programmers, is that when they encounter a new language or system or whatever, they're not particularly interested in learning about it. They encountered that language because they want to do a particular thing. So when they go searching for information about it, they're focused entirely on "stuff that helps me do my particular thing". They're not interested in learning how a system works, only in how it can be manipulated to do the thing they're blocked on.

So when they do research, it's with a giant filter over their eyes. Every sentence is consumed, not to learn what it's trying to say, but to fit a pattern. If it clearly and obviously applies to their problem at hand, then the sentence is absorbed. If not, it is rejected.

I've sent dozens of people to read pages on the OpenGL Wiki as a way to help them learn what they're doing wrong, and in most cases it never helps. Why? Because they're getting a detailed explanation of how some part of the system works, which when applied to their problem will show them what they're doing wrong. But they don't want to understand OpenGL; they want someone to say "You did X on line 30; you should do Y instead." They don't care why X is wrong and Y is right; they just want to be given Y and be told where to put it.

This is not an effective way to learn anything.

I don't know anything about PHP, but from the answer provided, it seems clear that what you asked about is as fundamental to PHP web development as passing arguments to functions is to C or C++. It sounds like the sort of thing that any PHP web tutorial or book would have taught you by the 3rd chapter or so.

Which means that, at the end of the day, this question is useful to just yourself and others who didn't take the time to learn the way this system works.

When people talk about "lacking research," this is the kind of thing they're talking about. Research is not "I typed my question title into Google and didn't find an answer". Research is about making a good-faith effort to try to understand the system you're working with. To learn its idioms and particulars based on existing information. And then to apply that learning to the problem you currently have.

You come to Stack Overflow only after all of that genuinely fails to present a solution. And there's basically no way you put that effort in before asking that question.

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