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A 14 days trial is typical to test and walk through an application, but in my opinion, it is too short for Stack Overflow teams which are about knowledge sharing and involve multiple users. This is because it takes time to build knowledge base as well, even if it's small and for test purposes that multiple users can check out.

Why not bump the trial period to three months?

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    An entire quarter seems like a long time to support non-paying users. – BSMP Jun 20 '18 at 18:01
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    I think people are voting to close your question because of how it is phrased. While you are attempting to make a FR ("extend the trial period"), instead of proposing that and making your case; you are asking "why 14 days". Maybe you should re-write the question to make it clearer. – yivi Jun 20 '18 at 18:26
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    3 months sounds like too much, but 30 days would be reasonable, so +1 if not for the exact suggestion. Many many reasons for a team not to be able to get started within fourteen. That said, I'm sure there is a chance you can get an extension if you give the team a good reason – Pekka Jun 20 '18 at 19:18
  • @yivi I rephrased the question but I feel like 14 days is bare minimum for any software trial. For example RoboHelp has 30 days trial. Perforce used to be FREE for a workforce of 20 users. and under 20 workspaces. – zar Jun 20 '18 at 22:06
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    Three months Trial? Stack Overflow isn't a non-profit organization. – I am the Most Stupid Person Jun 21 '18 at 5:11
  • My ~100 person company was considering SO Teams recently. We reached out to their sales team to start a trial, but the last comment I see about the project was "their sales won't give me the time of day". I'm kinda bummed, but I'm guessing larger enterprise customers are what matters to SO? In any case, half of the 14 days may be eaten up trying to integrate with a SSO provider, coming up with some policies for use, and trying to roll it out to a large-ish team. – Nick T Apr 11 '19 at 1:43
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I've been a member on two Teams so far... I'm sure there's some stats about it around somewhere... but actually, amazingly, I've found that most of the activity (on both Teams) occurred within the first week of use.

That week was a flurry of questions and answers that people had been sitting on and thinking about and were finally able to have a place to put them down and document them... or migrating FAQs from other documentation to the Team. It was great and magical and fun... but tiring! A lot of work to get started but really ended up with a nice result.

After that, it settled into more stable use with fewer regular questions and answers. Not no use... the content is still being used and voted on over time and getting new answers and questions about different things but not nearly as much use as in that first big week of excitement.

As such, I think that two weeks is actually a good amount of time to learn how it works and actually use it to try out.

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While it is hard to say the rationality of others, the probable reason is this: that 14 day is obviously too few to create an useful team, but it is enough to learn everything there.

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