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Reading a question, which may be good or bad, I wanted to discss it with the user who closed it. And after explaining my point of view I got kicked out of the forum within a few comments with this message:

I really don't want to discuss this with some random user as soon as I get into the room in the morning. You've misread the question.

Full conversation.

I do not know if it's tolerated in Stack Overflow but I find it very awkward, against the new Code of Conduct, as well as putting down someone asking for discussing a question closure where he was trying to help.

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    That question was not closed by a moderator, it was closed by a regular user. Said user is not obligated to discuss a question with you in chat if they don't want to. – Servy Jun 6 '18 at 13:47
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    Sigh, expert gold badgers get harassed about their decisions everywhere. Clearly you didn't make it convincing enough to change his mind, get ahead by editing the question. – Hans Passant Jun 6 '18 at 13:55
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    @Marine1 You're the only one who's acted inappropriately here. There's nothing at all wrong with someone saying they aren't interested in discussing the question with you in a chatroom. – Servy Jun 6 '18 at 13:58
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    @Marine1 I don't know the rules of that room but if I disagree with a closure I leave a comment under the question itself. Is there a specific reason you pinged them on chat, instead of the main site? – ayhan Jun 6 '18 at 14:01
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    @Marine1 You can ask to discuss it with him, sure. But you can't force him to discuss it with you if he doesn't want to, or call him rude for politely telling you that he disagrees with you and doesn't wish to discuss it further. – Servy Jun 6 '18 at 14:02
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    @Marine1 Either that user has changed their profile or you have misread it. It currently only states: "Come join us in the sopython chatroom!" – André Kool Jun 6 '18 at 14:07
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    @Marine1 It's not contradiction, you just invented meaning that's not there. They totally don't say "come discuss question closure with me". That's just not there. – Félix Adriyel Gagnon-Grenier Jun 6 '18 at 14:16
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    I'm not sure what's offensive about being called a "random user". I am just a random user on Stack Overflow. User 215552 to be precise. I use my real name as my alias, but that's just my preference right now. I don't think it makes me any less "random" to the majority of other users on SO. – Heretic Monkey Jun 6 '18 at 14:25
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    Calling a single user out on Meta for a closure that you disagree with doesn't strike me as a productive way to solve things. There are ways to get questions reopened, and trickier cases (and by cases I mean actual content rather than users) can be brought here for a more accurate appreciation/scrutiny. Can we not make this a false argument towards SO being unwelcome? – E_net4 the flagger Jun 6 '18 at 14:30
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    So.... If someone is knowledgeable enough in a topic (gold tag badge-holder) but doesn't feel like discussing every single closure they do (and some of them do... A lot), we should make the site worse by revoking these privileges? I... Don't see it. What is insulting in what he said? He is a free user volunteering his time.... If he doesn't want to discuss, he doesn't have to. You can edit, send the question to the reopen queue. He doesn't have to be involved in the reopening. You think it would be ok for you to refuse him not wanting to discuss this further? Is that not rude? – Patrice Jun 6 '18 at 22:57
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    @Marine1 you have ways to get it reopened that don't involve talking to him. He is accountable to his actions, yes. If too much of his stuff gets reopened/flagged, something may come out of it. Does being accountable means he has the obligation to discuss in details EVERY moderation act he ever took? This is maybe where our opinions differ – Patrice Jun 6 '18 at 23:24
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    @Marine1 sorry... How is 'only those one may ask to discuss about' not everyone? Potentially, every single downvote, close vote,or whatnot is something a user somewhere could want to discuss... That is a slippery slope to 'every moderation act'. In my country, if someone shows up at my door to discuss a stop I didn't do with my car earlier that day, they will likely be turned around.... Does that make me rude? Maybe. I don't think so. If his buy in to reopen was necessary, I'd see it differently. It isn't needed, so I see no reason to oblige him to discuss. – Patrice Jun 6 '18 at 23:38
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    @Marine1 if the question is a dupe it SHOULD be closed as a dupe. There is no question about that. He isn't blocking others from answering. If he is right about the closure, he is simply making sure all answers are centralized. For the good of future visitors. – Patrice Jun 6 '18 at 23:39
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    @Marine1 this is no rules. Just common sense. I am happy to discuss in the appropriate time and place. Did you ping davidism on the question he closed? Leaving it to be his choice if he engages or not. Honestly having a blanket 'everyone should be willing to discuss everything with everyone else' is opened to so much abuse..... What of users who don't want to listen? Are we supposed to engage them ad vitam eternam? What if I discuss it with the OP. OP agreed with me but another user comes in and still wants to discuss? When do we stop this? – Patrice Jun 6 '18 at 23:47
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    Have you... Read the chat? The last comments in there are mine. There are questions in there. I don't know what more you expect from me.... 'questions in the chat' are in there. You're not answering..... This is getting sillier and sillier. As I said, nothing really productive will come out anyway. Especially not if you ignore the questions already in the chat and ask me for more... – Patrice Jun 8 '18 at 22:39
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You may have a slight misunderstanding of the purpose and spirit of Stack Overflow.

This is not a social forum. We're not exactly here to discuss everything forever. Experts users are given extended privilege, because they have proven, time and again, that they know their subjects.

That user closed a question, chances are extremely high that they are right.

You don't seem to have shown a desire to actually consider that maybe they were right, and it's not like they hurt you or something by kicking you out of the chat (which they also happen to be room owner of).

As far as public evidence is shown here, they were polite, and refused to get drawn in a conversation that had no tengent towards staying civil.

I support how they acted here.

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    They have no obligation to continue a conversation they do not want to partake into. You chased them to a chat room. Maybe you want to revisit your definitions of rudeness? – Félix Adriyel Gagnon-Grenier Jun 6 '18 at 14:17
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    @Marine I consider it rude when someone decides to pester me about something I don't want nor need to talk about, especially when there is a procedure for achieving the result they want to achieve employing community consensus. I consider it rude when people twist things to make other people sound bad and themselves sound good, especially when it is so plain to see when looking at the evidence that the case is reversed. That makes me feel like you think I'm stupid, which would be fairly rude. – user4639281 Jun 6 '18 at 14:21
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    You have a right to discuss his actions with them as much as they have a right to not discuss their actions with you. Fairness for you, but not for them right? @Marine1 – user4639281 Jun 6 '18 at 14:27
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    @Marine1 Do they not have the right to decline to speak with you? – Script47 Jun 6 '18 at 14:27
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    You can't possibly mean that forcing people to have a conversation, rejecting the obvious global consensus, and name calling everyone else rude, is a better mark of a community member? If you can't make it so that other human beings have a desire to speak with you, the onus is not on them to be forced to consider your speech. – Félix Adriyel Gagnon-Grenier Jun 6 '18 at 14:51
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    @Marine1 and if you force users to talk to each other, do you really have a community? The purpose of the community is to have choices, no? Surely if a discussion wasn't wanted then meta wouldn't exist. Yet, here you are being able to discuss the actions of an individual. The original premise of this question was based on the fact that you thought it was a moderator that closed your question, if it was, then sure you could ask why and you'd probably get an answer, but this is a regular user who has the choice to answer (not that a moderator doesn't have choice). – Script47 Jun 6 '18 at 14:51
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    @Marine1 Of course they are held accountable, how are they not? Their name is written all over, people have looked over this, and everyone has agreed that they acted correctly. How is that not accountable? Because you were proven wrong? There is a system in place to examine reopen requests, you tried to circumvent it, but that doesn't mean it does not exist. That the outcome is not the one you wish for doesn't make it wrong. – Félix Adriyel Gagnon-Grenier Jun 6 '18 at 14:56
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    Based on the statistics of this question (65 views, -15 votes), I think the community has decided that the individual that closed your question was in-fact, correct in their action. – Script47 Jun 6 '18 at 15:03
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    @Marine1 rather, when you edit a closed question, it pushes the question in to a queue which is then voted on impartially by different users. Isn't that be fairer and better? – Script47 Jun 6 '18 at 15:04
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    @Marine1 "can not appeal" What in heavens are you even talking about? You asked this question here, you talked about it in chat, roughly 70 people were implied in the process, and you say that you were not given your chance? Can you cite me any other online community where you would have had as much support? – Félix Adriyel Gagnon-Grenier Jun 6 '18 at 15:05
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    Lol, you cited Stack Overflow when I asked you of any other community than Stack Overflow with that level of support. I think I'm done here. – Félix Adriyel Gagnon-Grenier Jun 6 '18 at 15:09
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    @FélixGagnon-Grenier ES.stackoverflow.com – Revolucion for Monica Jun 6 '18 at 15:09
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    I can't see any problem, in principle, with a structured 'Appeals Procedure', as seemingly desired by some. A number of acknowledged gold-badge experts, three say, could consider the closure and issue a judgement. In practice, I can't see there being much demand. It would be very expensive indeed - the panel of experts would make their usual professional charges, and SO would want to cover their costs in adminstering it all. I mean, if @Marine1 wants to put $5000 up-front to ensure that the costs are covered, then I guess it could be done. – Martin James Jun 6 '18 at 16:01
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    @FélixGagnon-Grenier Unfortunately, our sister SO sites in foreign languages might not have similar quality standards. Can't speak for SO.es, but in SO.pt I have seen seemingly well received questions (by their upvotes), even answered by site moderators, which would have been closed here. – E_net4 the flagger Jun 6 '18 at 16:22
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    es.stackoverflow.com might be different because it is much smaller that Stack Overflow. Gold users might be contacted less often by users who want to discuss and might be more patient. – Modus Tollens Jun 6 '18 at 16:28

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