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I just encountered the second, more recent answer to this question in the Low Quality Posts review queue.

The answer is concise, and, despite a typo does give something that most would recognise an an "answer" - particularly demonstrated by the phrase "does exactly what you want". Another reviewer disagreed, however, and had already reviewed it as 'Not an answer'.

I initially wrote a comment in defence of the answer, quoting the documentation for the annotation he suggested, and up-voted. Then I re-read the documentation and realised that it didn't really cover the specific scenario defined in the question. So, I deleted my comment, removed my up-vote, and wrote a comment explaining why I no longer thought it was a good answer.

But then, I read the comments of the accepted answer. The answer says "it's impossible", but then 18 months later, someone has commented with the same solution that was proposed in the answer I'm looking at, and the OP has returned to thank him saying "This was exactly my requirement".

So - I'm not really sure what to do in the context of the review and/or how to improve the question and/or answer.

I think the review should be 'Looks OK', because it is an answer; arguably it's a wrong answer, but my understanding is that that's what the downvote button is for.

I'm also tempted to edit the answer (or encourage the OP to do so), to explain a little more context about why what he suggests is a solution. It's hard to make that a good answer though, with the way the question is worded, so then it would make sense to also edit the question. Editing the question would make the accepted answer (which is correct for the way the question is currently worded) incorrect.

My gut feeling is that it's a 4 year old question, and probably not worth spending lots of time on, but then I can also imagine it being a problem that others would be interested in, and currently you have to dig through the comments to find the answer that's (probably) what most people would be looking for!

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    write your own answer explaining what the issues are and what your solution is. – Robert Longson May 30 '18 at 7:09
  • Note that the comment saying "This was exactly my requirement" isn't actually from the OP. That makes things a little simpler. – duplode May 30 '18 at 8:21
  • @duplode - good spot, thank you, that does make it easier :) – DaveyDaveDave May 30 '18 at 9:04
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There are a few separate issues here, so let's go through them one at a time:

The answer is concise, and, despite a typo does give something that most would recognise an an "answer" - particularly demonstrated by the phrase "does exactly what you want". Another reviewer disagreed, however, and had already reviewed it as 'Not an answer'.

As you note, the review was mistaken: imprecision and laconicity issues aside, that post is clearly an answer as far as NAA goes, as a brief perusal of the "another castle" post should confirm.

I initially wrote a comment in defence of the answer, quoting the documentation for the annotation he suggested, and up-voted. Then I re-read the documentation and realised that it didn't really cover the specific scenario defined in the question. So, I deleted my comment, removed my up-vote, and wrote a comment explaining why I no longer thought it was a good answer.

If I'm grasping the issue correctly, there is a caveat which means the answer, while useful (likely even to the asker), does not exactly satisfy the requirements in the question. That being so, I suggest leaving a comment to the answer explicitly pointing out the issue to its author, aiming at getting it to be edited. That can lead to a smoother resolution than the alternatives you'd be otherwise compelled to resort to -- either making a unannounced, bold and transformative edit, or posting a competing answer.

I'm also tempted to edit the answer (or encourage the OP to do so), to explain a little more context about why what he suggests is a solution. It's hard to make that a good answer though, with the way the question is worded, so then it would make sense to also edit the question. Editing the question would make the accepted answer (which is correct for the way the question is currently worded) incorrect.

If the caveat that separates the answer from a full solution is sufficiently small, it can be reasonable to regard it as a satisfactory answer, as long as the caveat is explicitly acknowledged in the answer. If those conditions are met, editing the question should be unnecessary.

My gut feeling is that it's a 4 year old question, and probably not worth spending lots of time on, but then I can also imagine it being a problem that others would be interested in, and currently you have to dig through the comments to find the answer that's (probably) what most people would be looking for!

Questions here are meant to have long-term value, so "being a problem that others would be interested in" counts more than being "a 4 year old question". (in this kind of scenario, the main advantage of a post being recent is the increased likelihood of its author reacting to comments and helping to shape it up. That applies to the answer here.)

  • All great advice - thanks very much, I've done as you suggest :) – DaveyDaveDave May 30 '18 at 9:12

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