22

When browsing jobs where the salary range is provided in kroner (for at least Danish, Swedish and Norwegian jobs), the salary is written as e.g. "kr480k - 600k". This is because "kr" is used as the currency symbol instead of e.g. € or $.

But the correct way to write the currency would be "kr. 480k - 600k" or "480k - 600k kr.".

Here are two suggested fixes:

  1. Change the currency into "kr. " (notice the period and the space).

  2. Change the currency into "DKK " for Danish kroner, "NOK " for Norwegian kroner, and "SEK " for Swedish kroner, since they're separate currencies. Companies may be Swedish but have Danish offices, and it wouldn't be obvious what currency is implied. (The less formal "sek" and "dkr" could also be used, but it's probably less obvious to foreigners what that means. Also, as a non-Scandinavian, wanting to google the exchange rate is by far simpler if you know the actual name of the currency.)

Edit 2PM: Added second suggestion based on @Lundin's side note.

The attached screenshot contains one place where "kr480k - 600k" is used and one place where "€40k - 55k" is used.

Screenshot of job description; emphasis on "kr480k - 600k"

  • Several kinds of kroner. Use DKK for Danish kroner – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jun 10 '18 at 7:39
  • Was just going to make a post about this with this very job opening as an example. The salary was so sweet, I was really curious if it was DKK too! – Chris Jul 2 '18 at 11:43
4

We now use three-letter currency codes for kroner (Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Icelandic), across the board.

Big thanks to everyone for discussing this in such depth. Based on the analysis presented here, we've decided to go with the solution proposed by Ludin.

DKK Denmark

SEK Sweden

NOK Norway

ISK Iceland


Examples

On job search

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On job details pages

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On job ads

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  • 1
    Why not use the 3 letter codes for all currencies? (Joe can give you guys some tips on standardizing across the board ;p) – Bhargav Rao Sep 6 '18 at 18:39
  • @BhargavRao For convenience, mostly. In a lot of cases, using symbols instead of three-letter codes is user-friendly and unambiguous. For other cases, we fallback to three-letter currency codes. – Aurélien Gasser Sep 6 '18 at 18:41
  • That's how it should be, thanks for that! – Bhargav Rao Sep 6 '18 at 18:42
15

The grammatically correct way would rather be 480k - 600k kr. The krona currency in all the nordic countries is always written after the digits, not before them as in US dollar $480k.

As a side note, in Sweden the term "SEK" is more common for professional use, meaning "Swedish krona". Just to avoid confusion with Danish and Norwegian currencies. If I would apply to a Danish job from Sweden, I wouldn't know if the site showed Swedish or Danish krona.

The best idea seems to be changing to:

DKK Denmark
SEK Sweden
NOK Norway
ISK Iceland

  • 2
    That's uppercase SEK, though, no? I've never seen it written in lowercase (but then I'm not Swedish). – Pekka 웃 Jun 7 '18 at 11:30
  • 2
    @Lundin: Thank you for clarifying that. On a similar note, yes, "kr." is unclear when there are three currencies. What if you're applying for a job at a Swedish company in Denmark; is that SEK or DKK? In Danish, the currency is not always listed after the digits. It is more formal to write it before, and both are valid. Since the site is not translated, I would not expect for this to be grammatically correct Danish/Swedish/Norwegian, but for the currency to be correct. Having "DKK ", "SEK ", "NOK " instead of "kr" is probably a better idea. – Simon Shine Jun 7 '18 at 11:54
  • 1
    Hey this currency stuff is all awfully complicated. How about you guys just ditch your kronor and i.imgflip.com/2bs87x.jpg? – Pekka 웃 Jun 7 '18 at 12:42
  • @Pekka웃 Yeah usually upper case (damn them pedantic programmers). – Lundin Jun 7 '18 at 13:06
  • 6
    RL anecdote: I once bought some exclusive whisky at a very nice price at the Danish Kastrup airport. Then later when I checked by bank account, I realized I had paid almost 1.5 times the price because my brain was thinking Swedish krona, but I paid in Danish krona. – Lundin Jun 7 '18 at 13:10
  • 6
    On a site with an international IT-literate readership, I think it would be perfectly reasonable to use ISO 4217 currency codes (iso.org/iso-4217-currency-codes.html) just as you would naturally use ISO 8601 date formats. That means SEK or DKK. You might make an exception for US dollars because many American readers are clueless about internationalization (many have never used a currency other than dollars in their entire lives). – Michael Kay Jun 8 '18 at 6:57
  • The use of "kr" before digits is common in Norway. Especially when displaying prices for food. This is a good example: kolonial.no/kategorier/20-frukt-og-gront – Mataunited18 Jun 8 '18 at 13:28
  • @Mataunited17 Similarly in Sweden, the food store will type "kr" after the digits. But that's just for the dumb masses :) Professional/business use will be NOK and SEK respectively. – Lundin Jun 8 '18 at 13:33
  • @MichaelKay I'll have you know most Americans have used Canadian money before. Some of the times we even notice our change was given in the foreign coins. – Dan Neely Jun 8 '18 at 14:09
  • @DanNeely My "many don't" is actually consistent with your "most do". But neither of us have any data, so it's not worth trading anecdotes. – Michael Kay Jun 8 '18 at 14:53
  • 2
    @MichaelKay I'd probably do the same in your shoes. My comment was more in the way of a joke. Canadian 1/5/10/25 cent coins are virtually identical in size and close enough in appearance to their US equivalents that they float around in circulation in small numbers largely unnoticed. – Dan Neely Jun 8 '18 at 14:56

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