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The current tooltip text reads: "flag this post for serious problems or moderator attention"

I wasn't sure what the flag system was about so I read up to "flag this post for serious problems" and figured, oh, I shouldn't really be using the flag system. It is just for serious stuff.

Would more people use the feature if it read "flag this post for moderator attention or serious problems" to clarify that not every flag option is about a serious issue (duplicate posts, for example, need a moderator's attention but aren't a serious issue)? Do we want more people using it or is it worded that way to limit people's usage?

edit Regarding the closure as a duplicate of Add details about when to use custom flag. That question does not mention the text I was talking about or tooltips. This question does not mention custom flags. Rather, this question is about how hesitant users should be when using flags that match existing categories, particularly (and ironically) "Close as duplicate" since those requests are handled differently.

  • Are you talking about the tooltip (shown when you hover over ''flag")? I think that most people will just click it to see what it's for. – Laurel Jun 2 '18 at 3:46
  • @Laurel Yes, I edited the post to clarify that. I've encountered sites where just clicking "flag" is an action that can't be undone. Poor design on those sites but still, I always hesitate before reporting or flagging someone's post. But should I hesitate to mark duplicates if flagging them is considered helpful? – Zev Jun 2 '18 at 3:56
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This is a good question, though I'm not sure there is a way to actually improve on the status quo.

Would more people use the feature if it read "flag this post for moderator attention or serious problems" to clarify that not every flag option is about a serious issue (duplicate posts, for example, need a moderator's attention but aren't a serious issue)?

For our current purposes, we can group flags in three categories: close flags (including duplicate ones), the other standard flags, and custom flags ("in need of moderator intervention").

With the arguable exception of good duplicates, it seems fair to say that an issue that requires a question to be closed is a serious problem (a lesser problem might merit, for instance, just a corrective edit). As for the other other standard flags, they cover very serious problems (spam, rude/abusive content, and gibberish). Lastly, custom flags, which go straight to moderators, are meant to address exceptional situations that can't be dealt with through the usual community moderation tools -- and these situations are typically serious, and hairy problems.

(At this point, a clarification is perhaps in order. Duplicate flags are not handled by moderators. Like the other close flags, they send questions to the review queues, whose operators are regular users. Moderators -- sometimes referred to as diamond moderators for the sake of explicitness -- are a select group of users with additional powers required to handle exceptional situations.)

Do we want more people using it or is it worded that way to limit people's usage?

We don't want folks casting flags too casually. That is especially true for spam and rude/abusive (which can lead to heavy penalties even without moderator intervention), as well as custom flags (which always demand moderator time, a limited resource). Close flags are, from this point of view, lighter tools; however, their correct application tends be less straightforward than, say, spam flags, as proper closure decisions often require awareness of rather subtle aspects of the workings and customs of the site (that is why close flags are upgraded to close votes once an user reaches 3000 rep, which is a proxy for having a reasonable amount of experience with the site).

A separate issue with putting "moderator attention" before "serious problems" is that moderator intervention, as opposed to ordinary community moderation, should be thought of as a last resource, meant for exceptional situations. Putting "moderator attention" upfront might give the impression that escalating issues directly to moderators should be commonplace, or that all flags will end up being handled by moderators.

Lastly, it should be noted that it can be really difficult to make tooltips impeccably precise without making the UI too complicated or the text unwieldy. For a discussion involving similar difficulties in a different context, cf. Can we edit/remove the arrows' tooltips on Meta?

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