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I just came across a review in the "Suggested Edits" queue where a user just changed the phrase "At this point" to the word "Now", which obviously essentially doesn't change anything at all.

As the edit comment, the user entered "Fixed code" but the code in the question is completely unchanged.

Of course, it might just be an honest mistake. The user might have intended to actually fix some code, got distracted and then hit save accidentally or something like that. But the suggested edit was for a question that already has an accepted answer and it seems rather pointless to fix any code in that question.

So, to be honest, I tend to suspect the user to be speculating on superficial reviewers waving through the pseudo edit, which, as far as I can see, would amount to an attempt to deliberately game the system.

Should I call a moderators attention to the case or am I being overzealous and should just reject the edit (which I already did, of course) and forget about it?

Addition:

Maybe I should clarify why I'm asking this. Of course, I see pointless edit suggestions all the time. But so far, in all cases, it was easy to assume that the edit suggestion was made with good intentions and just failed to achieve a real improvement for one reason or another. This is just the first edit I came across that looks to me like it was made by someone who knows exactly what he/she is doing without any attempt to make a real contribution to the site.

But I'm happy to trust the self-protecting powers of SO against such behavior that are already in place. I was just unsure about what to do, so I sought some advice here. Thanks!

2nd Addition:

Actually, it was my mistake. Looking at it again I discovered that the user added a closing bracket, but the change was hidden because the code was too wide to fit in the displayed area of the code block.

Embarrassing! I should take a break...

  • "At this point" meant that last statement in the snippet produced an error, the np.load() call. "Now" is therefore not a correct interpretation, nor is a suspicion of gaming the system. A simple reject gets the job done. Or reject+edit to "This last statement". – Hans Passant May 26 '18 at 14:23
  • Are you worried about question authors bumping their posts to the front page out of impatience, or editors getting small amounts of rep for trivial edits? – halfer May 26 '18 at 15:51
  • @halfer About users making lots of pseudo edits that look legit if not examined carefully. I didn't know how good the system would prevent such a scheme. But in the end it turned out to be just a result of myself not considering the suggested edit carefully enough, as I describe in the 2nd addition to my question. – anothernode May 26 '18 at 16:07
  • Sure, but I was wondering what actual problem you believed you were seeing. There are certainly some problems with minor edits (rep collection, outright bad edits, trivial edits that hold up the review queue, etc). – halfer May 26 '18 at 19:01
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    @halfer I was thinking about the reputation aspect. – anothernode May 26 '18 at 19:07
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"Should I call a moderators attention"`

No, you simply decline the suggested edit. The moderators are busy enough to not have to be directed to such a trivial issue, one that we can easily handle ourselves. This is one reason that we have a suggested-edit queue, to off-load such tasks from the moderators.

And as mentioned by Patrice: "If enough of their suggested edits are rejected, they can get banned from edits anyway, so mods are truly superfluous there"

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    If enough of their suggested edits are rejected, they can get banned from edits anyway, so mods are truly superfluous there – Patrice May 26 '18 at 14:21
  • @Patrice: Yep, thanks. Hope you're OK w/ me adding that key information to the answer. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 26 '18 at 14:34
  • of course, go for it! – Patrice May 26 '18 at 16:15

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